Key:
CIS-Relevant Events


All forthcoming events

Mon 24 November 2014, 15:00

'Poland and Turkey: 600 Years of Diplomatic Relations'

Speaker: Marcin Zaborowski and Umut Korkut

Venue:Seminar Room, European Studies Centre 70 Woodstock

POMP Event

Conversation moderated by Maria Wilczek

Mon 24 November 2014, 17:00

‘Post-Soviet states and international norms: introducing the idea of internal conditionality’

Speaker: Rick Fawn (University of St Andrews)

Venue:Nissan Lecture Theatre, St. Antony's College

Convenors:  Roy Allison (St Antony’s, SIAS) & Neil MacFarlane (St Anne’s, DPIR)

All are welcome

THIS IS AN ADVANCED SEMINAR SERIES SUPPORTED BY THE DEPARTMENT OF POLITICS AND INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS, THE MANAGEMENT COMMITTEE OF RUSSIAN AND EAST EUROPEAN STUDIES, AND THE HARRY SHUKMAN SEMINAR FUND

(created in Harry’s memory by Fay and Geoffrey Elliott)

This event is part of the Russian and Eurasian Foreign Policies and Politics seminar series.

Mon 24 November 2014, 17:00

'What challenges do the spillovers from EU Banking Union pose for emerging economies in Europe?'

Speaker: Piroska Nagy (Director for Country Strategy and Policy, European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD))

Venue:Seminar Room, European Studies Centre 70 Woodstock

Chair: Adam Bennett (St Antony’s College, Oxford)

This event is part of the PEFM Seminar Series seminar series.

Tue 25 November 2014, 17:00

'Conceding to Thrive: Taiwan’s Path to Democracy and Lessons for China'

Speaker: Joseph Wong (University of Toronto)

Venue:Nissan Lecture Theatre, St. Antony's College

Taiwan Studies Programme, Asian Studies Centre

Abstract: Authoritarian ruling parties are expected to resist democratization, often times at all costs. And yet some of the strongest authoritarian parties in the world have not resisted democratization, but have instead embraced it. This is because their raison d’etre, we contend, is to continue ruling, though not necessarily to remain authoritarian. Put another way, democratization requires ruling parties hold free and fair elections, but not that they lose them. Authoritarian ruling parties can thus be incentivized to concede democratization from a position of exceptional strength. This alternative pathway to democracy is illustrated with the case of Taiwan, though set against a comparative-historical backdrop comprising other Asian cases where ruling parties democratized from positions of considerable strength, and not weakness. The conceding-to-thrive argument, we argue, has implications with respect to “candidate cases” in developmental Asia, where ruling parties have not yet conceded democratization despite being well-positioned to thrive were they to do so, such as the world’s most populous dictatorship, China.

About the speaker: Joseph Wong is the Ralph and Roz Halbert Professor of Innovation at the Munk School of Global Affairs, University of Toronto, and Professor of Political Science and Canada Research Chair in Democratization, Health and Development. Professor Wong was the Director of the Asian Institute at the Munk School from 2005 to 2014. In addition to academic articles and book chapters, Professor Wong has published four books: Healthy Democracies: Welfare Politics in Taiwan and South Korea (2004) and Betting on Biotech: Innovation and the Limits of Asia’s Developmental State (2011), both published by Cornell University Press, as well as Political Transitions in Dominant Party Systems: Learning to Lose, co-edited with Edward Friedman (Routledge, 2008), and Innovating for the Global South: Towards a New Innovation Agenda, co-edited with Dilip Soman and Janice Stein (University of Toronto Press, 2014). He is currently working on a book monograph with Dan Slater (University of Chicago) on Asia’s development and democracy, which is currently under contract with Princeton University Press. Wong has been a visiting scholar at Harvard, Oxford, Seoul National University, National University of Singapore and the Institute for National Policy Research in Taipei. He has advised the United Nations, World Bank, Economic Commission for Latin America and the World Health Organization, as well as for governments in Europe, Africa, Latin America, and Asia. In 2011 Wong was appointed Senior Fellow of the Asia-Pacific Foundation of Canada, and was honored in 2013 with the Faculty of Arts and Science Outstanding Teaching Award. Professor Wong earned his Hons. B.A from McGill University (1995) and Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin-Madison (2001). He is currently on sabbatical leave at Nuffield College, University of Oxford

