Thu 13 March 2014, 17:00

'Poland, Ukraine, and the Politics of History'

Speaker: Timothy Snyder (Yale University)

Venue:Nissan Lecture Theatre, St. Antony's College

Convenor: Dr Mikolaj Kunicki (St Antony's College, Oxford)

Thu 13 March 2014, 17:00

'The State, Mobilization and Repression: Evidence from post-Coup Egypt'

Speaker: Neil Ketchley (PhD Candidate in the Department of Government, LSE)

Venue:Butler Room, Nuffield College

Discussant: Dr Lucie Ryzova from Faculty of History, Oxford University

This event is part of the Oxford Social Mobilisation Seminar seminar series.

Contact Juta Kawalerowicz

Wed 12 March 2014, 17:00

'Lenses of History: Projections of Communism in Polish Contemporary Cinema'

Speaker: Mikolaj Kunicki (St Antony’s College, Oxford)

Venue:Seminar Room, European Studies Centre 70 Woodstock

Discussant: Marsha Siefert (Central European University, Budapest)

Chair: Nicolette Makovicky (School of Interdisciplinary Area Studies, Oxford)

This event is part of the Programme on Modern Poland (POMP) Seminar Series seminar series.

Tue 11 March 2014, 13:00

'The Politics of Foreign Policy After 9/11’

Speaker: James Rubin (Visiting Scholar at the Rothermere American Institute, Oxford)

Venue:Manor Road Building, Seminar Room A

Centre for International Studies (CIS) and Rothermere American Institute (RAI) Co-sponsored Event

Chair: Kalypso Nicolaïdis (St Antony’s College, Oxford)

James Rubin is a Visiting Scholar at the Rothermere American Institute, Oxford. He served under President Clinton as Assistant Secretary of State for Public Affairs and Chief Spokesman for the State Department from 1997 to May 2000. He was also a top policy adviser to Secretary of State Madeleine K. Albright and acted as a special negotiator during the Kosovo war to secure the demobilization of the Kosovo Liberation Army.

Lunch will be provided.

Tue 11 March 2014, 17:00

'The Making of a Continental Financial System: Lessons from Early American History'

Speaker: Vitor Gaspar (Bank of Portugal)

Venue:Seminar Room, European Studies Centre 70 Woodstock

PEFM Seminar

Convenors: Francisco Torres (St Antony’s College, Oxford) and Max Watson (St Antony’s College, Oxford)

Tue 11 March 2014, 17:00

Challenging Technologies in the Information Age: 'Balkanisation of the Internet'

Speaker: Jon Sullivan, University of Nottingham and Editor of the China Policy Institute blog

Venue:Nissan Lecture Theatre, St. Antony's College

CHALLENGING TECHNOLOGIES IN THE INFORMATION AGE: Challenges and Opportunities for the Individual and Nations around the World

Convenors: Lord Desmond Browne, Baroness Jane Bonham-Carter, Dr Phyllis Starkey and Professor Robert Service

Balkanisation of the Internet - what are the prospects for countries where the Internet is heavily censored or threatened?   Are there more dangers than opportunities?   And does the Arab Spring show that the positive opportunities may be only fleeting?

Chair:  Robert Service

ALL ARE MOST WELCOME TO ATTEND

This event is part of the Visiting parliamentary fellowship seminar series seminar series.

Contact Adele Biagi

Mon 10 March 2014, 17:00

Documentary Film and Discussion: 'Majority starts here – a film on youth and legacy of conflicts in the Balkans'

Speaker: Gordana Igric (Balkan Insights, Serbia); Ana Petruseva (Balkan Insights, Macedonia); Jeta Xharra (Balkan Insights, Kosovo)

Venue:Pavilion Room, Gateway Building, St. Antony's College

SEESOX Seminar

Chair: Kalypso Nicolaïdis (St Antony’s College, Oxford)

Fri 07 March 2014, 12:30

'EU Bailout Conditionality as a De Facto Mode of Government: A Neo-Liberal Black Hole for the Greek Collective Labour Law System?'

Speaker: Ioannis Katsaroumpas (Law)

Venue:Seminar Room, European Studies Centre 70 Woodstock

Chair: Othon Anastasakis (St Antony's)

Lunch provided

This event is part of the ESC DPhil Lunchtime Seminar Series seminar series.

Fri 07 March 2014, 17:00

'Twenty Years after Genocide: Memories, Reflections, and Ways Forward'

Speaker: H.E. Johan Swinnen (Belgian Ambassador to Rwanda, 1990–94)

Venue:Talbot Hall, Lady Margaret Hall

The Oxford Central Africa Forum (OCAF), the Centre for International Studies (CIS), and Lady Margaret Hall present:

Lecture to Commemorate the 20th Anniversary of the Rwandan Genocide

H.E. Johan Swinnen became Belgium’s Ambassador to Rwanda in 1990, the year in which the Rwandan civil war started, and remained in this position until the end of the first week of the genocide in April 1994. His other ambassadorial posts were in the Netherlands (1997–2002), the Democratic Republic of Congo (2004–08), and Spain (2009–11). He also served as Spokesman and Head of the Press Office of Foreign Affairs (1988–90), and as Head of the Diplomatic Office of the Prime Minister (1994–97). Presently retired, H.E. Swinnen is chairman of the Commissions of the Belgian Interministerial Conference for External Policies, chairman of the Brussels-based VIRA (International Relations Association), and a member of the Academic Senate of the KU Leuven (Louvain). He is currently writing a book about his mission in Rwanda.

Followed by a drinks reception in the Old Library at 6:30pm.

Contact Henning Tamm

Thu 06 March 2014, 12:30

'Inside Greek terrorism'

Speaker: George Kassimeris (University of Wolverhampton)

Venue:Seminar Room, European Studies Centre 70 Woodstock

SEESOX Seminar

Discussant: David Madden (St Antony’s College, Oxford)

Chair: Tryfon Bampilis (St Antony’s College, Oxford)

Lunch Provided

Thu 06 March 2014, 14:00

'WTO and the Political Economy of Reform in Vietnam'

Speaker: Tu-Anh Vu-Thanh (Oxford-Princeton Global Leaders Fellow, University of Oxford; Director of Research, Fulbright Economics Teaching Program)

Venue:Dahrendorf Room, Founder’s Building at St Antony’s

All are welcome

Convenor & Chair: Dr Matthew J Walton

This event is part of the Southeast Asia Seminar Series seminar series.

Wed 05 March 2014, 12:30

'The role of the state in the Innovation Triangle: regulatory, business, and innovation law and policy'

Speaker: Peteris Zilgalvis (St Antony’s College, Oxford)

Venue:Seminar Room, European Studies Centre 70 Woodstock

Chair: Max Watson (St Antony’s College, Oxford)

Lunch Provided

This event is part of the ESC Visiting Fellows Lunch-time Seminars seminar series.

Wed 05 March 2014, 17:00

'From Kochanowski to Huelle and Beyond: Translating Polish Literature Before and After 1989'

Speaker: Antonia Lloyds-Jones, Ursual Phillips, George Gomori

Venue:Seminar Room, European Studies Centre 70 Woodstock

Chair: Jan Fellerer (Wolfson College, Oxford)

This event is part of the Programme on Modern Poland (POMP) Seminar Series seminar series.

Tue 04 March 2014, 17:00

Challenging Technologies in the Information Age: 'Health'

Speaker: Mark Caulfield (QMW), Jane Kaye (Director of the Centre for Law, Health and Emerging Technologies), Sundeep Dhillon (St Edmund Hall, UCL Lecturer on Space Medicine and Extreme Environment Physiology)

Venue:Nissan Lecture Theatre, St. Antony's College

CHALLENGING TECHNOLOGIES IN THE INFORMATION AGE: Challenges and Opportunities for the Individual and Nations around the World

Convenors: Lord Desmond Browne, Baroness Jane Bonham-Carter, Dr Phyllis Starkey and Professor Robert Service

Health – who should have access to your genome?  Implications for health, employment and insurance?

Chair:  Phyllis Starkey

ALL ARE MOST WELCOME TO ATTEND

This event is part of the Visiting parliamentary fellowship seminar series seminar series.

Contact Adele Biagi

Tue 04 March 2014, 17:00

'Europe, Russia and the Contested Neighbourhood'

Speaker: Neil MacFarlane (St Anne’s College, Oxford), Roy Allison (St Antony’s College, Oxford) and Kalypso Nicolaïdis (St Antony’s College, Oxford)

Venue:Seminar Room, European Studies Centre 70 Woodstock

Georgian, Ukrainian, and Armenian Societies Seminar

In association with the European Studies Centre

Mon 03 March 2014, 17:00

'Ethno-nationalist conflict in post-communist states: Varieties of governance in Bulgaria, Macadonia and Kosovo'

Speaker: Maria Koinova (University of Warwick)

Venue:Seminar Room, European Studies Centre 70 Woodstock

Discussant: Cvete Koneska (St Antony’s College, Oxford)

Chair: Richard Caplan ( Linacre College, Oxford)

This event is part of the SEESOX Seminar Series seminar series.

Fri 28 February 2014, 12:30

'British Policy and the Tudeh Party of Iran, 1941-1953'

Speaker: Rowena Abdul Razak (Oriental Studies)

Venue:Seminar Room, European Studies Centre 70 Woodstock

Chair: Cathryn Costello (St Antony's)

Lunch provided

This event is part of the ESC DPhil Lunchtime Seminar Series seminar series.

Fri 28 February 2014, 14:00

Special Lecture: 'The Future of Aid: International Development in hard times: Reflecting on the major multilateral replenishments of 2013'

Speaker: Richard Manning (Vice Chair of the Global Fund Replenishment and Coordinator of the Replenishment of the AfDB’s soft fund. Former chair of the OECD’s Development Assistance Committee, 2003-08)

Venue:Lecture Theatre, Blavatnik School of Government, 10 Merton Street, Oxford, OX1 4JJ

In the wake of economic recessions in many OECD countries, many donors are now cutting aid budgets. How will this affect donor contributions to the multilateral development system? In late 2013, three of the most significant multilateral funds will have completed three-year replenishments – IDA (the principal source of World Bank funding for low income countries), the African Development Fund (the soft-loan arm of the African Development Bank) and the Global Fund for AIDS, TB and Malaria. This replenishment round is a key ‘checkpoint’ for assessing the state of the multilateral system. Under budget constraints, will traditional donors continue to support multilateral development financing? Will new and emerging donors be able and willing to fill the gap left by traditional donors cutting back?  Does multilateral aid as we have known it have a future, as the world addresses the post-2015 challenges?

In this special lecture, one of the world’s leading experts on aid financing will reflect on the future of aid, and how to finance international development in hard economic times.

Thu 27 February 2014, 17:00

‘Winning friends abroad: can Britain’s cultural power maintain its influence in the modern world?’

Speaker: Sir Martin Davidson KCMG, CEO of the British Council

Venue:Manor Road Building, Seminar Room G

CIS EVENT

Sir Martin Davidson KCMG, CEO of the British Council, examines the UK’s soft power capacity: its ability to make its national presence felt through its powers of cultural attraction rather than its economic muscle and military might. In a rapidly changing international environment, achieving its foreign policy goals will require all of the UK’s creativity, wit and innovation. Does the UK have what it takes?

Martin Davidson took up the role as Chief Executive at the British Council in April 2007. Prior to the British Council he worked for the Hong Kong Government as an Administrative Officer.  He joined the British Council as Assistant Representative in Beijing in 1984.  Martin was responsible for opening the South China office in Guangzhou in 1989 and returned to Beijing in 1995 as Director China. He speaks both Cantonese and Mandarin. He has also held various posts in the British Council’s London HQ with responsibilities covering South East Europe, the Middle East, East Asia and the Americas.

He is International trustee for Leonard Cheshire Disability, a Governor of Goodenough College and Board Member of the Great Britain China Council. Martin was awarded a KCMG in 2014 for his services to British cultural, scientific and educational interests worldwide.

Contact Matthew Kennedy

Wed 26 February 2014, 12:30

'“We often forget that foreign families are normal”: French social housing and (post)colonial migration (c.1950-1975)'

Speaker: Ed Naylor (St Antony’s College, Oxford)

Venue:Seminar Room, European Studies Centre 70 Woodstock

Lunch Provided

This event is part of the ESC Visiting Fellows Lunch-time Seminars seminar series.

Wed 26 February 2014, 17:00

'Vectors of Looking: Reflections on the Luftwaffe's aerial survey of Warsaw, 1944'

Speaker: Ella Chmielewska (Edinburgh College of Art, University of Edinburgh)

Venue:Seminar Room, European Studies Centre 70 Woodstock

Discussant: John Beck (Department of English, Linguistics and Cultural Studies, University of Westminster)

Convenor: Mikolaj Kunicki (St Antony’s College, Oxford)

OPEN TO PUBLIC

This event is part of the Programme on Modern Poland (POMP) Seminar Series seminar series.

Tue 25 February 2014, 12:30

'The consequences of Brexit for both Britain and the EU'

Speaker: Hugo Dixon (Reuters)

Venue:Seminar Room, European Studies Centre 70 Woodstock

ESC Seminar

Chair: Othon Anastasakis (St Antony’s College, Oxford)

Lunch Provided

Tue 25 February 2014, 17:00

Challenging Technologies in the Information Age: 'Cyber Warfare'

Speaker: Lord John Reid (former Defence Secretary and Home Secretary), Prof. Paul Cornish (University of Exeter, Professor of Strategic Studies and Senior Associate Fellow at RUSI)

Venue:Nissan Lecture Theatre, St. Antony's College

CHALLENGING TECHNOLOGIES IN THE INFORMATION AGE: Challenges and Opportunities for the Individual and Nations around the World

Convenors: Lord Desmond Browne, Baroness Jane Bonham-Carter, Dr Phyllis Starkey and Professor Robert Service

Cyber Warfare – offence and defence, non-state actors; does it operate within or outside international law? How desirable are drones?

Chair:  Des Browne

ALL ARE MOST WELCOME TO ATTEND

This event is part of the Visiting parliamentary fellowship seminar series seminar series.

Contact Adele Biagi

Mon 24 February 2014, 17:00

CANCELLED EVENT: 'Contested truth and elusive reconciliation: Narrating the Yugoslav wars through truth commission initiatives'

Speaker: Jasna Dragovic-Soso (Goldsmiths, University of London)

Venue:Seminar Room, European Studies Centre 70 Woodstock

This event has been cancelled.

This event is part of the SEESOX Seminar Series seminar series.

Mon 24 February 2014, 17:00

SEESOX Annual Lecture: 'Reinventing politics in the Balkans: From the local to the regional and European'

Speaker: Edi Rama (Prime Minister of Albania)

Venue:Nissan Lecture Theatre, St. Antony's College

Chair: Othon Anastasakis (St Antony’s College, Oxford)

To register for the event please contact: julie.adams@sant.ox.ac.uk

 

Fri 21 February 2014 to Sat 22 February 2014, 16:30

'Poland’s Peaceful Revolution: 25 Years After the Polish Roundtable Talks'

Venue:Nissan Lecture Theatre, St. Antony's College

Open to Public but places are limited. To register your attendance please contact kaja.wawrzak@sant.ox.ac.uk

Conference Programme

21st February (Friday)

4:30 – 5:00 Registration

5:00 – 5:10 Opening Remarks: Othon Anastasakis (St Antony’s College, Oxford)

5:10 – 5:15 Footage of the Roundtable Talks

5:15 – 7:00 Panel: Keynote Speaker: Aleksander Smolar (Stefan Batory Foundation) Timothy Garton Ash (St Antony’s College, Oxford) Dariusz Stola (Institute of Political Studies, Polish Academy of Sciences)

22nd February (Saturday)

8:30 – 9:00 Registration

9:00 – 10:45 Session I: Dissidents. The legacy of Jacek Kuron. David Ost (Hobart and William Smith Colleges) Anna Bikont (Gazeta Wyborcza)

10:45 – 11:00 Coffee break

11:00 – 12:45 Session II: Non-Polish cases of peaceful negotiations between authoritarian regimes and democratic forces. South Africa: Colin Bundy (Honorary Fellow Green Templeton College, Oxford) Hungary: Andreas Mink (Central European University, Open Society Archive) Spain: Charles Powell (Elcano Royal Institute)

 

Contact Kaja Wawrzak

Wed 19 February 2014, 12:30

'Political EMU: EU and Domestic Constraints'

Speaker: Francisco Torres (St Antony's College, Oxford) and Kalypso Nicolaïdis (St Antony’s College, Oxford)

Venue:Seminar Room, European Studies Centre 70 Woodstock

Lunch Provided

This event is part of the ESC Visiting Fellows Lunch-time Seminars seminar series.

Wed 19 February 2014, 17:00

'Poles and Germans into Silesians: Serial Nationalizations in Late 20th Century Poland'

Speaker: Jim Bjork (Department of History, King’s College, London)

Venue:Seminar Room, European Studies Centre 70 Woodstock

Discussant: Hugo Service (Department of History, Oxford)

Chair: Paul Betts (St Antony’s College, Oxford)

This event is part of the Programme on Modern Poland (POMP) Seminar Series seminar series.

Tue 18 February 2014, 17:00

Challenging Technologies in the Information Age: 'Commerce and Marketing'

Speaker: Baroness Lucy Neville-Rolfe (Former Executive Director of Tesco), Sam Jeffers (Leader of the London agency team of Blue State Digital), Peter Fitzgerald (Vertical Sales Director for Google UK & Ire)

Venue:Nissan Lecture Theatre, St. Antony's College

CHALLENGING TECHNOLOGIES IN THE INFORMATION AGE: Challenges and Opportunities for the Individual and Nations around the World

Convenors: Lord Desmond Browne, Baroness Jane Bonham-Carter, Dr Phyllis Starkey and Professor Robert Service

Commerce and Marketing – why do we trust Tesco or Google with our data but not governments?

Chair:  Jane Bonham Carter

ALL ARE MOST WELCOME TO ATTEND

This event is part of the Visiting parliamentary fellowship seminar series seminar series.

Contact Adele Biagi

Mon 17 February 2014, 17:00

'Greece: Taking stock - economic and financial changes since the onset of the global and euro area crises'

Speaker: Eleni Dendrinou-Louri (Bank of Greece, Athens)

Venue:Seminar Room, European Studies Centre 70 Woodstock

In association with PEFM

Discussant: Francisco Torres (St Antony’s College, Oxford)

Chair: Max Watson (St Antony's College, Oxford)

This event is part of the SEESOX Seminar Series seminar series.

Sat 15 February 2014, 09:00

'Geographies of Neoliberalism and Resistance After the Crisis: The State, Violence, and Labour'

Venue:Halford Mackinder Lecture Theatre, School of Geogr

CIS co-sponsored event

For details on this conference please visit: http://geographiesofresistance.wordpress.com/

To register for this conference either visit the conference website or email Adam Elliott-Cooper at adam.elliott-cooper@jesus.ox.ac.uk 

 

Fri 14 February 2014, 12:30

'Raising European Citizens? European Identity of Children with Binational Intra-European Parents'

Speaker: Judith Rohde-Liebenau (Sociology)

Venue:Seminar Room, European Studies Centre 70 Woodstock

Chair: Kalypso Nicolaidis (St Antony's)

Lunch provided

This event is part of the ESC DPhil Lunchtime Seminar Series seminar series.

Wed 12 February 2014, 12:30

'Security and Energy in the Eastern Mediterranean'

Speaker: Androulla Kaminara (St Antony’s College, Oxford)

Venue:Seminar Room, European Studies Centre 70 Woodstock

Discussant: Gareth Winrow (Independent Analyst)

Chair: Avi Shlaim (St Antony’s College, Oxford)

Lunch Provided

This event is part of the ESC Visiting Fellows Lunch-time Seminars seminar series.

Wed 12 February 2014, 17:00

'Ironic Tropes and the Poetics of Self: Trickster Tales from Highland Poland'

Speaker: Nicolette Makovicky (School of Interdisciplinary Area Studies, Oxford)

Venue:Seminar Room, European Studies Centre 70 Woodstock

Discussant: Uilleam Blacker (Russian and East European Studies, Oxford)

Chair: Tryfon Bampilis (St Antony's College, Oxford) 

This event is part of the Programme on Modern Poland (POMP) Seminar Series seminar series.

Tue 11 February 2014, 12:30

'How much future for the EU might be found in the history of the Council of Europe?'

Speaker: Andreas Gross (Swiss MP and Head of Socialist Group, Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe)

Venue:Seminar Room, European Studies Centre 70 Woodstock

ESC Seminar

Chair: Kalypso Nicolaïdis (St Antony’s College, Oxford)

Tue 11 February 2014, 17:00

'Is the EU Doomed?'

Venue:Seminar Room, European Studies Centre 70 Woodstock

Book Discussion

Panellists: Jan Zielonka, Author (St Antony’s College, Oxford), Andreas Gross (Swiss MP and Head of Socialist Group, Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe), Edward Lucas (The Economist), Kalypso Nicolaïdis (St Antony’s College, Oxford)

Convenor: Othon Anastasakis (St Antony’s College, Oxford)

Tue 11 February 2014, 17:00

Challenging Technologies in the Information Age: 'Social Inclusion'

Speaker: Prof. Wendy Hall (Professor of Computer Science at the University of Southampton), Emma Soames (Editor-at-large, Saga Magazine), Laura Bates (Founder of the Everyday Sexism Project)

Venue:Nissan Lecture Theatre, St. Antony's College

CHALLENGING TECHNOLOGIES IN THE INFORMATION AGE: Challenges and Opportunities for the Individual and Nations around the World

Convenors: Lord Desmond Browne, Baroness Jane Bonham-Carter, Dr Phyllis Starkey and Professor Robert Service

Social Inclusion – do new technologies reduce inequality or increase access? 

Chair:  Jane Bonham Carter

ALL ARE MOST WELCOME TO ATTEND

This event is part of the Visiting parliamentary fellowship seminar series seminar series.

Contact Adele Biagi

Mon 10 February 2014, 17:00

'The Sandžak: A History'

Speaker: Kenneth Morrison (De Montfort University, Leicester) and Elizabeth Roberts (Trinity College, Oxford)

Venue:Seminar Room, European Studies Centre 70 Woodstock

Book Launch

Chair: David  Madden (St Antony’s College, Oxford)

Fri 07 February 2014, 12:30

'British, French and American Attitudes and Policies Towards the Rebirth of Poland, 1914-1921'

Speaker: Denis Clark (History)

Venue:Seminar Room, European Studies Centre 70 Woodstock

Chair: Mikolaj Kunicki (St Antony's)

Lunch provided

This event is part of the ESC DPhil Lunchtime Seminar Series seminar series.

Fri 07 February 2014, 17:00

'Enlightenment and revolution: The making of Modern Greece'

Speaker: Paschalis M. Kitromilides (University of Athens)

Venue:Seminar Room, European Studies Centre 70 Woodstock

Book Launch and Panel Discussion

Paschalis M. Kitromilides, Author (University of Athens)

Panellists: Joanna Innes (Somerville College, Oxford ), Peter Mackridge (St Cross College, Oxford), John Robertson (University of Cambridge)

Chair: Renée Hirschon (St Peter’s College, Oxford)

Wed 05 February 2014, 12:30

'The EU’s external energy policy towards gas suppliers in the neighbourhood. The cases of Azerbaijan and Algeria'

Speaker: Bernd Weber (Department of Politics and International Relations, Oxford)

Venue:Seminar Room, European Studies Centre 70 Woodstock

Chair: Androulla Kaminara (St Antony’s College, Oxford)

Lunch Provided

This event is part of the ESC Visiting Fellows Lunch-time Seminars seminar series.

Wed 05 February 2014, 17:00

'Between Secrecy and Exposure: The Politics of Accounting for the C.I.A. Prison in Poland'

Speaker: Dr Karolina Follis (Department of Politics, Philosophy and Religion, Lancaster University)

Venue:Seminar Room, European Studies Centre 70 Woodstock

Discussant: Dr Christopher Moran (Department of Politics and International Studies, University of Warwick)

Chair: Dr Othon Anastasakis (St Antony’s College, Oxford)

The Seminar is open to public. Tea and coffee will be served before the Seminar.

For our updated events please visit: http://www.sant.ox.ac.uk/pomp/current_and_past_activities.html

This event is part of the Programme on Modern Poland (POMP) Seminar Series seminar series.

Tue 04 February 2014, 17:00

Challenging Technologies in the Information Age: 'Political change around the world'

Speaker: Lindsey Hilsum (Channel 4 International Editor), Sam Barrett (UK Media Director of online pressure group AVAAZ), Turi Munthe (CEO of the multi-award winning citizen newswire Demotix)

Venue:Nissan Lecture Theatre, St. Antony's College

CHALLENGING TECHNOLOGIES IN THE INFORMATION AGE: Challenges and Opportunities for the Individual and Nations around the World

Convenors: Lord Desmond Browne, Baroness Jane Bonham-Carter, Dr Phyllis Starkey and Professor Robert Service

'Political change around the world – do the new technologies allow people to seize the agenda from the elites?'

Chair:  Robert Service

Lindsey Hilsum, Channel 4 International Editor

Sam Barrett, UK Media Director of online pressure group AVAAZ

Turi Munthe, CEO of the multi-award winning citizen newswire Demotix

ALL ARE MOST WELCOME TO ATTEND

This event is part of the Visiting parliamentary fellowship seminar series seminar series.

Contact Adele Biagi

Mon 03 February 2014, 17:00

'What ever happened with Transition in Central and Eastern Europe?'

Speaker: Alina Mungiu-Pippidi (The Hertie School of Governance, Berlin)

Venue:Seminar Room, European Studies Centre 70 Woodstock

Discussant: Othon Anastasakis (St Antony’s College, Oxford)

Chair:  Jonathan Scheele (St Antony’s College, Oxford)

This event is part of the SEESOX Seminar Series seminar series.

Fri 31 January 2014, 14:00

'Peacekeeping: What Works and Why?'

Speaker: Dr Jeni Whalen, General Sir Nick Parker and Professor Mats Berdal

Venue:Lecture Theatre, Blavatnik School of Government, 10 Merton Street, Oxford, OX1 4JJ

From Rwanda, Kosovo, and Sierra Leone to DR Congo, in the past two decades we have witnessed a series of international peacekeeping operations aiming to halt immediate violent conflict and lay the foundation for lasting peace. These operations must serve not only the international politics of their creation but also the fractured local societies they aim to transform. While the international face of peace operations has been widely analysed, we know much less about how they work at the local level.

Building on the accumulated experience of more than a decade of 'lesson learning' from United Nations peace operations and the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, this seminar asks: How do peace operations govern ‘on the ground’? Why do some peace operations work more effectively than others? How much local legitimacy do peace operations need to be effective, and how can they secure it in the midst of ongoing conflict and often violently contested local politics?
 
Panelists:

  • Dr Jeni Whalen, GEG Research Associate, Lecturer in International Security and Development at the University of New South Wales in Sydney, and author of How Peace Operations Work: Power, Legitimacy and Effectiveness (Oxford University Press, 2013)
  • General Sir Nick Parker, Senior Associate Fellow at the Royal United Services Institute (RUSI) and former British Army Officer who held senior posts in Northern Ireland, Sierra Leone, Iraq and Afghanistan
  • Professor Mats Berdal, Professor of Security and Development at King's College London

Fri 31 January 2014, 17:00

'The War That Ended Peace: The Road to 1914’

Speaker: Margaret MacMillan (St Antony’s College, Oxford)

Venue:Nissan Lecture Theatre, St. Antony's College

Please note that  seating is limited for the Warden’s Book Launch on Friday 31st January. If you wish to attend you need to register with Dorian Singh at dorian.singh@sant.ox.ac.uk by Thursday 30th January.

Author: Margaret MacMillan (St Antony’s College, Oxford)

Discussants: Paul Betts (St Antony’s College, Oxford), Adam Roberts (Balliol College, Oxford), Eugene Rogan (St Antony’s College, Oxford), Robert Service (St Antony’s College, Oxford)

Chair: Othon Anastasakis (St Antony’s College, Oxford)

 

Contact Dorian Singh

Wed 29 January 2014, 12:30

'Critical Social Innovation in the ‘Smart City’ era for a City-Regional European Horizon 2020'

Speaker: Igor Calzada (COMPAS)

Venue:Seminar Room, European Studies Centre 70 Woodstock

Chair: Kalypso Nicolaïdis (St Antony’s College, Oxford)

Lunch Provided

This event is part of the ESC Visiting Fellows Lunch-time Seminars seminar series.

Wed 29 January 2014, 17:00

'Legal Culture in the Process of Integration. Polish post-EU Accession migrants in the United Kingdom'

Speaker: Agnieszka Kubal (Centre for Socio-Legal Studies, Oxford)

Venue:Seminar Room, European Studies Centre 70 Woodstock

Discussant: Jan Fellerer (Wolfson College, Oxford)

Chair: Kalypso Nicolaïdis (St Antony’s College, Oxford)

This event is part of the Programme on Modern Poland (POMP) Seminar Series seminar series.

Tue 28 January 2014, 17:00

Challenging Technologies in the Information Age: 'Policing and security surveillance'

Speaker: Lord Alex Carlisle (former Official Independent Reviewer of Terrorism), Prof. David Omand (former Director of GCHQ) and Julian Huppert, MP

Venue:Nissan Lecture Theatre, St. Antony's College

CHALLENGING TECHNOLOGIES IN THE INFORMATION AGE: Challenges and Opportunities for the Individual and Nations around the World

Convenors: Lord Desmond Browne, Baroness Jane Bonham-Carter, Dr Phyllis Starkey and Professor Robert Service

Policing and security surveillance – who ensures the police and intelligence services are protectors of civil liberties not abusers of individual liberties?

Chair:  Robert Service

ALL ARE MOST WELCOME TO ATTEND

This event is part of the Visiting parliamentary fellowship seminar series seminar series.

Contact Adele Biagi

Mon 27 January 2014, 17:00

'The Eurozone crisis: An insider's view from Cyprus'

Speaker: Michalis Sarris (Former Finance Minister of Cyprus)

Venue:Seminar Room, European Studies Centre 70 Woodstock

Discussant: Max Watson (St Antony's College, Oxford)

Chair: Androulla Kaminara (St Antony's College, Oxford)

In association with PEFM

This event is part of the SEESOX Seminar Series seminar series.

Mon 27 January 2014, 17:00

'The Colombian Conflict: Spillover Effects and Expectations in the Andean Region'

Speaker: Simonetta Rossi, Former United Nations Peace and Development Advisor for Ecuador

Venue:Queen Elizabeth House, 3 Mansfield Road, Oxford OX1 3TB

Everyone is welcome. A drinks reception will follow the talk and discussion.

The current peace process between the Colombian government and the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) aims to bring to an end the decades-old armed internal conflict in Colombia. Simonetta Rossi will discuss the impact of the conflict in Colombia on its neighbours and the expectations in the Andean region from the current peace talks.

For information please contact: annette.idler@qeh.ox.ac.uk

Fri 24 January 2014, 12:30

'How to Become a Customer: Romania's Nuclear Acquisition Strategies, 1964-1979'

Speaker: Eliza Gheorghe (DPIR)

Venue:Seminar Room, European Studies Centre 70 Woodstock

Chair: Jonathan Scheele (St Antony's)

Lunch provided

This event is part of the ESC DPhil Lunchtime Seminar Series seminar series.

Fri 24 January 2014, 15:00

'The Global Liberal Order and its Future'

Speaker: Professor John Ikenberry (Princeton University and George Eastman Professor, Oxford University, 2013-2014 and Fellow of Balliol College) and Professor Andrew Hurrell (DPIR and Balliol College)

Venue:Lecture Theatre, Manor Road Building

This event is open to all. Online registration has now closed; there are a few places remaining, please contact Matthew Kennedy to register (registration for this event is mandatory in order to attend): matthew.kennedy@politics.ox.ac.uk

Chair: Professor Rosemary Foot, St Antony’s College, Oxford

Commentators: Ms Kate Brooks, Department of Politics and International Relations and Green Templeton College; and Mr Julian Gruin, Department of Politics and International Relations and St Antony’s College.

The workshop will be followed by a reception in the Common Room, Manor Road Building.

Contact Matthew Kennedy

Wed 22 January 2014, 12:30

'Opposing Europe inside the European Parliament: Which strategies for Eurosceptic MEPs?'

Speaker: Nathalie Brack (Department of Politics and International Relations, Oxford)

Venue:Seminar Room, European Studies Centre 70 Woodstock

Chair: Othon Anastasakis (St Antony’s College, Oxford)

Lunch Provided

This event is part of the ESC Visiting Fellows Lunch-time Seminars seminar series.

Tue 21 January 2014, 17:00

'Political and social change within countries'

Speaker: Theo Bertram (UK Policy Manager of Google), Simon Dukes (Chief Executive of CIFAS) and John Naughton (The Guardian Newspaper)

Venue:Nissan Lecture Theatre, St. Antony's College

CHALLENGING TECHNOLOGIES IN THE INFORMATION AGE: Challenges and Opportunities for the Individual and Nations around the World

Convenors:  Lord Desmond Browne, Baroness Jane Bonham-Carter, Dr Phyllis Starkey and Professor Robert Service

Political and social change within countries – do the new technologies increase accountability or strengthen state control around the world?  What positive measures deserve adoption?

Chair:  Des Browne

ALL ARE MOST WELCOME TO ATTEND

This event is part of the Visiting parliamentary fellowship seminar series seminar series.