Convenor: Feng-yi Chu (feng-yi.chu@sant.ox.ac.uk)

Tue 25 November 2014, 17:00

'Eurafrica: The Untold History of European Integration and Colonialism'

Speaker: Peo Hansen (Linköping University) and Stefan Jonsson (Linköping University)

Venue:Seminar Room, European Studies Centre 70 Woodstock

Discussants: Emily Jones (Global Economic Governance Programme, Blavatnik School of Government, Oxford), Paul Betts and William Beinart (St Antony’s College, Oxford)

Convenor: Kalypso Nicolaïdis (St Antony’s College, Oxford)

Co-sponsored by the African Studies Centre

This event is part of the ESC Core Seminar Series seminar series.

Tue 25 November 2014, 17:30

‘The Political Dimensions of Ebola’

Venue:MCR, Merton College

The Ebola epidemic in West Africa is an unprecedented public health crisis in the region. The crisis however also has important political dimensions at the global, regional and national level.  What does it tell us about the dynamics of the global public health industry? What role have national governments played in the response? What conclusions can we draw about citizens’ reactions to the crisis? 

Join Global Directions, Merton College’s International Relations research group for this panel discussion, where we will be addressing these questions in conversation with Andrew Keili of the Sierra Leone People’s Party. Mr. Keili has wide-ranging experience in both government and business in Sierra Leone, having worked in the mining industry and as an advisor to the President. He will discuss the current state of affairs in Sierra Leone and particularly the Ebola crisis about which he has written extensively. 

Mr. Keili will be joined by Julia Amos DPhil (Peter J Braam Junior Research Fellow in Global Wellbeing), Simukai Chigudu MD (DPhil Candidate in International Development), and Luisa Enria (DPhil Candidate in International Development).

About Global Directions

Global Directions (GD) is a research group based at Merton College. GD was founded in 2005 to serve as a cross-disciplinary forum for exploring pressing global issues and to foster a robust policy-relevant dialogue within the University and in conjunction with visiting experts and practitioners. Throughout the year we host a wide range of events, including lectures, film screenings, and lunchtime seminars on issues in international relations, global security, and development.  

Follow Global Directions on Facebook (facebook.com/GlobalDirections) to receive regular information on events and IR news. For more information about Global Directions please visit us at: www.merton.ox.ac.uk/research/global-directions

This event is part of the Global Directions Research Group, Merton College seminar series.

Tue 25 November 2014, 18:00

'Global political turmoil and the challenge to the West'

Speaker: Gideon Rachman (Chief Foreign Affairs Columnist for the Financial Times)

Venue:Dorfman centre, St Peters College

Gideon Rachman became chief foreign affairs columnist for the Financial Times in July 2006. He joined the FT after a 15-year career at The Economist, which included spells as a foreign correspondent in Brussels, Washington and Bangkok. He also edited The Economist’s business and Asia sections. His particular interests include American foreign policy, the European Union and globalization. His book Zero-Sum World was published in 2010 and predicted a rise in international political tensions, following the financial crisis of 2008.

The seating for this event is limited. Those wanting to attend must register with Linda Lee-Wright linda.lee-wright@spc.ox.ac.uk

Followed by a drinks reception 

Convenor: Ricardo Soares de Oliveira (DPIR)

Contact Linda Lee-Wright

Tue 25 November 2014, 20:30

'The Day After the Iran Nuclear Deadline'

Speaker: Mark Fitzpatrick (International Institute for Strategic Studies)

Venue:Old Library, All Souls College

£2 entry fee for nonmembers.

This event is part of the OUSSG Seminar Series seminar series.

Wed 26 November 2014, 14:00

'The Evolution of Sukuk in Malaysia: Imitation of the Conventional Capital Market or Innovation of Islamic Financial Practices?'