Contact Adele Biagi

Mon 20 January 2014, 17:00

'Will the opening of the EU accession talks be a game changer in Serbian politics and what should we expect next?'

Speaker: Milica Delevic (EBRD) and Peter Sanfey (EBRD)

Venue:Seminar Room, European Studies Centre 70 Woodstock

Chair: Othon Anastasakis (St Antony’s College, Oxford)

This event is part of the SEESOX Seminar Series seminar series.

Fri 17 January 2014, 17:00

'A Schuman compact for the Euro Area'

Speaker: Ashoka Mody (Princeton)

Venue:Seminar Room, European Studies Centre 70 Woodstock

PEFM SEMINAR

Ashoka Mody is Charles and Marie Robertson Visiting Professor in International Economic Policy at the Woodrow Wilson School, Princeton University. Previously, he was Deputy Director in the International Monetary Fund’s Research and European Departments. He was responsible for the IMF’s Article IV consultations with Germany, Ireland, Switzerland, and Hungary, and also for the design of Ireland's financial rescue program. Earlier, at the World Bank, his management positions included those in Project Finance and Guarantees and in the Prospects Group, where he coordinated and was principal author of the Global Development Finance Report of 2001. He has advised governments worldwide on developmental and financial projects and policies, while writing extensively for policy and scholarly audiences. 

Discussant: David Vines (Balliol College, Oxford)

Chair: Kalypso Nicolaïdis (St Antony’s College, Oxford)

Contact Julie Adams

Thu 16 January 2014 to Fri 17 January 2014, 09:00

'Towards an International Society of the Future: World Perspectives on India’s Global Role'

Venue:St. Antony's College

All welcome.  For more information, please see the full programme. To register, please email indianstudies@area.ox.ac.uk

Sponsored by:

The Centre for International Studies, DPIR

Asian Studies, St Antony’s College

The Contemporary South Asian Studies Programme, SIAS

This workshop has two primary objectives. The first is to present an alternative set of reflections on India’s current place and role in the world to those narrated through standard Anglo-American analyses and conceptual frameworks. The second is to deepen and broaden our understanding of contemporary international society as it is experienced, understood, and shaped by a core group of ‘non-Western’ global stakeholders. In an era when the balance of power in the international system is shifting, the workshop as a whole asks how we can begin to understand relations between ‘other’ increasingly influential states who are already navigating, shaping and creating international institutions and processes in distinctive ways.

With the growth of India’s power and status, much of the world is thinking about India and its future role in international affairs. By treating the growing international influence of India as a common element of world politics, the workshop will unite Area Studies scholars in the analysis of India and in relation to a range of shared global issues, processes and institutions, such as climate change, development cooperation, UN Security Council reforms, nuclear politics, and the terms of world trade. Scholars of different regions will present country-specific readings of India’s rise from African, Brazilian, Central European, Chinese, Japanese, Mexican, Russian, South African, South Korean, and Syrian perspectives. Individually, the multi-country interpretive studies of linkages between India and other major, non-Western global stakeholders will offer a deeper understanding of how each country envisages its own role in an international society whose political, economic and social contours are shifting. Collectively, they will demonstrate the advantages and difficulties in pursuing ‘inter-area’ scholarship.

Each speaker will focus on a central issue of world politics and place emphasis on the governmental perspectives of the relevant country/ies in relation to India. Their discussion will therefore bridge the domestic-international divide, be of broad appeal across several disciplines—most obviously International Relations, Politics, and Economics—and offer alternative insights into India’s global role to policymakers and diplomats. Above all, by opening the conversation to a range of ‘alternative’ voices, the workshop as a whole will potentially offer new directions in the ways we create knowledge (within English language scholarship, at least) about the international realm.

Convenor: Kate Sullivan (kate.sullivan@area.ox.ac.uk), SIAS.

Contact Kate Sullivan

Mon 09 December 2013, 17:00

'The Mobiliastion of Non-citizens in Europe'

Speaker: Jennifer, Barrett (DPhil Candidate Department of International Development & St. Catherine's College)

Venue:Butler Room, Nuffield College

Conveners: Rima Majed & Olga Onuch

Discussant: Dr. Sophie, Heine (Lecturer Department of Politics & European Studies Centre)

This event is part of the Oxford Social Mobilisation Seminar seminar series.

Thu 05 December 2013 to Fri 06 December 2013, 09:00

'International Secretariats: Neutral Administrators or Policy Entrepreneurs?'

Venue:Nuffield College

International secretariats play a critical role within many international organisations. Their tasks, however, vary considerably. Some carry out simple conference management functions. Others give technical, legal and procedural advice. And yet others have exclusive agenda-setting, policy and implementation powers. The European Union has perhaps the most important secretariat, while the G8/20 does without a permanent secretariat and relies on the facilities of the host.

This conference contributes to our understanding of international organisations by examining the leadership roles of secretariats. It provides a unique comparative perspective. The presenters will draw on data from different policy domains (economic, environmental, and security cooperation), which allows the conference to draw broader conclusions on the role of the international secretariats.

Participation of the conference is open to all members of the Oxford community, but the number of places is limited. Therefore, please register in advance, by 1 December, via email with Dr Hylke Dijkstra (hylke.dijkstra@politics.ox.ac.uk). This conference is sponsored by the Department of Politics and International Relations (DPIR) and the Centre for International Studies (CIS).

Thursday 5 December

13:30

Hylke Dijkstra and Duncan Snidal (Oxford)

Introduction to the workshop

13:45 

Michael W. Manulak (Oxford)

Leading by Design: Entrepreneurship and International Secretariats

14:45

Mareike Kleine (LSE)

Reluctant heroes? A dynamic approach to principal-agent interaction

15:45

Coffee / Tea Break

16:15 

Steinar Andresen (Fridtjof Nansen Institute) and Steffen Bauer (German Development Institute)

Bureaucratic Leadership: The Missing Link to Understanding the Role and Relevance of International Secretariats

17:15

Derek Beach (Aarhus)

Leadership and the Council Secretariat of the European Union

Friday 6 December

9:00

Sebastian Mayer (Bremen)

NATO’s International Secretariat as a Bureaucratic Actor

10:00

Oliver Westerwinter (EUI)

The Informal Powers of International Secretariats: Informal Governance and Post-Conflict Peacebuilding in Burundi and Central African Republic

11:00

Coffee / Tea Break

11:30

Hylke Dijkstra (Oxford)

International Secretariats, Shadow Bureaucracies and the Control of International Organisations: Insights from UN Peacekeeping

12:30

Conclusion of the conference

Contact Dr Hylke Dijkstra

Thu 05 December 2013, 17:30

'Evolutionary Mechanisms in Business'

Speaker: Leszek Czarnecki (Chairman of the Supervisory Board of Getin Noble Bank)

Venue:Pavilion Room, Gateway Building, St. Antony's College

Programme on Modern Poland (By invitation only)

Convenor and Chair: Mikolaj Kunicki (St Antony’s College, Oxford)

Wed 04 December 2013, 13:00

'Conflict, Intervention and Social (Re)construction'

Speaker: Dr Dana Eyre (CIS Research Associate) and Whit Mason (CIS Research Associate)

Venue:Seminar Room, European Studies Centre 70 Woodstock

Introductory seminar of the project on Conflict, Intervention and Social (Re)construction (CISR)

Since the end of the Cold War, international interventions have increasingly tried to create stable, peaceful states aligned with the norms that underpin the international system. They have virtually always fallen short of their goals, often spectacularly so. Indecision about how to respond to the deepening catastrophe in Syria reflects this record of failure. The threats that have prompted interventions - to human security within states and to international security among them - seem unlikely to diminish. More effective forms of intervention are urgently needed.

CISR is predicated on the notion that conflict must be addressed in the minds of conflict actors and that both the disposition that perpetuates conflict and the disposition that underpins a coalition for peace result from social processes. The challenge for interveners is to understand how they can catalyse, shape and amplify the social processes that replace the social constructions that perpetuate conflict with those that sustain peace.

A number of fields have developed insights into the processes involved in such change. CISR will bring together these insights and, in collaboration with practitioners, consider what implications they have for how interventions - ranging from small state-building projects like the EU's rule of law mission in Georgia to huge civil-military occupations like Kosovo and Iraq - could be more effectively organised and carried out, or whether they might better be avoided altogether. 

In this introductory seminar, a presentation by Dana Eyre and Whit Mason on the assumptions and objectives of the project will be followed by a discussion of these matters and the project’s research agenda.

Lunch will be provided.

Dr. Dana Eyre, based in California, is a sociologist trained at Stanford University and a specialist in social change dynamics and social change leadership communications.  He has led sociologically informed, practically grounded research, analysis and strategy development efforts related to communications in conflict-affected environments around the world, including Iraq, Afghanistan and Somalia. With over a decade of on the ground experience in conflict zones stretching from the Balkans to Papua New Guinea, he has held senior roles with USAID in Iraq and as senior policy advisor to the UN and European Union in Kosovo. He has taught at the US Military Academy at West Point, the US Naval Postgraduate School, George Mason University, and for many years he has been an adjunct faculty member at the Pearson Peacekeeping Centre, Canada.

Whit Mason, an Australian/US national who lives in London, has over twenty years’ experience working as an analyst, and communications strategist in conflict-affected and politically complex environments, including Kosovo, Turkey, Iran, Afghanistan and Pakistan. He started his career reporting for and editing newspapers in Russia in the early nineties, worked as a journalist in Hong Kong and reported for CBS News from Sarajevo during and after the siege and from Seoul. He has been head of outreach and communications for USAID Pakistan, the UN’s regional justice coordinator in Kandahar, speechwriter and communications strategist for the UN Mission in Kosovo and Chief of Party for Internews in Azerbaijan, and advised Syrian opposition media. He was head of the research and lessons learned program in the Australian government’s intervention agency and has written extensively.

 

Tue 03 December 2013, 12:30

'Political Economy of Domestic and Global Monetary Institutions: A Developing Country Perspective’

Speaker: Hamza Ali Malik (Charles Wallace Trust Visiting Research Fellow, DPIR)

Venue:Seminar Room, European Studies Centre 70 Woodstock

A CIS and PEFM Event
Chaired by Max Watson (Director, Political Economy of Financial Markets Programme)

The recent global economic crisis has called into question the relevance of economic theory for policy. A fair share of the criticism has also been aimed at the role of domestic and global monetary institutions in contributing to the crisis. Surely, there have been efforts to adjust and tweak the existing models and to introduce a host of policy and institutional reforms. However, a deeper reflection is largely missing. This is especially true in developing economies where economic framework and institutional arrangements continue to be influenced by ideas imported from advanced economies and international organizations.

This talk is an effort in that direction by using the experiences of Pakistan's economy as an example. Specifically, it focuses on the ‘independence’ of central bank in the context of significant fiscal dominance of monetary policy and an almost continuous reliance on IMF financing to deal with a vulnerable balance of payments position. A deeper concern is with the accountability of monetary institutions, both domestic and global, in a nascent and budding democratic environment. In drawing some provisional lessons, the speaker relies on three distinct yet interrelated disciplines: history, politics, and philosophy.

Hamza Ali Malik is the Charles Wallace Trust visiting research fellow from Pakistan. He is director of the monetary policy department of the central bank of Pakistan and is a member of the Government of Pakistan’s team that holds regular consultations with the IMF.


 

Tue 03 December 2013, 17:00

‘Contestation and Adaptation: The Politics of National Identity in China'

Speaker: Dr Enze Han (SOAS)

Venue:Dahrendorf Room, Founder’s Building at St Antony’s

All are welcome

Convenor & Chair: Professor Rosemary Foot

 

This event is part of the China and East Asian Security seminar series.

Tue 03 December 2013, 17:00

'Freedom in diversity: 10 Lessons for public policy from Britain, Canada, France, Germany and the United States'

Venue:Seminar Room, European Studies Centre 70 Woodstock

Presentation of a research project by Timothy Garton Ash (St. Antony’s College, Oxford), Edward Mortimer (All Souls College, Oxford), Kerem Öktem (St. Antony’s College, Oxford), Paola Mattei (St. Antony’s College, Oxford), and Halbert Jones (St. Antony’s College, Oxford)

Joint session: as part of the North American Studies seminar series and the European Studies Centre Core Seminar; co-sponsored by the Dahrendorf Programme for the Study of Freedom

Convenor: Dr Halbert Jones

This event is part of the ESC Core Seminar Series seminar series.

Tue 03 December 2013, 17:00

POSTPONED: 'Conflict and peacemaking in Uganda'

Speaker: Mr Vincent Oling (Ugandan peace activist)

Venue:Manor Road Building, Seminar Room D

The following event, planned for Tuesday 3 Dec, is postponed until further notice:   

Conflict and peacemaking in Uganda, joint with Oxford Transitional Justice Research (OTJR).  Speaker:  Mr Vincent Oling, Ugandan peace activist and the founder of Uganda’s Concerned Parents Association in the aftermath of the Aboke Girls’ Abduction in 1996, and of several other development and post-war reconstruction-focused NGOs. Since 2004 he has been the acting Chairman of Facilitation for Peace and Development (FAPAD).

Mon 02 December 2013, 17:00

'Opportunities and Risks in the Financial Market Outlook'

Venue:Seminar Room, European Studies Centre 70 Woodstock

Panellists: Gillian Edgeworth (Unicredit), Gene Frieda (Moore Capital), Giles Moec (Deutsche Bank), Jacques Cailloux (Nomura International)
Chair: Adam Bennett (St. Antony’s College, Oxford)

This event is part of the PEFM Seminar Series seminar series.

Fri 29 November 2013, 08:45

'Serbia/Kosovo: The Brussels Agreements and Beyond'

Venue:Dahrendorf Room, Founder’s Building at St Antony’s

SEESOX Workshop (By invitation only)

Convenors: Richard Caplan (Linacre College, Oxford), James Ker-Lindsay (London School of Economics and Political Science), David Madden (St. Antony’s College)
(In association with DPIR and LSE)

Fri 29 November 2013, 14:00

CANCELLED: 'Is Monetary Union without Fiscal Union a Recipe for Disaster? Lessons from Europe and Africa'

Speaker: Kako Nubukpo (Oxford-Princeton Global Leaders Fellow), Paul Collier (Blavatnik School of Government) and Max Watson (St Antony’s College)

Venue:Lecture Theatre, Blavatnik School of Government, 10 Merton Street, Oxford, OX1 4JJ

This event has been cancelled.

Fri 29 November 2013, 18:00

'Serbia/Kosovo and the place of enlargement in EU foreign policy'

Speaker: Robert Cooper (European External Action Service, Counsellor)

Venue:Nissan Lecture Theatre, St. Antony's College

SEESOX Public Lecture

Chair: Othon Anastasakis (St. Antony’s College, Oxford)

Thu 28 November 2013, 13:30

'Summer of discontent: Citizen unrest and the politics of protest in South East Europe'

Venue:Fellows Dining Room, St Antony's College

SEESOX Workshop

Panellists: Othon Anastasakis (St Antony’s College, Oxford), Dimitar Bechev (European Council on Foreign Relations), Milos Damnjanovic( St Antony’s College, Oxford), Melis Evcimik (St Antony’s College, Oxford), Jessie Hronesova (St Antony’s College, Oxford), Saliha Metinsoy (Wadham College, Oxford), Kerem Öktem (St Antony’s College, Oxford), Olga Onuch (Nuffield College, Oxford), Ana Ranitovic (St John’s College, Oxford), Gwendolyn Sasse (Nuffield College, Oxford), Ebru Soytemel (Oxford Programme for the Future of Cities), Michael Willis (St Antony's College, Oxford.

Convenors: Othon Anastasakis (St. Antony's College, Oxford), Kerem Öktem (St. Antony's College, Oxford)

Please register your attendance with Julie Adams: julie.adams@sant.ox.ac.uk

Thu 28 November 2013, 16:00

'Negotiating an IMF programme: The Pakistan experience'

Speaker: Hamza Ali Malik

Venue:Oxford Centre for Islamic Studies, George Street

Hamza Malik is the Charles Wallace Trust Fellow for Pakistan based at the Department of Politics and International Relations, University of Oxford. As the Director of the Monetary Policy Department at the State Bank of Pakistan, he was the lead member of the team negotiating the recent IMF programme.

Converations in the Political Economy of the Middle East Seminar Series. This series aims to foster a continuing dialogue among scholars, students and practitioners interested in Middle East’s political economy. Departing from the usual seminar format, the series will offer an informal environment to foster discussion and debate among participants. Each session will begin with a 25 minutes introduction by the speaker, followed by an extended intellectual exchange with participants.

The Conversations is being launched under the auspices of the Globe Fellowship in the Economies of Muslim Societies based at the Oxford Centre for Islamic Studies.

Thu 28 November 2013, 17:00

'Social Mobilisation in Bolivia' (The presentation on 'Tensions, Challenges, and Contradictions within Sri Lanka's Post-war Civil Society Sector' has been cancelled)

Speaker: Dr. John Crabtree (Research Associate LAC & Senior Member St Antonys College)

Venue:Butler Room, Nuffield College

Conveners: Rima Majed & Olga Onuch

This seminar takes the format of two presentations.

Janel Smith's presentation ("Tensions, Challenges, and Contradictions within Sri Lanka's Post-war Civil Society Sector") has been cancelled due to an unforeseen emergency; therefore the seminar is expected to last around an hour. 

This event is part of the Oxford Social Mobilisation Seminar seminar series.

Wed 27 November 2013, 12:00

'Experiences and Results of the EU Presidency'

Speaker: Asta Skaisgiryte-Liauskiene (Ambassador of Lithuania)

Venue:Seminar Room, European Studies Centre 70 Woodstock

Chair: Ainius Lasas (St. Antony’s College, Oxford)

Tue 26 November 2013, 17:00

Richard von Weizsäcker Lecture: 'Violence, Economy and Empire: Cotton and Colonialism in German Togo'

Speaker: Rebekka Habermas (St. Antony’s College, Oxford)

Venue:Seminar Room, European Studies Centre 70 Woodstock

Chair: Paul Betts (St. Antony’s College, Oxford)

This event is part of the ESC Core Seminar Series seminar series.

Mon 25 November 2013, 09:15

'9th TurkMiS workshop: Towards New Migration Systems, Patterns and Policies in Eurasia: The Case of Turkey and the Russian Federation'

Venue:Ertegun House, St. Giles 37A, Oxford

SEESOX/COMPAS Workshop

Convenors: Franck Düvell (COMPAS) and Aysem Biriz Karacay (MiReKoc)

Changes in the global socio-politico-economic order bring about changes of the direction and magnitude of international migration and subsequently of the global migration order, and vice versa. This entails diverse challenges to policy, society and businesses notably with respect to accommodating and managing change. Whilst conventional perspectives have for long favoured research on the traditional receiving countries in Western Europe and North America, the rise of the BRICS states (Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa) and other countries has refocused attention to other old and new destination countries. Notably Russia, a major receiving country for traditional and new flows and Turkey which undergoes a transition from a migrant sending to a receiving country, emerge as supplements and competitors to the conventional receiving countries. Both are also increasingly linked together in a systemic manner encompassing a region that stretches from northern Africa to the far East. This workshop will specifically explore and conceptualise migration and mobility between the two countries.

Full programme

Places are limited. If you are interested in attending, please register with franck.duvell@compas.ox.ac.uk

Mon 25 November 2013, 17:00

'Political Extremism in the Interwar Period and its Economic Roots'

Speaker: Kevin O’Rourke (All Souls College, Oxford)

Venue:Seminar Room, European Studies Centre 70 Woodstock

Discussant: Othon Anastasakis (St. Antony’s College, Oxford)
Chair: Paul Betts (St. Antony’s College, Oxford)

This event is part of the PEFM Seminar Series seminar series.

Thu 21 November 2013, 17:00

'Water, power and peasant in contemporary China'

Speaker: Haiyan (Helen), Yu (DPhil Candidate Geography & St. Hilda's College)

Venue:Butler Room, Nuffield College

Conveners: Rima Majed & Olga Onuch

Discussant: Dr. David, Pettinicchio (Research Fellow, Sociology & Nuffield College)

This event is part of the Oxford Social Mobilisation Seminar seminar series.

Wed 20 November 2013, 08:30

'The Colombian Peace Talks: A Challenge for Security and Democracy?'

Venue:Pavilion Room, Gateway Building, St. Antony's College

All welcome, limited attendance (first come, first served based on registration). Registration for conference: £10 / additional cost of conference dinner: £24.  Register now at: http://www.oxforduniversitystores.co.uk/browse/extra_info.asp?compid=1&modid=2&deptid=250&catid=89&prodid=208

Please join us for our multidisciplinary one-day conference that explores the challenges of security and democracy for sustainable peace in Colombia, and draws lessons from other peace processes across the globe.  The conference is jointly organised by the Oxford Network of Peace Studies, the Latin American Centre and the Oxford Department of International Development. Further sponsors are the Embassy of Colombia in the UK and Canning House.  Distinguished guest panellists include:

  • Ingrid Betancourt, former presidential candidate and former hostage of the FARC
  • Fernando Carrillo, former Colombian Minister of the Interior (tbc)
  • John Dew, former Ambassador of the UK to Colombia (tbc)
  • Jorge Orlando Melo, Universidad Jorge Tadeo Lozano
  • Henry Patterson, University of Ulster
  • Mauricio Rubio, Universidad de Externado de Colombia
  • Markus Schultze-Kraft, University of Sussex

The conference will be followed by a conference dinner with speech by Mauricio Rodríguez Múnera, former Ambassador of Colombia to the UK. Further information and registration:  http://www.qeh.ox.ac.uk/events-1/xevent?diary_id=5353     

Conference convenor: Annette Idler (annette.idler@qeh.ox.ac.uk)

Contact Annette Idler

Tue 19 November 2013, 17:00

'China and the idea of "economic security"’

Speaker: Dr Amy King (Australian National University)

Venue:Dahrendorf Room, Founder’s Building at St Antony’s

All are welcome

Convenor & Chair: Professor Rosemary Foot

 

This event is part of the China and East Asian Security seminar series.

Tue 19 November 2013, 17:00

'Demoicratic Government: From Institutional Description to European Design'

Speaker: Francis Cheneval (Chair of Political Philosophy, University of Zurich)

Venue:Seminar Room, European Studies Centre 70 Woodstock

Discussants: Catherine De Vries (Lincoln College, Oxford), David Miller (Nuffield College, Oxford)
Chair: Kalypso Nicolaïdis (St. Antony’s College, Oxford)

This event is part of the ESC Core Seminar Series seminar series.

Mon 18 November 2013, 10:30

'(Economic) Justice beyond the State'

Speaker: Frank Garcia (Professor of Law, Boston College Law School) and Simon Caney (Professor in Political Theory, University of Oxford)

Venue:European Studies Centre

Co-sponsored by the Centre for International Studies, Global Economic Governance Programme, Department of Politics and International Relations. Convenors: Emily Jones, Kalypso Nicolaidis.

Please RSVP to: dorian.singh@sant.ox.ac.uk.

On the occasion of the publication of “Global Justice and International Economic Law” by Frank Garcia

10:30-11:00 Coffee – ESC Common Room

11:00-12:45 Panel 1: Global Justice and International Economic Law: Three Takes
Panelist: Frank Garcia, Professor of Law at the Boston College Law School and author of a new book ‘Three Takes Global Justice and International Economic Law: Three Takes’ (CUP 2013)
Discussants: David Miller (Professor of Political Theory, University of Oxford) and Emily Jones (Deputy Director Global Economic Governance Programme, University of Oxford)

13:00-14:00 Lunch – St Antony’s Dining Hall

14:00-15:30 Panel 2: Alternative Takes
Panelists: Simon Caney Professor in Political Theory, University of Oxford, et al

About the book:
Frank J. Garcia Global Justice and International Economic Law (CUP 2013). In this book, Professor Garcia proposes a new way to evaluate, construct and manage international trade – one that is based on norms of economic justice, comparative advantage and national interest.

Reviews:
“Frank Garcia… makes a genuine contribution to a pluralist conception of global justice by working through universal concepts in both language and law." Anne-Marie Slaughter, Princeton University
"The relationship between international economic law and global justice is surely one of the most crucial - but least studied - questions posed by globalization. With this important volume, legal scholar Frank Garcia steps into this scholarly void." Jeffrey L. Dunoff, Laura H. Carnell Professor of Law, Temple University Beasley School of Law

Mon 18 November 2013, 17:00

'The Newer EU States: Challenges and Opportunities in a Changing Financial Setting'

Speaker: Cristian Popa (National Bank of Romania)

Venue:Seminar Room, European Studies Centre 70 Woodstock

Discussant: Gillian Edgeworth (Unicredit)

Chair: Max Watson (St. Antony’s College, Oxford)

(In association with SEESOX)

This event is part of the PEFM Seminar Series seminar series.

Fri 15 November 2013, 14:00

'In the Wake of 'Land Grabs': Do we Need New Global Rules for Land Governance?'

Speaker: Akachi Odoemene, Robin Palmer and Lorenzo Cotula

Venue:Lecture Theatre, Blavatnik School of Government, 10 Merton Street, Oxford, OX1 4JJ

Large-scale land acquisitions in Africa have grabbed the attention of the world’s media in the past few years. Foreign investors, from private companies to sovereign wealth funds, have been leasing Africa’s land, a trend driven by higher world food prices and concerns about longer term food, energy and water security. Some argue that this investment is welcome and will support Africa’s growth while others argue that there are major negative consequences as local farmers lose their land.

This seminar asks: how should governments balance the competing needs for food and fuel? How should investment in land be regulated? Do we need new global rules or a code of conduct for land acquisitions by foreign investors?

Panelists:

- Akachi Odoemene, Oxford-Princeton Global Leaders Fellow and former lecturer at Redeemer’s University, Nigeria

- Robin Palmer, Global Land Rights Policy Specialist, Mokoro

- Lorenzo Cotula, Senior Researcher, International Institute for Environment & Development, author of ‘The Great African Land Grab’

For more information please visit the above website.

Thu 14 November 2013, 17:00

'The Arguments Anti-Deportation Campaigns in the UK'

Speaker: Diletta, Lauro (DPhil Candidate International Development & Lincoln College)

Venue:Butler Room, Nuffield College

Conveners: Rima Majed & Olga Onuch

This seminar takes the format of two presentations.  Second Speaker/Discussant TBC.

This event is part of the Oxford Social Mobilisation Seminar seminar series.

Wed 13 November 2013, 12:30

'Taking them to Task: Reflections on the Commission’s Task Force in Greece'

Speaker: Jens Bastian (Hellenic Foundation for European & Foreign Policy)

Venue:Seminar Room, European Studies Centre 70 Woodstock

Chair: David Madden (St. Antony’s College, Oxford)

From September 2011 to September 2013 Jens Bastian was appointed by the European Commission as a member of the Task Force for Greece in Athens, Greece. He had operational responsibility as a Policy Officer in project assistance management for asset privatization, financial sector developments, foreign direct investment and Greek – German bi-lateral economic relations. His previous professional experience includes working for the European Agency for Reconstruction, Thessaloniki, Greece, Alpha Bank in Athens, Greece, as well as academic affiliations with St. Antony’s College, Oxford, U.K., Nuffield College, Oxford and the London School of Economics, London, U.K. Dr Bastian was the SEESOX-Alpha Bank Visiting Fellow at St Antony's College for 2010-11.

Lunch provided

This event is part of the SEESOX Seminar Series seminar series.

Tue 12 November 2013, 17:00

‘Chinese participation in the global nuclear order: from regional proliferation challenges to multilateral arms control’

Speaker: Dr Nicola Horsburgh (Oxford University)

Venue:Dahrendorf Room, Founder’s Building at St Antony’s

Dr Nicola Horsburgh is a British Academy Postdoctoral Fellow based at the Oxford Institute for Ethics, Law and Armed Conflict (ELAC) at the Department of Politics and International Relations at Oxford. She is also attached as a Fellow to the Asian Studies Centre at St. Antony’s College. Her BA research project is titled 'China and Nuclear Responsibility in the Global Nuclear Order' and explores what it means to be a responsible nuclear armed state, with a special emphasis on China. She is currently preparing a monograph of her doctoral thesis on China’s engagement with global nuclear order since 1949. Nicola holds a DPhil in International Relations from Oxford, an MPhil in Modern Chinese Studies from Oxford, an MSc in International Relations from the London School of Economics and Political Science, and a BScEcon (Hons) in International Politics and Strategic Studies from Aberystwyth University.

All are welcome

Convenor & Chair: Professor Rosemary Foot

 

This event is part of the China and East Asian Security seminar series.

Tue 12 November 2013, 17:00

'The Threats of Populism: Europe’s Reluctant Radicals'

Speaker: Catherine Fieschi and Marley Morris (Counterpoint)

Venue:Seminar Room, European Studies Centre 70 Woodstock

Discussant: Tryfon Bampilis (St. Antony’s, Oxford)

Chair: Othon Anastasakis (St. Antony’s College, Oxford)

  • Catherine Fieschi is the director of Counterpoint. She holds a PhD in Comparative Political Science from McGill University and is the author of In the Shadow of Democracy: Fascism, populism and the French Third Republic and numerous pamphlets and articles on extremism, populism, and identity politics.
  • Marley Morris is a researcher at Counterpoint on the 'Reluctant Radicals' project and is a co-author of the report 'Recapturing the Reluctant Radical: How to win back Europe's populist vote'. Prior to Counterpoint, he was at the Violence and Extremism programme at Demos.
  • Tryfon Bampilis holds a PhD in Cultural Anthropology from the University of Leiden. He is currently the SEESOX/A.G Leventis visiting fellow, researching the rise of far-right in Greece in relation to migration and the current economic crisis.

Please join us for coffee and an informal chat at 4.30pm in the Common Room prior to the seminar.

This event is part of the ESC Core Seminar Series seminar series.

Tue 12 November 2013, 20:00

‘Can Journalists help build Peace?’

Speaker: Prof Jake Lynch (former BBC journalist,now Associate Professor and Director of the Centre for Peace and Conflict Studies, University of Sydney)

Venue:Queen Elizabeth House, 3 Mansfield Road, Oxford OX1 3TB

OxPeace Event

Illustrated talk, including a portion of Jake’s recent film: “Peace Journalism in Mexico”. 

A drinks reception will follow the talk and discussion

Peace Journalism is growing, both as a worldwide reform movement and as a field of scholarship. Jake Lynch will discuss the latest findings, drawing on his recently completed research project, “A Global Standard for Reporting Conflict”, just published by Routledge as a book of the same name. He will describe the Peace Journalism movement and assess its potential significance.

Jake Lynch is the most published and cited author in the field of Peace Journalism. Before taking up an academic post, Jake enjoyed a 17-year career in professional journalism, with spells as a Political Correspondent at Westminster, and a resident Foreign Correspondent (for the Independent, in Sydney), culminating in a role as an on-air presenter for BBC World Television News, for whom he anchored over 1,000 half-hour news bulletins.

Mon 11 November 2013, 17:00

'The Greek Debt Restructuring: Implications for the Future'

Speaker: Jeromin Zettelmeyer (European Bank of Reconstruction and Development)

Venue:Seminar Room, European Studies Centre 70 Woodstock

Discussant: Jens Bastian (Hellenic Foundation for European & Foreign Policy)
Chair: Russell Kincaid (St. Antony’s College)
(In association with SEESOX)

This event is part of the PEFM Seminar Series seminar series.

Thu 07 November 2013, 17:00

'Has Protest Increased Since the 1970s? How a Survey Question Can Construct a Spurious Trend' and 'The Forgotten Rainbow of AIDS Activism'

Speaker: Dr. Michael Biggs (University Lecturer in Sociology & St. Cross College) and Victor Yang (DPhil Candidate, DPIR & St. John's College)

Venue:Butler Room, Nuffield College

Conveners: Rima Majed & Olga Onuch

This seminar takes the format of two presentations.  The full title for Victor, Yang's presentaion is: 'The Forgotten Rainbow of AIDS Activism: People of Colour and Racial Consciousness in U.S. Social Movement Organisations'

This event is part of the Oxford Social Mobilisation Seminar seminar series.

Wed 06 November 2013, 13:00

'Identity and International Security: U.S. Relations with China and India’

Speaker: Jarrod Hayes (Former Senior Advisor for Innovation in the Office of Secretary of State Hillary Clinton)

Venue:Manor Road Building, Seminar Room A

Jarrod Hayes will be discussing his first book 'Constructing National Security: US Relations with India and China' (Cambridge University Press, 2013).

Tue 05 November 2013, 17:00

‘China's management of anti-Japanese protests, 1985-2013’

Speaker: Professor Jessica Weiss (Yale University)

Venue:Dahrendorf Room, Founder’s Building at St Antony’s

All are welcome

Convenor & Chair: Professor Rosemary Foot

 

This event is part of the China and East Asian Security seminar series.

Tue 05 November 2013, 17:00

'Representing ‘National’ Interests in Uncertain Times – The Council and European Council'

Speaker: Kenneth Armstrong (Professor of European Law, University of Cambridge)

Venue:Seminar Room, European Studies Centre 70 Woodstock

Discussant: Pavlos Eleftheriadis (Mansfield College, Oxford) and Stephen Weatherill (Somerville College, Oxford)
Chair: Cathryn Costello (St. Antony’s College, Oxford)

This event is part of the ESC Core Seminar Series seminar series.

Mon 04 November 2013, 17:00

'Can Banking Union Save the Euro Area?'