Speaker: Lena Rethel (Associate Professor, University of Warwick) and Kerstin Steiner (Senior Lecturer, Monash University)

Venue:The Deakin Room, Founder’s Building, St Antony’s College

Convenor & Chair: Dr Matthew J Walton

This event is part of the Southeast Asia Seminar Series seminar series.

Wed 26 November 2014, 17:00

'Greece in the Euro: Economic delinquency or system failure?'

Speaker: Eleni Panagiotarea (Advisor for the Ministries of Foreign Affairs and Finance; Hellenic Foundation for European & Foreign Policy (ELIAMEP))

Venue:Seminar Room, European Studies Centre 70 Woodstock

Discussant: Jonathan Scheele (St Antony’s College, Oxford)

Chair: Adam Bennett (St Antony’s College, Oxford)

This event is part of the SEESOX Seminar Series seminar series.

Thu 27 November 2014, 12:30

IR Research Colloquium: 'UN Peacekeeping Mission Diversity, Whistle-Blowing and Reporting Abuses'

Speaker: Vincenzo Bove (Warwick) & Andrea Ruggeri (Brasenose)

Venue:Manor Road Building, Seminar Room G

Discussant: Yuna Han (Lady Margaret Hall)

Pre-registration required. To register and receive the colloquium paper please email andrew.melling@politics.ox.ac.uk no later than noon on Wednesday 26 November.

This event is part of the IR Research Colloquium seminar series.

Thu 27 November 2014, 17:00

POMP World War I Film Series 6: “Gallipoli”

Venue:Seminar Room, European Studies Centre 70 Woodstock

“Gallipoli” by Peter Weir (1981)

Discussant: TBC

Convenor: Mikolaj Kunicki (St Antony’s College, Oxford)

Fri 28 November 2014, 12:30

'Feminism and Cultural Pluralism'

Speaker: Elizabeth Frazer (DPIR), Patricia Daley (School of Geography and the Environment) and Henrike Donner (Department of Social Sciences, Oxford Brookes)

Venue:Manor Road Building, Seminar Room G

This seminar seeks to explore the relationship between the ideals of (western) feminism and of cultural pluralism, looking to examples of how tensions between the two discourses have manifested within international politics. Multi-national and non-governmental campaigns against violence proclaim ‘women’s rights are human rights’, yet the discourse of human rights is rejected within many societies as a Western imposition that is at best insensitive to, and at worst wholly incompatible with, indigenous cultural norms. Critical and post-structural theoretical approaches provide intellectual frameworks that help us to make sense of and attempt to work through these dilemmas.

This seminar aims to explore and extend these debates. To what extent have western conceptions of feminism ‘travelled’ and thereby strengthened the power asymmetries between ‘the West’ and ‘Others’? Should ’feminism’ and ‘gender equality’ be considered inherently Western phenomena that risk essentialising women? Can we reconcile tensions between different concepts of gender equality and the rights of individuals? Should we? What does all of this mean for international initiatives to end various forms of violence against women and girls, which implicitly rely on the rhetoric of universal human rights? What role should these concepts play in culturally plural international and domestic societies?

Organisers: Fay Clarke and Leandra Bias, Oxford University

 

Critical theories and world politics seminar series

This is a new student-led roundtable series at Oxford University for interdisciplinary discussion of world politics. Supported the Centre for International Studies (CIS), these seminars draw on approaches from the humanities and the social sciences, explicitly seeking to bring different disciplines to bear on each other and on common areas of intellectual inquiry.

The series seeks to consider questions about world politics using methodological approaches informed by critical theories. We are particularly interested in issues of representation, language and ideology, gender, race, class, memory, space/place, political ecologies, anti-colonial politics, resistance and in thinking beyond and around borders. We hope that the series will provide a forum for ‘research training’ in these areas for interested students.

Each session is organised by different students, from a range of disciplinary backgrounds, who put forward a theme or topic they would like to see discussed. The format may vary from session to session, but the baseline structure will be a roundtable discussion led by 2-3 speakers and followed by an informal discussion.