Speaker: Gabriel Gloeckler (European Central Bank)

Venue:Seminar Room, European Studies Centre 70 Woodstock

Discussant: Stewart Fleming (St. Antony’s College, Oxford)
Chair: Kalypso Nicolaïdis (St. Antony’s College, Oxford)

This event is part of the PEFM Seminar Series seminar series.

Thu 31 October 2013, 16:30

Film and Panel Discussion: '“Unmixing Peoples”: An Assessment of the 1923 Treaty of Lausanne'

Venue:Seminar Room, European Studies Centre 70 Woodstock

90th Anniversary Event. The documentary ‘Twice a Stranger’ will be screened, followed by a panel discussion.

Panellists: Ayca Abakan (BBC), Renée Hirschon (St. Peter’s College, Oxford), Michael Llewellyn Smith (St. Antony’s College, Oxford) , Victoria Solomonides (King’s College, London), Chair: Othon Anastasakis (St Antony’s College, Oxford), Convenor: Renée Hirschon (St. Peter’s College, Oxford) (In association with the Sub-Faculty of Byzantine and Modern Greek), followed by a reception in the Common Room.

Thu 31 October 2013, 17:00

CANCELLED: 'Revolution and Counter-Revolution through the Prism of the Internet' and 'London Riots: Violence as a Repertoire'

Speaker: Dr. Miriyam Aouragh (Associate Member of the Oriental Insitute, University of Oxford); Juta Kawalerowicz (DPhil Candidate, Sociology & Nuffield College)

Venue:Butler Room, Nuffield College

Dear colleagues and friends, 

In support of the rightful strike taking place across the UK, the Oxford Social Mobilisation Seminar will be cancelled today.

We are sorry about this short notice, but as a group concerned with social mobilisation we feel that solidarity with our staff and teachers is crucial. 

Best, 

Olga and Rima 

 


 

Conveners: Rima Majed & Olga Onuch

This seminar takes the format of two presentations.

This event is part of the Oxford Social Mobilisation Seminar seminar series.

Wed 30 October 2013, 14:00

'Vice President of Indonesia to deliver GEG Special Address'

Speaker: His Excellency Dr. Boediono (Vice President of the Republic of Indonesia)

Venue:Examination Schools

On 30 October GEG will welcome His Excellency Dr. Boediono, Vice President of the Republic of Indonesia, to deliver a Special Address entitled “Transforming Indonesia: The Challenges of Good Governance and Economic Development“.

In this lecture co-hosted by the Global Economic Governance Programme and the Blavatnik School of Government, H.E. Dr. Boediono will draw on his extensive experience in public service – as Minister of Finance (2001-2004), Coordinating Minister for the Economy (2005-2008), Governor of the Bank of Indonesia (2008-2009) and Vice President (2009-present) – to discuss the challenges facing Indonesia’s development as the country seeks to ensure strong economic growth and accountable, democratic governance.

Places are limited and advance registration is required. Click here to register your interest via EventBrite with your Oxford email address, and we will respond to you by 25 October at the latest to confirm your place. Proof of registration and a Bodleian ID card will need to be shown on arrival.

If you have any questions please contact gegevents@univ.ox.ac.uk.

Wed 30 October 2013, 18:30

'Ethnicity and Experiences of Conflict in Burma'

Venue:Nissan Lecture Theatre, St. Antony's College

An Informal Roundtable Discussion hosted by the Oxford Burma Alliance and the Asian Studies Centre, St Antony's College with:

Matthew J Walton (Aung San Suu Kyi Senior Research Fellow in Modern Burmese Studies, St Antony's College)
Nbyen Dan Hkung Awng (Charles Wallace Trust Visiting Research Fellow, DPIR)
Paing Soe Hlaing (President of the Oxford Burma Alliance)
Karen Hargrave (Vice President of the Oxford Burma Alliance)


The dominant narrative of the current political transition in Burma appears to be gradually becoming more positive, as formerly critical Western countries deepen their engagement with the country through encouraging investment and even initiating limited military-military relations. However, civil conflict continues in many border areas of the country, inhabited mostly by members of ethnic minority groups. And despite national and international pressure for a nation-wide ceasefire, most resistance groups remain deeply skeptical of the new Burmese government's capacity and sincerity with regard to instituting political reforms that would address the grievances of marginalized ethnic communities.

The participants in this roundtable will address the question of how ethnic identity affects people's experiences of conflict in Burma. Matt Walton will discuss ethnicity and differential experiences of suffering more broadly as well as the ways in which geography plays a role in mediating the effects of government/military repression. Dan Hkung will consider the Kachin struggle, a case of particular importance at present as the intensification of conflict in Kachin state has occurred alongside the widely praised "democratic" reforms of the new Burmese government. Paing Soe Hlaing and Karen Hargrave will discuss Mon perspectives on ethnic identity, conflict and political transition. Paing will relate his own experiences of the challenges of negotiating mixed Mon-Burman heritage, whilst Karen will share the perspectives of Mon friends and colleagues working to advance human rights for this ethnic population.

For more information, please contact: matthew.walton@sant.ox.ac.uk

 

Tue 29 October 2013, 17:00

‘China's War with Japan 1937-1945: the Struggle for Survival’

Speaker: Professor Rana Mitter (St Cross, Oxford)

Venue:Dahrendorf Room, Founder’s Building at St Antony’s

All are welcome

Convenor & Chair: Professor Rosemary Foot

 

This event is part of the China and East Asian Security seminar series.

Tue 29 October 2013, 17:00

'The Passage to Europe: At the Heart of Power'

Speaker: Luuk van Middelaar (Member of the Cabinet of the President of the European Council)

Venue:Seminar Room, European Studies Centre 70 Woodstock

On the occasion of the publication of the English translation of his book “Passage to Europe: How a Continent Became a Union” which received the European Book Prize Award 2012.
Discussants: Hartmut Mayer (St. Peter’s College, Oxford), Kalypso Nicolaïdis (St. Antony’s College, Oxford)
Chair: Othon Anastasakis (St Antony’s College, Oxford)

Luuk van Middelaar is a Dutch historian and political philosopher who was a member of the People's Party for Freedom and Democracy, which is the biggest conservative-liberal formation in the Netherlands. He has been a member of the cabinet of Herman Van Rompuy, the President of the European Council since 2009. He studied history and philosophy at the University of Groningen and the Centre Raymond Aron of the École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales in Paris. He was awarded the Prix de Paris (Prize of Paris) in 1999 and the Prijs voor de Vrijheid (Prize of Liberty) in 2002 for his contributions to liberal thought, and in December 2012 he was awarded the European Book Prize for The passage to Europe - History of a Beginning.

Please join us for coffee and an informal chat at 4.30pm in the Common Room prior to the seminar.

This event is part of the ESC Core Seminar Series seminar series.

Mon 28 October 2013, 17:00

POSTPONED: 'PEFM seminar'

Speaker: Paul Tucker (former Deputy Governor of the Bank of England)

Venue:European Studies Centre

PLEASE NOTE: We are postponing the provisionally planned seminar by Paul Tucker, former Deputy Governor of the Bank of England, until after his return from the fellowship that he is taking up at Harvard for the rest of this academic year.

There will therefore be no PEFM seminar on October 28th.

Tue 22 October 2013, 12:30

'The Future of the Far Right Greece: Dawn or Dusk?'

Speaker: Tryfon Bampilis (St. Antony’s College, Oxford)

Venue:Seminar Room, European Studies Centre 70 Woodstock

Chair: Androulla Kaminara (St. Antony’s College, Oxford)

Lunch provided.

This event is part of the SEESOX Seminar Series seminar series.

Tue 22 October 2013, 17:00

'A Past Still Relevant? The Lessons of WWI for Contemporary East Asia'

Speaker: Dr Todd Hall (St Anne’s College, Oxford)

Venue:Dahrendorf Room, Founder’s Building at St Antony’s

Dr. Todd Hall earned his Ph.D. from the University of Chicago in 2008 and has held post-doctoral fellowships at Princeton and Harvard, as well as visiting scholar appointments at the Free University of Berlin and Tsinghua University in Beijing.  Prior to joining the University of Oxford, Dr. Hall held the position of Assistant Professor in Political Science at the University of Toronto (2010-2013).  Research interests extend to the areas of international relations theory; the intersection of emotion, affect, and foreign policy; and Chinese foreign policy.  Recent publications include articles in Political Science Quarterly (2012), International Studies Quarterly (2012, co-authored with Keren Yarhi-Milo), Security Studies (2011), Waijiao Pinglun (2011), and The Chinese Journal of International Politics (2010).  Dr. Hall is currently working on a book manuscript that examines the role of state-level emotional behaviour in international relations entitled Emotional Diplomacy: Official Emotion on the International Stage.

All are welcome

Convenor & Chair: Professor Rosemary Foot

 

This event is part of the China and East Asian Security seminar series.

Tue 22 October 2013, 17:00

'Communicating Europe in Member States: The Impossible Task?'

Speaker: Gaetane Ricard-Nihoul (European Commission’s Representation in Paris and former Secretary General at Notre Europe, Paris)

Venue:Seminar Room, European Studies Centre 70 Woodstock

Author of, “For a European Federation of Nation States: Jacques Delors’ Vision Revisited”

Discussants: Graham Avery (St. Antony’s College, Oxford), Paul Flather (Europaeum), Jonathan Scheele (St. Antony’s College, Oxford)

Chair: Kalypso Nicolaïdis (St. Antony’s College, Oxford)

This event is part of the ESC Core Seminar Series seminar series.

Mon 21 October 2013, 13:00

'"A torch of fire, a cup of water": Myanmar between Democratization and Ethnic War'

Speaker: Nbyen Dan Hkung Awng (Charles Wallace Trust Visiting Research Fellow, DPIR)

Venue:Lecture Theatre, Manor Road Building

The democratization of Myanmar is a highly contentious topic. Whilst being praised for its recent reforms, the country continues to experience mass displacement, war between ethnic groups and religious conflict. Moreover, China has begun to intervene within the country, notably between the government and the Kachin Independence Organization. What has been the evidence to date that the government has been working towards the kind of peace that embraces deep diversity? Why has China intervened in the internal affairs of a country that has been applauded for its recent liberalization? And are China and the West assisting or hindering peace in Myanmar against the backdrop of wider geopolitical games?

Nbyen Dan Hkung Awng is the 2013 Charles Wallace Trust Visiting Research Fellow at CIS, Department of Politics and International Relations. He is the Director of the Humanity Institute, which promotes human rights and inclusive political change in Kachin and the Northern Shan States in Myanmar. He is originally from the Kachin State and has been involved in peace building as well as educational projects in Myanmar. He is looking forward to using his stay to build long term bridges with Oxford and can be contacted at danhkung@gmail.com

A day-long photo exhibit exploring the themes of the event will be held in the Manor Road Building on the day of the event.

For further information about this event please contact: matthew.kennedy@politics.ox.ac.uk

Contact Matthew Kennedy

Mon 21 October 2013, 17:00

'Restoring Confidence in the Euro Area'

Speaker: Klaus Regling (European Stability Mechanism)

Venue:Seminar Room, European Studies Centre 70 Woodstock

Discussant: Russell Kincaid (St Antony’s College, Oxford)
Chair: Max Watson (St Antony's College, Oxford)

This event is part of the PEFM Seminar Series seminar series.

Fri 18 October 2013, 14:00

'Economic Reform in China and Vietnam: Does Accession to International Trade Agreements Help or Hinder?'

Speaker: Dr. Tu Anh Vu (Oxford-Princeton Global Leaders Fellow), Professor Shaun Breslin (University of Warwick) and Dr. Eric Thun (Sa?d Business School)

Venue:Lecture Theatre, Blavatnik School of Government, 10 Merton Street, Oxford, OX1 4JJ

Since 2000, China and Vietnam have both acceded to the WTO and they are engaged in a number of regional trade initiatives. In this seminar, three experts will explore the links between integration into the global economy and domestic economic reforms. Questions they will address include: How does accession to international trade agreements shape and modify economic and political institutions? How successful have governments been in using accession to pursue domestic reforms? How are the rules and values of global economic institutions defined and adapted to the domestic context?

Panellists:

Dr. Tu Anh Vu, Oxford-Princeton Global Leaders Fellow and former Director of Research, Fulbright Economics Teaching Program, Vietnam

Professor Shaun Breslin, Professor of Politics and International Studies and China Specialist, University of Warwick

Dr. Eric Thun, Peter Moores University Lecturer in Chinese Business at Sa?d Business School

 

 

Tue 15 October 2013, 17:00

'China's Maritime Power and the South China Sea'

Speaker: Dr Katherine Morton (Australian National University)

Venue:Dahrendorf Room, Founder’s Building at St Antony’s

Dr Katherine Morton is Associate Dean at the Research College of Asia and the Pacific, and Senior Fellow, Department of International Relations, School of International, Political & Strategic Studies at Australian National University.

Dr Morton is a specialist on China's domestic politics and international relations with a particular focus on environmental governance, non-traditional and human security, and the role of NGOs and civil society. Her book on International Aid and China's Environment was the first academic study on the effectiveness of international ideas and practices in building capacity to address environmental problems in China. For the past six years she has been conducting research on the Tibetan Plateau looking at the impacts of climate change and the implications for water security. Other research projects include a study on the domestic drivers of China's response to global governance; and regional ecological security.

She is also the Chief Investigator in a Ford Foundation-funded collaborative research project on Sino-Australian security relations. She speaks French, Italian, Mandarin, intermediate Japanese, and she is now learning Tibetan.

All are welcome

Convenor & Chair: Professor Rosemary Foot

 

This event is part of the China and East Asian Security seminar series.

Tue 15 October 2013, 17:00

'(Re)Constructing EU Legitimacy at Times of Crisis'

Speaker: Claudia Schrag Sternberg (St. Hugh’s, Oxford)

Venue:Seminar Room, European Studies Centre 70 Woodstock

On the occasion of the publication of her book, “Struggle for Legitimacy in the EU: Public Contestation 1950-2005”

Discussants:

Elizabeth Frazer (New College, Oxford)

Sophie Heine (Universite Libre de Bruxelles)

Mathieu Segers (DPIR, Oxford)

Chair: Othon Anastasakis (St Antony’s College)

This event is part of the ESC Core Seminar Series seminar series.

Mon 14 October 2013, 12:30

'An insider’s view of Greece’s Euro crisis: Why the road to redemption must also be paved with skilful intentions'

Speaker: Constantinos Papadopoulos (Eurobank, Greece)

Venue:Seminar Room, European Studies Centre 70 Woodstock

Convenors: Othon Anastasakis (St. Antony’s College, Oxford) and Kalypso Nicolaïdis (St. Antony’s College, Oxford)

Constantine Papadopoulos is Advisor on European Affairs at Eurobank EFG since 1998. In this capacity he advises the Bank’s management on political and economic developments in South Eastern and Central Europe, as well as in the European Union. Between 1986 and 1998 he was a career diplomat with a special interest in EU affairs.

Dr Papadopoulos is a Fellow of the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, Harvard University. He has taught and published various articles in the areas of economic integration and international politics and economics. He is co-author of Eurobank’s “Greek Economic Bi-weekly” and quarterly “Macro Monitor”. He holds a BA, MA and D.Phil (1982) degree in Economics from the University of Sussex, England.

Lunch Provided.

This event is part of the SEESOX Seminar Series seminar series.

Mon 14 October 2013, 17:00

'Banking reform five years on'

Speaker: Sir John Vickers (Warden, All Soul’s College, Oxford)

Venue:Seminar Room, European Studies Centre 70 Woodstock

Chair: Max Watson (St Antony’s College, Oxford)

Mon 24 June 2013, 14:00

'Shadow Banking, Financial Risk and Regulation in China and other Developing Countries'

Speaker: Professor Steven Schwarcz (Stanley A. Star Professor of Law & Business, Duke University School of Law)

Venue:Blavatnik School of Government, 10 Merton Street,

This special Seminar is co-hosted by the Globalization and Finance Project and the Political Economy of Financial Markets Programme (PEFM). This is a small, closed seminar, please email geg@univ.ox.ac.uk if you would like to join.

Is the rapid growth of shadow banking placing China and other developing countries at increased risk of financial crisis? Shadow banking is growing rapidly in a number of emerging and developing countries, including China, where lending by non-bank institutions is now thought to be as large as lending by banks. The shadow banking sector in developing economies is typically weakly regulated, and the growth of the sector poses risks to financial stability. Yet, some argue that shadow banking is an important channel of alternative funding to emerging and developing economies, particularly in the face of significant retrenchment by European banks. In this seminar, Professor Schwartz will examine the impact of shadow banking on financial market and systemic risk in developing countries, and explore whether and, if so how, the sector should be regulated.

Professor Steven Schwarcz is the Stanley A. Star Professor of Law & Business, Duke University School of Law and Founding Director of Duke’s interdisciplinary Global Capital Markets Center. His areas of research and scholarship include insolvency and bankruptcy law; international finance, capital markets, and systemic risk; and commercial law. Prior to joining the Duke faculty, he was a partner at two leading international law firms, where he represented top banks and other financial institutions in structuring innovative capital market financing transactions, both domestic and international.

Wed 12 June 2013, 17:00

'Energy meets politics in the Eastern Mediterranean'

Speaker: Androulla Kaminara (St Antony’s College, Oxford)

Venue:Seminar Room, European Studies Centre 70 Woodstock

Chair: David Madden

In association with European Studies Centre

This event is part of the SEESOX Seminar Series seminar series.

Tue 11 June 2013, 16:00

'Shaping Europe's Destiny: Vision and Opportunities'

Speaker: Professor Philippe Van Parijs

Venue:Manor Road Building, Seminar Room A

Discussants: Dr. Pavlos Eleftheriadis (Faculty of Law, Oxford), Professor David Miller (DPIR, Oxford), Luuk Van Middelaar (Advisor and Speechwriter to the European Council President, Herman Van Rompuy) and Professor Kalypso Nicolaidis (DPIR, Oxford).

This event is part of the Justice and Democracy beyond the Nation-State: Lessons From and For Europe seminar series.

Mon 10 June 2013, 17:00

'The limits of neoliberal conservatism: Taksim Square and a new deal in Turkey?'

Speaker: Kerem Oktem (St Antony’s College, Oxford)

Venue:Seminar Room, European Studies Centre 70 Woodstock

Chair: Dimitrios Gkintidis (St Antony’s College, Oxford)

This event is part of the SEESOX Seminar Series seminar series.

Mon 10 June 2013, 17:00

'Inequality and Regime Change: Democratic Transitions and the Stability of Democratic Rule'

Speaker: Professor Robert Kaufman (Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)

Venue:Clay Room, Nuffield College

Fri 07 June 2013, 11:00

'Symposium on Social Mobilization at the University of Oxford'

Venue:Dahrendorf Room, Founder’s Building at St Antony’s

This event takes place in the Dahrendorf room, St Antony’s College and the African Studies Centre, 13 Bevington Road.

The full programme for this event can be found here.

Please register (if you have not already) by e-mailing olga.onuch@lac.ox.ac.uk

Contact Olga Onuch

Fri 07 June 2013, 15:00

‘Normative Political Theory and the EU: Should we take the EU as it is, or as it ideally ought to be?’

Speaker: Andrea Sangiovanni (Kings’ College, London)

Venue:Law Board Room, St Cross Building, St. Cross Road

Discussant: Professor Philippe Van Parijs

This event is part of the Justice and Democracy beyond the Nation-State: Lessons From and For Europe seminar series.

Thu 06 June 2013, 12:00

'Open Budgets: The Political Economy of Transparency, Participation, and Accountability'

Speaker: Paolo de Renzio

Venue:Rhodes House, South Parks Road, City Centre, Oxford OX1 3RG

How and why do improvements in fiscal transparency and participation come about? How are they sustained over time? When and how do increased fiscal transparency and participation lead to improved government responsiveness and accountability? In this lunchtime seminar, GEG researcher Dr Paolo de Renzio will discuss these and other tough questions about fiscal transparency and participation. The seminar is based around the new book Open Budgets: The Political Economy of Transparency, Participation, and Accountability, which de Renzio co-edited with Sanjeev Khagram and Archon Fung.  Dr Diego Sanchez Ancochea will be discussant. Sandwiches provided. 

Mon 03 June 2013, 17:00

'Cross border banking in the balance'

Speaker: Erik Berglof (Chief Economist and Special Adviser to the President of the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD))

Venue:Seminar Room, European Studies Centre 70 Woodstock

Political Economy of Financial Markets (PEFM) Seminar

Chaired by Max Watson (Director, Political Economy of Financial Markets programme, St Antony's College, Oxford)

Erik Berglöf is the Chief Economist and Special Adviser to the President of the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD). He is a widely published and internationally respected specialist in the field of transition economics, as well as financial contracting, corporate governance, financial development and EU reform. As expert on policy-related issues in transition economies, he has regularly provided advice to national governments and international institutions including the International Monetary Fund (IMF), the World Bank and OECD.

Prior to joining the EBRD in 2006, Erik Berglöf held the position of Director of the Stockholm Institute of Transition Economics (SITE) and Professor at the Stockholm School of Economics. He was previously Assistant Professor at the Université Libre de Bruxelles and has held visiting positions at Harvard, Stanford and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). He was the founder and President of the Centre for Economic and Financial Research (CEFIR) in Moscow.

Erik Berglöf was also Programme Director at the Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR) in London.  Currently, he is Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institution in Washington, D.C., Board Member and Research Fellow of the European Corporate Governance Institute, Board Member of the New Economic School in Moscow, Board Member of the Institute for New Economic Thinking in New York, and Trustee of the Bianca Jagger Human Rights Foundation. In 2013 he was awarded the Leontief Medal "for contributions to economic reform".

Fri 31 May 2013, 15:00

'Fundamental Issues in the Crisis of the Eurozone’

Speaker: Yannis Manuelides (Allen & Overy) and Philip Wood QC (Allen & Overy & visiting professor, Oxford University)

Venue:Law Board Room, St Cross Building, St. Cross Road

This event is part of the Justice and Democracy beyond the Nation-State: Lessons From and For Europe seminar series.

Fri 31 May 2013, 17:00

'The new Turkish foreign policy in the age of Arab revolutions: Between ethics and self-interest'

Speaker: Ziya Önis (Koç University, Istanbul)

Venue:Seminar Room, European Studies Centre 70 Woodstock

Chair: Kerem Öktem (St Antony’s College, Oxford)

This event is part of the SEESOX Seminar Series seminar series.

Fri 31 May 2013, 17:00

Book: 'Development Aid Confronts Politics: The Almost Revolution'

Speaker: Thomas Carothers and Diane de Gramont (authors)

Venue:Lecture Theatre, Blavatnik School of Government, 10 Merton Street, Oxford, OX1 4JJ

After decades of denial, the development community now acknowledges that effective assistance requires grappling with the domestic politics of recipient countries. Development agencies are openly promoting political goals alongside traditional socioeconomic ones and trying to apply politically smart methods. Yet considerable controversy and confusion accompany this potential revolution in development aid. In Development Aid Confronts Politics, Thomas Carothers and Diane de Gramont ask whether aid can achieve a productive synthesis of political and socioeconomic concerns. In this seminar, the authors will discuss their provocative findings with Ngaire Woods.

Thomas Carothers is vice president for studies at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace and director of Carnegie’s Democracy and Rule of Law Program. He is author of Aiding Democracy Abroad;  Promoting the Rule of Law Abroad: In Search of Knowledge; and Confronting the Weakest Link: Aiding Political Parties in New Democracies.

Diane de Gramont, a Clarendon Scholar at Oxford University, was previously a researcher in the Democracy and Rule of Law Program of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.

Wed 29 May 2013, 16:00

'Matthew Eagleton-Pierce Book Launch: Symbolic Power in the World Trade Organization'

Speaker: Matthew Eagleton-Pierce (Lecturer in International Relations, University of Exeter)

Venue:Manor Road Building, Seminar Room A

Matthew Eagleton-Pierce is a Lecturer in International Relations at the University of Exeter. He previously taught at the London School of Economics and the University of Oxford. His research interests lie within the field of international political economy and international political sociology. His first monograph, Symbolic Power in the World Trade Organization (Oxford University Press, 2013) examines the relationship between power, language, and practices of legitimation in world trade. The event serves as an opportunity to debate questions arising from the book.

The discussants will be Valéria Guimarães de Lima e Silva (Global Research Fellow, Hauser Global Law School Program, NYU) and Thomas Hale (Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Blavatnik School of Government, Oxford).

The event will be chaired by Kalypso Nicolaidis (DPIR, Oxford).

A summary of the book is as follows:

Questions of power are central to understanding global trade politics and no account of the World Trade Organization (WTO) can afford to avoid at least an acknowledgment of the concept. A closer examination of power can help us to explain why the structures and rules of international commerce take their existing forms, how the actions of countries are either enabled or disabled, and what distributional outcomes are achieved. However, within conventional accounts, there has been a tendency to either view power according to a single reading - namely the direct, coercive sense - or to overlook the concept entirely, focusing instead on liberal cooperation and legalization. In this book, Matthew Eagleton-Pierce shows that each of these approaches betray certain limitations which, in turn, have cut short, or worked against, more critical appraisals of power in transnational capitalism. To expand the intellectual space, the book investigates the complex relationship between power and legitimation by drawing upon Pierre Bourdieu's notion of symbolic power. A focus on symbolic power aims to alert scholars to how the construction of certain knowledge claims are fundamental to, and entwined within, the material struggle for international trade. Empirically, the argument uncovers and plots the recent strategies adopted by Southern countries in their pursuit of a more equitable trading order. By bringing together insights from political economy, sociology, and law, Symbolic Power in the WTO not only enlivens and enriches the study of diplomatic practice within a major multilateral institution, it also advances the broader understanding of power in world politics.

For reviews, see: http://ukcatalogue.oup.com/product/9780199662647.do#.UXEY_Cv71C8

 

 

 

Tue 28 May 2013, 12:30

'Conservative globalism at a crossroads: Turkey's economic and democratisation challenges during the AKP era'

Speaker: Ziya Önis (Koç University, Istanbul)

Venue:Seminar Room, European Studies Centre 70 Woodstock

Chair: Kerem Öktem (St Antony’s College, Oxford)

This event is part of the SEESOX Seminar Series seminar series.

Tue 28 May 2013, 14:00

'How to Reshape Treaties without Negotiation: Intellectual Property Enforcement as a Case Study of Global Governance by Stealth'

Speaker: Valéria Guimarães de Lima e Silva (Hauser Fellow, NYU)

Venue:Swire Seminar Room, University College

Dr Valéria Guimarães de Lima e Silva, a Hauser Fellow at NYU and previously an Oxford-Princeton Global Leaders Fellow, will be presenting her paper on How to Reshape Treaties Without Negotiations: Intellectual Property Enforcement as a Case of Global Governance by Stealth. Alison Slade, of the Oxford IP Research Centre, will be discussant.Thomas Hale, of the Blavatnik School of Government, will chair.

Tue 28 May 2013, 17:00

‘Is Universalism Ethnocentric?’

Speaker: Michael Ignatieff (Harvard University) in conversation with Adam Roberts (Oxford University) and Timothy Garton Ash (Oxford University)

Venue:Nissan Lecture Theatre, St. Antony's College

Dahrendorf Programme for the Study of Freedom event.

Mon 27 May 2013 to Tue 28 May 2013

'Comparative Protest Politics Workshop'

Venue:Nuffield College

The key focus of the workshop is to combine and complement recent advances in empirical and theoretical knowledge of protest events in different regions. Participant paper contributions will seek to find links, as well as analyse variations in processes, actor involvement (including types and roles of actors) and structural mechanisms involved in the making of protest events. We are interested in having a deliberate mix in methodology, including comparative cases studies, quantitative analyses and formal models.

We aim to provide a space for comparative, collaborative and multidisciplinary analyses of the phenomenon of protest events, a trend that is not only of interest to academic investigations but also affects large portions of citizens and governments in most regions of the world. The workshop will not only promote the exchange of knowledge between British, European and North American based scholars, but it will also help shape the development of a new research agenda and identify new directions for protest event research.

Full details of this event are here.

Open to all Oxford University members

Please register your participation by e-mailing the organizer olga.onuch@nuffield.ox.ac.uk

 

Contact Olga Onuch

Fri 24 May 2013, 15:00

'No sustainable eurozone without euro-dividend?'

Speaker: Professor Philippe Van Parijs

Venue:Law Board Room, St Cross Building, St. Cross Road

Discussant: Dr. Pavlos Eleftheriadis

This event is part of the Justice and Democracy beyond the Nation-State: Lessons From and For Europe seminar series.

Fri 24 May 2013, 15:00

'Croatian foreign policy: The EU and South East Europe'

Speaker: Ivo Josipovic (President of Croatia)

Venue:Nissan Lecture Theatre, St. Antony's College

Chair: David Madden(St Antony’s College, Oxford) with an introduction by Dr Othon Anastasakis (Director of SEESOX and the European Studies Centre).

Read about President Josipovic at http://predsjednik.hr/PRESIDENT

Please register your attendance with Julie Adams at julie.adams@sant.ox.ac.uk / Tel 01865 274537 

This event is part of the SEESOX Seminar Series seminar series.

Thu 23 May 2013, 19:30

Film Screening: 'Dead Man Walking'

Venue:TS Eliot Theatre, Merton College

On Thursday 23 May all are invited to the film 'Dead Man Walking' in the TS Eliot theatre, Merton College, at 7.30pm preceded by drinks from 7pm. 

The film is inspired by the work of Sr Helen Prejean, a leading American activist for the abolition of the death penalty. She is the founder of Survive, an organisation devoted to counselling the families of victims of violence. She served as National Chairperson of the National Coalition to Abolish the Death Penalty from 1993 to 1995.

Sr Helen will probably not be present at the film showing, but she will speak at Choral Evensong in Mertion College Chapel on Sunday 26 May, at 5.45, and all are welcome.

Jointly sponsored by OxPeace and Mertion Global Directions.

For any further info contact  Amalia Feld at Merton:  Amalia Feld [amalsf@gmail.com]

 

 

Tue 21 May 2013, 14:00

'Gridlock: Why global cooperation is failing when we need it most'

Venue:Lecture Theatre, Blavatnik School of Government, 10 Merton Street, Oxford, OX1 4JJ

Book launch and panel discussion event

Why is global governance stalling when we need it most? A new book argues that the problem is gridlock—a set of trends hampering multilateral cooperation across all areas of global politics. New powers have brought a more diverse range of interests to the negotiating table, while the problems requiring collective action have grown more numerous and complex. At the same time, existing institutions have locked-in outmoded decision-making procedures and created a fragmented governance patchwork that slows action. Ironically, many of these problems stem from the previous successes of international cooperation over the postwar period. Those successes allowed globalization to advance to a point at which the very same institutions now struggle to manage the interdependence they helped create.

The panel will examine multilateral gridlock and its implications around the world. Chaired by world renowned political scientist Robert Keohane, the panel will feature Gridlock author Dr Thomas Hale of the Blavatnik School and four distinguished alumni of the Oxford-Princeton Global Leaders Fellowship programme: Dr Bo Qu of the China Foreign Affairs University, Dr George Gray Molina of UNDP, Dr Leany Lemos of the Brazilian Senate, and Dr Arunabha Ghosh of the Council on Energy, Environment and Water (India).

This event is co-hosted by the Blavatnik School of Government, the Global Economic Governance Programme, and the Centre for International Studies at the University of Oxford.


About the book
Gridlock: Why Global Cooperation Is Failing When We Need It Most
by Thomas Hale, David Held, Kevin Young
(Polity Press)

Mon 20 May 2013, 10:00

Basque Visiting Fellow Workshop: 'Europe of regions: the role of media'

Venue:Seminar Room, European Studies Centre 70 Woodstock

Prof. Peter Humphreys (The University of Manchester)

Gorka Mercero (Eusko Ikaskuntza and University of Birmingham)

Irati Agirreazkuenaga (University of Basque Country)

Mikel Anton ( President’s Office, Basque Government)

Aitziber Díez (Grupo Noticias)

Convenor: Estefania Jimenez (St. Antony’s College, Oxford)

 

Mon 20 May 2013, 12:30

Book Launch: 'State-Nationalisms in the Ottoman Empire, Greece and Turkey: Orthodox and Muslims, 1830-1945'

Speaker: Dimitris Kamouzis and Stefanos Katsikas (Centre for Asia Minor Studies, Athens and University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign)

Venue:Fellows Dining Room, St Antony's College

Modern Greek Seminar

All welcome

Mon 20 May 2013, 17:00

'Greece’s foreign policy priorities'

Speaker: Konstantinos Bikas (Greek Ambassador to Britain)

Venue:Seminar Room, European Studies Centre 70 Woodstock

Mr. Kostantinos Bikas is Ambassador of Greece to the United Kingdom. In 1978 he graduated in Law with honours at the University of Athens, and then post-graduate studies in private shipping law, and international law, at the University of Hamburg in Germany. In 1983 he joined the Greek Diplomatic Service, and from 1988 to 1992 served as Consul in Vancouver, Canada and then as First Secretary, of the Greek Embassy in Algeria. From 1993 to 1998 he was a spokesman for the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. The next four years, until 2002, he served as Head in the Greek Embassy in Iraq and after three years as Consul General in Boston (USA). From 2005 he was Director of the Private Office of H.E. the President of the Hellenic Republic Mr. Karolos Papoulias. In 2009 he became General Director of the Greek National Intelligence Service. In 2012 he became a Minister Plenipotentiary First Class.