 

Fri 28 November 2014, 17:00

SEESOX Film Screening: “My Child”

Venue:Seminar Room, European Studies Centre 70 Woodstock

SEESOX Film Screening

“My Child” A Turkish Feature Documentary

Panellists: Can Candan (Director), Metehan Ozkan (Co-producer/Advisor)

Chair: Elisabeth Kendall (Pembroke College, Oxford)

Mon 01 December 2014, 12:30

‘R2P’s Unfinished Journey: the Lingering Promise of Prevention’

Speaker: Monica Serrano (Professor of International Relations, El Colegio de México)

Venue:Seminar Room, European Studies Centre 70 Woodstock

Centre for International Studies (CIS) event, co-sponsored by Ethics Law and Armed Conflict (ELAC)

Mon 01 December 2014, 17:00

‘Lessons of the Ukraine crisis’

Speaker: Andrew Wilson (University College London)

Venue:Nissan Lecture Theatre, St. Antony's College

Convenors:  Roy Allison (St Antony’s, SIAS) & Neil MacFarlane (St Anne’s, DPIR)

All are welcome

THIS IS AN ADVANCED SEMINAR SERIES SUPPORTED BY THE DEPARTMENT OF POLITICS AND INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS, THE MANAGEMENT COMMITTEE OF RUSSIAN AND EAST EUROPEAN STUDIES, AND THE HARRY SHUKMAN SEMINAR FUND

(created in Harry’s memory by Fay and Geoffrey Elliott)

This event is part of the Russian and Eurasian Foreign Policies and Politics seminar series.

Tue 02 December 2014, 14:00

‘Pakistan’s Metamorphosis to Modernity’

Speaker: Ayesha Siddiqa (Charles Wallace Trust Fellow)

Venue:Fellow’s Dining Room, Hilda Besse Building, St Antony’s College

Convenor & Chair: Dr Faisal Devji

This event is part of the South Asia Seminar Series seminar series.

Tue 02 December 2014, 20:30

'Russian "Deniable Involvement" in Ukraine'

Speaker: Roy Allison (Oxford)

Venue:Old Library, All Souls College

£2 entry fee for nonmembers.

This event is part of the OUSSG Seminar Series seminar series.

Thu 04 December 2014, 12:30

IR Research Colloquium: 'Islamists and Nationalists: Rebel Motivation and Counterinsurgency in Russia’s North Caucasus'

Speaker: Monica Duffy Toft (Blavatnik School of Government)

Venue:Manor Road Building, Seminar Room G

Discussant: Hanna Notte (St Antony’s)

Pre-registration required. To register and receive the colloquium paper please email andrew.melling@politics.ox.ac.uk no later than noon on Wednesday 3 December.

This event is part of the IR Research Colloquium seminar series.

Fri 05 December 2014, 17:00

'Chinese Reform in Light of James Meade’s Liberal Socialism'

Speaker: Zhiyuan Cui (School of Public Policy and Management, Tsinghua University)

Venue:Pavilion Room, Gateway Building, St. Antony's College

Huang Hsing Foundation – The Dr Chun-tu Hsueh Annual Lecture

China’s economic and political reform since 1978 has been a major event in recent world history. The lecture asks whether these on-going reforms can be interpreted, at least to some extent, by reference to James Meade’s “Liberal Socialism”. James Meade was educated in “Philosophy, Politics and Economics” at Oxford from 1926 to 1930 and was awarded the Nobel Prize in Economics in 1977. He describes himself as “an inveterate explorer of improvements in economic arrangements”. It will argued that Meade’s ideas can shed light on some major moves in the Chinese reform of the state owned enterprises’ sector and the rural cooperative sector. The next challenge in China is to combine “liberalism” and “socialism” in the political sphere as well.

Professor Zhiyuan Cui is a teacher in Comparative Public Policy and Governance and Development at Tsinghua University. As a graduate of China's National University of Defense Technology, Cui went on to obtain both an MA and a Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of Chicago. He has been awarded visiting fellowships and instructor positions at various world-renowned institutions including MIT, the National University of Singapore, Harvard University Law School, the Institute for Advanced Study in Berlin, and Cornell University. Dr. Cui has also served as a member of the editorial boards for various journals and publications.

Chair: Professor Rosemary Foot