Chair: Othon Anastasakis (St Antony’s College, Oxford)

 

This event is part of the SEESOX Seminar Series seminar series.

Mon 20 May 2013, 17:30

'Hobbes's Dilemma and the Liberal Quest for World Order'

Speaker: Robert Keohane (Princeton University)

Venue:Lecture Theatre, Blavatnik School of Government, 10 Merton Street, Oxford, OX1 4JJ

In his talk, Professor Keohane will address the challenges of maintaining a liberal world order, particularly in the face of increasing globalization and changing notions of sovereignty.  

Fri 17 May 2013, 15:00

'An ever closer union among the peoples of Europe: Republican Intergovernmentalism and Demoicratic Representation within the EU'

Speaker: Richard Bellamy (University College London)

Venue:Law Board Room, St Cross Building, St. Cross Road

Discussant: David Miller

This event is part of the Justice and Democracy beyond the Nation-State: Lessons From and For Europe seminar series.

Fri 17 May 2013, 17:00

'Cyprus and the energy developments in the Eastern Mediterranean'

Speaker: Charles Ellinas (Cyprus National Hydrocarbons Company)

Venue:Seminar Room, European Studies Centre 70 Woodstock

Chair: Androulla Kaminara (St Antony’s College, Oxford)

In association with European Studies Centre

This event is part of the SEESOX Seminar Series seminar series.

Wed 15 May 2013, 17:00

'Emerging Europe in the light of the crisis'

Speaker: Peter Sanfey (European Bank of Reconstruction and Development) and Jeromin Zettelmeyer (European Bank for Reconstruction and Development)

Venue:Seminar Room, European Studies Centre 70 Woodstock

Chair: Max Watson (St Antony’s College, Oxford)

In association with PEFM

This event is part of the SEESOX Seminar Series seminar series.

Tue 14 May 2013, 17:00

'Embedding Integration: European Union History in a Trans- and International Perspective'

Speaker: Professor Kiran Klaus Patel (Maastricht University)

Venue:Lecture Theatre, Faculty of History

2013 MEHRC Special Lecture

All Welcome

Enquiries jane.cunning@history.ox.ac.uk

 

Mon 13 May 2013, 16:00

'The Mortality and Morality of Nations: Israelis, Afrikaners, Quebecois'

Speaker: Dr. Uriel Abulof (University of Tel Aviv)

Venue:School of Interdisciplinary Area Studies

Convenor: Derek Penslar, School of Interdisciplinary Area Studies and Department of Politics and International Relations.

This event is part of the Israel Studies seminar series.

Sat 11 May 2013, 09:00

2013 OxPeace Conference “The Future of Peacebuilding”

Venue:St John’s College, Oxford

Preceded on Friday 10 May by a Conference Dinner with address by Ingrid Betancourt, former senator and anti-corruption activist in Colombia, kidnapped and held by FARC 2002-2008.

Keynote speakers on Sat 11 May: Carolyn McAskie OC, University of Ottawa, former UN Assistant Secretary General for Peacebuilding and head of the UN Peacebuilding Commission, Paul Rogers, Professor of Peace Studies, University of Bradford, and Dr Cyril Obi, Program Director of the African Peacebuilding Network at the New York-based SSRC.

Breakout sessions on: Environmental peacebuilding in the Middle East with Yossi Leshem (ornithologist, Israel), Azzam Alwash (the Marshes, Iraq), and Chris Naylor (A Rocha, Lebanon);  Roles of Universities and Peacebuilding with Massimo Caneva (University of Rome, connecting universities in the Balkans and Middle East), Koji Nakamura (Konan University, Kobe, Japan, peace education for exchange students), Yoav Bornstein and Elizabeth Jadon (Olive Tree Israel-Palestine Scholarship programme at City University, London);  Tensions in counter-terrorism and peacebuilding with Anja Shortland (land-based solutions to Somali piracy), Alexander Leveringhaus (drones) and Annette Idler (drugs, conflict and peace in Colombia); UN Peacekeeping and Peacebuilding with Cyril Obi (Africa Peacebuilding Network), Sacha Meuter (UN peacekeeping radio), and Sarah von Billerbeck (local ownership of UN peacebuilding in the DRC).

 

Open Film Evening: Saturday 11 May at 8pm in the Auditorium, St John's College:

Screening of two films on environmental peacebuilding in the Middle East. "Wings of Peace" describing the work of distinguished Israeli ornithologist Prof. Yossi Leshem and the 'Migrating Birds know no Boundaries' project. And "Miracle in the Iraqi Marshes" describing the work of Goldman Prize-winning conservationist Dr Azzam Alwash in restoring from desert the internationally important Iraqi marshlands. In the presence of Yossi Leshem and Azzam Alwash. All are welcome.


This Conference is open to all, and is free for students (who are however invited to make a voluntary contribution of £5 on the day to help cover the sandwich lunch and coffee/tea). Non-students are asked to contribute £10 on the day. Senior concession as for students.

Registration forms will be sent early in the New Year to all OxPeace email list members, and will be obtainable from the Conference Assistant, Jason.robinson@sant.ox.ac.uk to whom all enquiries should be addressed.

The 2013 OxPeace Conference is sponsored by the African Studies Centre, the Centre for International Studies, the St John's College Research Centre, and the Oxford Peace Research Trust.

Contact Conference Assistant

Fri 10 May 2013, 15:00

'The use of foreign law in national constitutional law : a challenge to democracy and sovereignty?'

Speaker: Professor Jeremy Waldron

Venue:Law Board Room, St Cross Building, St. Cross Road

Discussant: Dr. Pavlos Eleftheriadis

This event is part of the Justice and Democracy beyond the Nation-State: Lessons From and For Europe seminar series.

Thu 09 May 2013, 09:15

'Agency in the time of Structural Adjustment: Social perspectives on contemporary Greece'

Venue:Seminar Room, European Studies Centre 70 Woodstock

Speakers: Georgios Agelopoulos (University of Macedonia, Thessaloniki), Dimitris Dalakoglou (University of Sussex), Dimitrios Gkintidis (St Antony’s College, Oxford), Renee Hirschon (St Peter’s College, Oxford), Daniel Martyn Knight (LSE), Dimitris Papanikolaou (St Cross College, Oxford).

Convenor: Dimitrios Gkintidis (St Antony’s College, Oxford)

Attendance is free, but please let us know in advance if you would like to attend at the following address: dimitrios.gkintidis@sant.ox.ac.uk


For further information please visit the workshop website:
http://www.sant.ox.ac.uk/seesox/agencyingreece.html

 

Mon 06 May 2013, 17:00

'Serbia and regional cooperation in the Western Balkans: EU membership perspective as a tool for overcoming the past'

Speaker: Dejan Popovic (Ambassador of Serbia to the United Kingdom)

Venue:Seminar Room, European Studies Centre 70 Woodstock

Discussant: Elizabeth Roberts (Trinity College, Oxford)

Chair: David Madden (St Antony’s College, Oxford)

This event is part of the SEESOX Seminar Series seminar series.

Fri 03 May 2013 to Sun 05 May 2013

'Combining Freedom and Diversity: Lessons from Experience in Britain, Canada, France, Germany and the United States'

Venue:Dahrendorf Room, Founder’s Building at St Antony’s

Registration is essential. Please register here: http://www.sant.ox.ac.uk/esc/fanddregistration.html

One of the major challenges of our time is how to combine freedom and diversity. This research project looks at lessons from experience in five advanced Western democracies: Britain, France, Germany, the US and Canada. We have set out to gather already published indicators and relevant analyses, as well as pursuing individual avenues of original research. This year's Dahrendorf Colloquium is a major conference on 3-5 May 2013, bringing together experts from many different fields and all five countries, with Martha Nussbaum delivering a keynote lecture. The focus is firmly on conclusions useful for public policy.

At the end of the process, a report will be prepared, presenting key findings from the comparative research, and drawing lessons, both positive and negative.

The project is based at the European Studies Centre at St Antony’s College Oxford, in the context of the Dahrendorf Programme for the Study of Freedom. The project chair is Professor Timothy Garton Ash and the principal investigator is Dr Kerem Öktem.

Fri 03 May 2013, 15:00

'Understanding the EU and its Crisis through the Lens of Demoicracy'

Speaker: Professor Kalypso Nicolaidis

Venue:Law Board Room, St Cross Building, St. Cross Road

Discussant: Professor Philippe Van Parijs

This event is part of the Justice and Democracy beyond the Nation-State: Lessons From and For Europe seminar series.

Tue 30 April 2013, 14:15

'The Future of Constructivist Research in International Relations'

Speaker: Kathryn Sikkink (University of Minnesota), Iver Neumann (LSE), Martha Finnemore (George Washington University) and Amitav Acharya (American University)

Venue:Lecture Theatre, Manor Road Building

This half-day workshop will discuss the contributions of constructivism and what the future constructivist research agenda might look like. The workshop will consist of four sessions: each will begin with a lead-off presentation of around 15/20 minutes followed by a discussant. Convenor: Professor Andrew Hurrell. 

Session One: 14.15 to 15.00. Professor Kathryn Sikkink,  (McKnight Presidential Chair in Political Science, University of Minnesota and Visiting Professor, Blavatnik School of Government), ‘The Role of Agency in Constructivism’.  Discussant:  Mr Max Thompson (Oxford DPIR). Chair: Professor Duncan Snidal (Oxford DPIR).

Session Two: 15.00 to 15.45. Professor Iver Neumann (Montague Burton Professor of International Relations, LSE), ‘Constructivism and the Turn to Practice’. Discussant: Mr Quentin Bruneau (Oxford DPIR). Chair:  Professor Todd Hall (University of Toronto). Followed by a tea/coffee break.

Session Three: 16.00 to 16.45. Professor Martha Finnemore (University Professor of Political Science and International Affairs, The George Washington University), ‘Are legal norms distinctive and what do they add to the analysis of political change?’  Discussant: Dr Travers McLeod (Oxford DPIR). Chair:  Professor Andrew Hurrell (Oxford DPIR).

Session Four: 16.45 to 17.30. Professor Amitav Acharya (UNESCO Chair in Transnational Challenges and Governance, American University), ‘Constructivism and the Study of Global IR’.  Discussant:  Mr Vinicius Rodrigues Vieira (Oxford DPIR). Chair: Professor Kalypso Nicolaidis (Oxford DPIR).

17.30 to 18.00: General discussion and wrap-up.

The workshop will be followed by a reception in the Common Room, Manor Road Building.

To register for this event (no registration fee) please visit the event registration page on the Department of Politics and International Relations website (http://www.politics.ox.ac.uk/index.php/event-registration.html).

For any queries contact: matthew.kennedy@politics.ox.ac.uk

Contact Matthew Kennedy

Mon 29 April 2013, 12:30

'Symbology of the state and its discontents: The case of Turkey'

Speaker: Nora Fisher Onar (Bahçesehir University, Istanbul)

Venue:Seminar Room, European Studies Centre 70 Woodstock

Chair: Othon Anastasakis (St Antony’s College, Oxford)

This event is part of the SEESOX Seminar Series seminar series.

Fri 26 April 2013, 15:00

'Social Justice in the European Union: four views'

Speaker: Professor Philippe Van Parijs

Venue:Law Board Room, St Cross Building, St. Cross Road

Discussant: Professor David Miller

Thu 25 April 2013, 12:30

'The evolution of the Syria conflict, and Turkish-Syrian relations'

Speaker: Yasar Yakis (Former Turkish Foreign Minister, and a former Turkish Ambassador to the UN Office in Austria, Egypt, and Saudi Arabia)

Venue:Seminar Room, European Studies Centre 70 Woodstock

Discussant: Roy Allison (St Antony’s College, Oxford)

Chair: Edward Mortimer (All Souls College, Oxford)

This event is part of the SEESOX Seminar Series seminar series.

Tue 23 April 2013, 17:00

'Turkey and the European Union energy policy'

Speaker: Hasan Murat Mercan (Turkish Deputy Minister for Energy)

Venue:Seminar Room, European Studies Centre 70 Woodstock

Discussant: Androulla Kaminara (St Antony’s College, Oxford)

Chair: Othon Anastasakis (St Antony’s College, Oxford)

In association with European Studies Centre

This event is part of the SEESOX Seminar Series seminar series.

Mon 22 April 2013, 17:00

'The global and Euro area crises: Will next time be different?'

Speaker: Sean Berrigan (Director for Financial Stability and Monetary Affairs in DG ECFIN at the European Commission)

Venue:Seminar Room, European Studies Centre 70 Woodstock

Political Economy of Financial Markets (PEFM) Seminar

Chair: Max Watson (St Antony’s College, Oxford)

Wed 06 March 2013, 17:15

To be confirmed

Speaker: To be confirmed

Venue:The Wharton Room, All Souls College, Oxford

This event is part of the Campaigning and Generalship Seminars seminar series.

Tue 05 March 2013, 13:00

'Exit Strategies and State Building'

Speaker: Professor Richard Caplan (Oxford, DPIR)

Venue:Manor Road Building, Seminar Room G

A light sandwich lunch is served at 12.45pm. All are welcome.

This event is part of the Lunchtime Discussions with Changing Character of War seminar series.

Mon 04 March 2013, 17:00

'Domestic politics – democratic regression?'

Speaker: Iveta Radicova (Former Prime Minister of Slovakia)

Venue:ESC Seminar Room

South East Europe: Revisiting Convergence

Iveta Radicova (Former Prime Minister of Slovakia)

Political structures in the countries of the region are confronting previously unheard of pressures and influences. The role of the state is being increasingly put into question. Party politics are fluid and challenged by the electorates. The crisis is affecting domestic politics not just in relatively fragile and new democracies but in the most advanced and consolidated democracies of the region, as well. Do we in fact risk seeing a form of active “democratic regression” away from the pluralist polity envisaged in the EU? Or is the EU itself, by its own interventionist and “power politics” approach creating new democratic deficits and external dependencies? Are we seeing the countries of the region establishing a degree of political stability based on a model other than that seen in classical western democracies?

This event is part of the SEESOX Seminar Series seminar series.

Mon 04 March 2013, 17:00

'Domestic politics – democratic regression?'

Speaker: Othon Anastasakis (St Antony's College, Oxford), Kerem Öktem (St Antony's College, Oxford) and Iveta Radicova (St Antony's College, Oxford)

Venue:ESC Seminar Room

South East Europe: Revisiting Convergence

Othon Anastasakis is Director of the European Studies Centre and SEESOX

Kerem Öktem is a Research Fellow with the European Studies Centre

Iveta Radicová is a Visiting Fellow with the Media and Democracy in Central Europe project at the European Studies Centre, and Former Prime Minister of Slovakia

Chair: Jonathan Scheele (St Antony's College, Oxford)

Political structures in the countries of the region are confronting previously unheard of pressures and influences. The role of the state is being increasingly put into question. Party politics are fluid and challenged by the electorates. The crisis is affecting domestic politics not just in relatively fragile and new democracies but in the most advanced and consolidated democracies of the region, as well. Do we in fact risk seeing a form of active “democratic regression” away from the pluralist polity envisaged in the EU? Or is the EU itself, by its own interventionist and “power politics” approach creating new democratic deficits and external dependencies? Are we seeing the countries of the region establishing a degree of political stability based on a model other than that seen in classical western democracies?

This event is part of the SEESOX Seminar Series seminar series.

Thu 28 February 2013, 12:30

'The implications of the February 2013 Presidential elections in Cyprus'

Speaker: Androulla Kaminara (EU Visiting Fellow, St Antony’s College, Oxford)

Venue:Seminar Room, European Studies Centre 70 Woodstock

Chaired by David Madden (St Antony’s College, Oxford)

Convenor: Othon Anastasakis

Androulla Kaminara is the EU Visiting Fellow for 2012/13. Between 2008-12 Ms Kaminara was the Head of the European Commission’s Representation in Cyprus. Previously she was the Director for Quality of Development Cooperation Operations in all third countries, Head of Unit for geographic coordination for 44 African and Caribbean countries, as well as member of cabinet of two Commissioners. She has been working for the European Commission since 1991.

(Lunch provided)

 

Wed 27 February 2013, 17:15

'Security and the Olympics'

Speaker: Brigadier James Cowan (Commander 3rd Div)

Venue:The Wharton Room, All Souls College, Oxford

This event is part of the Campaigning and Generalship Seminars seminar series.

Tue 26 February 2013, 13:00

'Political-Military Strategy-Making in Regional Command South Afghanistan'

Speaker: Todd Greentree (CCW Visiting Research Associate)

Venue:Manor Road Building, Seminar Room G

A light sandwich lunch is served at 12.45pm. All are welcome.

This event is part of the Lunchtime Discussions with Changing Character of War seminar series.

Mon 25 February 2013, 17:00

'CANCELLED - EU’s enlargement and foreign policy and the rise of external actors'

Speaker: Maria-Eleni Koppa, MEP (European Parliament)

Venue:ESC Seminar Room

CANCELLATION NOTICE

This event has been cancelled as the speaker, Maria-Eleni Koppa, is no longer able to attend.

-------------------

South East Europe: Revisiting Convergence

Maria-Eleni Koppa, MEP (European Parliament)

Discussant: Alex Rondos (European External Action Service) tbc

Chair: Jan Zielonka (St Antony’s College, Oxford)

What is the EU’s enlargement agenda? What is the role of the European Commission and the European Parliament? What roles do the non-regional actors - Russia, USA, China - now play? Do they, or others, constitute realistic alternatives to the “EU as empire”, however voluntaristic that may be for the countries involved? Are there implications of this situation for other nearby regions - Caucasus, Syria and the Arab Spring, - whether in terms of their own internal evolution or of the future role of different external actors, including the EU, in these regions? What will be the future role in the region of an economically successful and politically confident Turkey: can it even be seen in terms of a “rival hegemon”?

This event is part of the SEESOX Seminar Series seminar series.

Fri 22 February 2013, 14:00

'Building Integrity in Government'

Speaker: Alina Mungiu-Pippidi and Nilima Gulrajani

Venue:Lecture Theatre, Blavatnik School of Government, 10 Merton Street, Oxford, OX1 4JJ

Global Economic Governance Seminar Series

2-3:30pm, Fridays, Hilary Term 2013

Lecture Theatre, Blavatnik School of Government, 10 Merton Street.

Alina Mungiu-Pippidi, Professor of Democracy Studies, Hertie School of Governance

Nilima Gulrajani, Senior Researcher, Global Economic Governance Programme, Oxford

Despite efforts to fight corruption, bribery, and inefficient institutions, a lack of integrity remains a problem throughout the world. How do you measure integrity in governments? What are the policies by which you build it?

This event is part of the Global Economic Governance Speaker Series seminar series.

Thu 21 February 2013, 17:00

'Israel’s relations with Turkey and her new “friendships” in South East Europe'

Speaker: Alon Liel (Former Israeli Ambassador)

Venue:Seminar Room, European Studies Centre 70 Woodstock

Convenors: Othon Anastasakis and Celia Kerslake

Wed 20 February 2013, 17:15

'Britain’s Withdrawal from Afghanistan, 1880-81'

Speaker: Professor Ian Beckett

Venue:The Wharton Room, All Souls College, Oxford

This event is part of the Military History Seminars seminar series.

Tue 19 February 2013, 13:00

'Legitimate Targets? The Partial Effectiveness of International Law in US Air Warfare'

Speaker: Dr Janina Dill (Oxford, DPIR)

Venue:Manor Road Building, Seminar Room G

A light sandwich lunch is served at 12.45pm. All are welcome.

This event is part of the Lunchtime Discussions with Changing Character of War seminar series.

Mon 18 February 2013, 17:00

'Power sharing – can the EU impose sustainable arrangements?'

Speaker: James Ker-Lindsay (LSE) and Cvete Koneska (St Antony’s College, Oxford)

Venue:ESC Seminar Room

South East Europe: Revisiting Convergence

James Ker-Lindsay (LSE) and Cvete Koneska (St Antony’s College, Oxford)

Discussant:  Richard Caplan (DPIR, University of Oxford)

Chair: David Madden (St Antony’s College, Oxford)

The EU has, for reasons of clear self-interest, been the most active external actor in the region over the past decade, often in cooperation with NATO. It has in particular increasingly been the main arbiter of the “correct” implementation of post-conflict and/or conflict-prevention arrangements (Macedonia, Bosnia, Kosovo, ...). How far has the EU been successful in ensuring that these arrangements can ultimately become self-sustaining, without the need for permanent, pro-active, external intervention?

This event is part of the SEESOX Seminar Series seminar series.

Fri 15 February 2013, 14:00

'Delivering Development: can business succeed where traditional donors fail?'

Speaker: Henry Gonzalez, Rita Perakis and Alexander Woollcombe

Venue:Lecture Theatre, Blavatnik School of Government, 10 Merton Street, Oxford, OX1 4JJ

Global Economic Governance Seminar Series

2-3:30pm, Fridays, Hilary Term 2013

Lecture Theatre, Blavatnik School of Government, 10 Merton Street.

Henry Gonzalez, Head of Research, responsAbility Investments; Entrepreneur-in-Residence, Skoll Centre, Said Business School, Oxford

Rita Perakis, Program Associate, Centre for Global Development

Alexander Woollcombe, Gates Foundation Programme Officer in charge of UK and EU Government Relations

Private actors, including social entrepreneurs, venture philanthropy, and corporate social responsibility initiatives are increasingly influential in development. Who are these private actors, and will their methods deliver better development outcomes? Will traditional donors effectively integrate these new private actors into their work?

This event is part of the Global Economic Governance Speaker Series seminar series.

Wed 13 February 2013, 17:15

'German foreign missions and the legacy of history, 1990-2010'

Speaker: Dr. Michael Epkenhans (Director of Research)

Venue:The Wharton Room, All Souls College, Oxford

This event is part of the Campaigning and Generalship Seminars seminar series.

Tue 12 February 2013, 13:00

'The Protection of Educational Institutions During Armed Conflict'

Speaker: Professor Steven Haines (Greenwich and CCW Visiting Fellow)

Venue:Manor Road Building, Seminar Room G

A light sandwich lunch is served at 12.45pm. All are welcome.

This event is part of the Lunchtime Discussions with Changing Character of War seminar series.

Mon 11 February 2013, 15:00

'People and the Planet: are we moving toward sustainability or catastrophe?'

Speaker: Sir John Sulston

Venue:Lecture Theatre, Blavatnik School of Government, 10 Merton Street, Oxford, OX1 4JJ

Sir John Sulston, Winner of the Nobel Prize in Medicine; Chair of the Institute for Science, Ethics, and Innovation (iSEI), University of Manchester.

Extreme poverty, unsustainable consumption, and global population growth are three pressing challenges facing the world in the 21st century. Sir John will discuss the recommendations of a Royal Society Working Group he chaired, which took up these challenges.

This event is part of the Global Economic Governance Speaker Series seminar series.

Mon 11 February 2013, 17:00

'Reform – how far does the EU have real transformative power?'

Speaker: Heather Grabbe (Open Society European Policy Institute) and Sorin Moisa (St Antony’s College, Oxford)

Venue:ESC Seminar Room

South East Europe: Revisiting Convergence

Heather Grabbe (Open Society European Policy Institute)

Sorin Moisa (St Antony’s College, Oxford)

Chair: Jonathan Scheele (St Antony’s College, Oxford)

The perspective of accession to the European Union has been perceived as the glue preventing the Western Balkan states from reverting to the inter-ethnic and inter-state rivalries seen during the 1990s. How far is the EU still committed to enlargement to the South East – and at what speed? How serious is it – in the face of the multiple crises it is dealing with, both internally and in the wider European neighbourhood - about keeping the South East Europe periphery on board? Are the EU’s terms of engagement well-adapted to these countries, or are they too “top-down” in terms of societies where there is a considerable disconnect between political elites and the interests and sympathies of the population at large? Even given political will on the EU side, the likely timescale is very long term; how credible does the concept of convergence through preparation for EU accession then remain?

This event is part of the SEESOX Seminar Series seminar series.

Fri 08 February 2013, 14:00

'Tackling Climate Change: is it time to give up on a multilateral solution?'

Speaker: Dieter Helm, Cameron Hepburn and Robert Falkner

Venue:Lecture Theatre, Blavatnik School of Government, 10 Merton Street, Oxford, OX1 4JJ

Global Economic Governance Seminar Series

2-3:30pm, Fridays, Hilary Term 2013

Lecture Theatre, Blavatnik School of Government, 10 Merton Street.

Dieter Helm, Professor in Energy Policy, and faculty member of Blavatnik School of Government, Oxford

Cameron Hepburn, Senior Research Fellow, Grantham Institute, the London School of Economics

Robert Falkner, Reader in International Relations, the London School of Economics

This year, diplomats, NGOs, companies, and others will again try to negotiate a binding global deal on carbon emissions. Progress in multilateral negotiations has been painfully slow. Why? What other tools exist? What are the consequences of abandoning multilateral negotiations?

 

This event is part of the Global Economic Governance Speaker Series seminar series.

Wed 06 February 2013, 17:15

'British Military Intelligence in the 19th Century'

Speaker: William Beaver

Venue:The Wharton Room, All Souls College, Oxford

This event is part of the Military History Seminars seminar series.

Tue 05 February 2013, 13:00

'Social Media at War in the 21st Century'

Speaker: John McCubbin (i-Logue)

Venue:Manor Road Building, Seminar Room G

A light sandwich lunch is served at 12.45pm. All are welcome.

This event is part of the Lunchtime Discussions with Changing Character of War seminar series.

Mon 04 February 2013, 17:00

'Society – how far is the impact of the crisis irreversible?'

Speaker: Dimitri A. Sotiropoulos (University of Athens)

Venue:ESC Seminar Room

South East Europe: Revisiting Convergence

Dimitri A. Sotiropoulos (University of Athens)

Discussant: Dimitrios Gkintidis (St Antony’s College, Oxford)

Chair: Max Watson (St Antony’s College, Oxford)

The social impacts of the crisis are undeniable, even in countries where the level of protest has not reached that of Greece. Everywhere in the region we are seeing rising numbers of unemployed, and people disaffected with the choices of their elites and the austerity measures imposed from abroad. We see new forms of protest politics and populist leaders benefiting from such grievances. How in practice should we deal with the medium and long term social impact of the crisis? How far do the social consequences of the crisis, and the consequent tendency to encourage protest politics, undermine the likelihood of a return to the pre-crisis approach? To what extent does the emergence of alternative models of social provision (e.g. Golden Dawn in Greece) impact on this?

This event is part of the SEESOX Seminar Series seminar series.

Fri 01 February 2013, 14:00

'When Aid Goes Wrong: British Foreign Aid and the Pergau Dam Affair'

Speaker: Sir Tim Lankester, Sir Ivor Crewe and Professor John Toye

Venue:Lecture Theatre, Blavatnik School of Government, 10 Merton Street, Oxford, OX1 4JJ

SPEAKERS:

Sir Tim Lankester (former President, Corpus Christi College, Oxford; former Permanent Secretary of the Department for International Development (DFID))

Sir Ivor Crewe (Master of University College, Oxford)

Professor John Toye (Chair of the Advisory Panel of the Department of International Development, Oxford)

The Pergau dam in Malaysia was the most controversial project in the history of British aid. Because of its high cost, it was a poor candidate for aid funding. It was provided in part to honour a highly irregular promise of civil aid in connection with a major arms deal. After two parliamentary inquiries and intense media coverage, in a landmark judgement the aid for Pergau was declared unlawful. As The Economist said in its review of the book, “Sir Tim had a ringside seat in all this, and provides a lucid analysis of how the disaster unfolded.” The Guardian called it “a revealing book about the scandal that redefined aid.” 

Sir Tim Lankester will present insights from his recent book 'The Politics and Economics of Britain’s Foreign Aid: The Pergau Dam Affair'. He will ask whether, given what was known at the time and what we know now, he and his colleagues in Britain’s aid ministry were correct in their objections to the project. Sir Ivor Crewe and Professor John Toye join him as discussants. 

This event is part of the Global Economic Governance Speaker Series seminar series.

Wed 30 January 2013, 17:15

'The Idea of a ‘Fleet in Being’ and Navies in the American War, 1775-1783'

Speaker: Professor John Hattendorf

Venue:The Wharton Room, All Souls College, Oxford

This event is part of the Military History Seminars seminar series.

Tue 29 January 2013, 13:00

'Scenarios for the Iranian Nuclear Crisis in 2013: Diplomatic and Military Options'

Speaker: Dr Bruno Tertrais (Fondation pour la Recherche Stratégique, Paris)

Venue:Manor Road Building, Seminar Room G

A light sandwich lunch is served at 12.45pm. All are welcome.

This event is part of the Lunchtime Discussions with Changing Character of War seminar series.

Mon 28 January 2013, 17:00

'Europeanization of the Balkans or Balkanization of the EU? Governance challenges on both sides'

Speaker: Alina Mungiu-Pippidi (Hertie University, Berlin)

Venue:ESC Seminar Room

SOUTH EAST EUROPE: REVISITING CONVERGENCE

Chaired by Renee Hirschon (St Peter’s College, Oxford)

This event is part of the SEESOX Seminar Series seminar series.

Wed 23 January 2013, 17:15

'‘Caught with Our Pants Down’: The South African Army and the Fall of Tobruk, 1942'

Speaker: Ben Shephard

Venue:The Wharton Room, All Souls College, Oxford

This event is part of the Military History Seminars seminar series.

Tue 22 January 2013, 13:00

'‘Careful What you Wish For’: Peace, Military Literacy, and the Future of the Use of Force in G-8 Countries'

Speaker: Professor Ivan Arreguin-Toft (Boston and Oxford BSG)

Venue:Manor Road Building, Seminar Room G

A light sandwich lunch is served at 12.45pm. All are welcome.

This event is part of the Lunchtime Discussions with Changing Character of War seminar series.

Wed 28 November 2012, 17:00

'21st-Century British Efforts in Iraq and Afghanistan: Is It Too Early to Agree on the Real Lessons and Their Implications?'

Speaker: Paul Schulte (Former Director, UK Post-Conflict Reconstruction Unit, PCRU)

Venue:Manor Road Building, Seminar Room A

All seminars will be held in Seminar Room A from 5-6:30pm.

Convenor: Professor Richard Caplan

This event is part of the Post-Conflict State Building: Practitioners' Perspectives seminar series.

Mon 26 November 2012, 14:00

Oxford AIDS Day

Venue:Swire Seminar Room, University College

This event is co-hosted with the Centre for AIDS Interdisciplinary Research at Oxford (CAIRO).

 

 

 

 

This event is part of the Global Economic Governance Michaelmas Term Seminar Series seminar series.

Fri 23 November 2012, 14:00

'Fixing the Funding Machine: why half of the new global financial regulation is misconceived''

Venue:Swire Seminar Room, University College

Speakers:

Macer Gifford, Visiting Fellow, Globalization and Finance Project, Blavatnik School of Government, on sabbatical from Standard Chartered Bank, will present a paper.  Discussants:

Lord Robert May, Professor of Zoology, Oxford

Alan Morrison, Professor of Finance at Said Business School, Oxford

 

 

 

 

This event is part of the Global Economic Governance Michaelmas Term Seminar Series seminar series.

Wed 21 November 2012, 17:00

'Political Economy of Statebuilding: Power after Peace'

Speaker: Professor Mats Berdal (King's College London), Dr Dominik Zaum (University of Reading) and Mr Will Evans (Department for International Development - DFID)

Venue:Manor Road Building, Seminar Room A

Political Economy of Statebuilding: Power after Peace

Professor Mats Berdal, King's College London
Dr Dominik Zaum, University of Reading
Mr Will Evans, Department for International Development (DFID)

Chair: Professor Richard Caplan, DPIR

A panel discussion to mark the publication of Political Economy of Statebuilding: Power after Peace (Routledge)

This event is part of the Post-Conflict State Building: Practitioners' Perspectives seminar series.

Wed 21 November 2012, 17:00

'War and Peace in the 21st Century'

Speaker: Dr James Martin (Hon. Fellow of Keble College)

Venue:Garden Quad Auditorium, St John’s College

An illustrated lecture on ‘getting to zero’, followed by discussion and a drinks reception.  Joint open event, OxPeace with the Human Sciences Global Policy Seminar. Register at ihs.eventbrite.co.uk or just come. Further details on the CIS website (see above).

About the speaker:

Dr Martin founded the Oxford Martin School in 2005 to foster and facilitate innovative, interdisciplinary research on the problems, dangers and opportunities of the near future. A prolific writer and speaker, his forthcoming book is on ‘War and Peace in the Nuclear Age.’

The Oxford Network of Peace Studies (OxPeace) is a multi-disciplinary initiative to promote the academic study of peace, peacemaking, peacebuilding and peacekeeping at the University of Oxford.

This event is part of the Human Sciences Global Policy Seminar Series seminar series.

Fri 16 November 2012, 14:00

'The Geopolitics Of Transboundary Water Governance'

Venue:Swire Seminar Room, University College

The politics of water is a highly-charged issue of geostrategic significance. Asymmetrical relations, along with the overarching problems of water allocation and ecosystem management, have meant that the governance of transboundary water resources is contentious. Extensive infrastructure development, including hydropower and irrigation, coupled with the effects of climate variability and increased resource competition, has not only given rise to a host of concerns regarding the future of major international rivers like the Mekong, Ganges-Brahmaputra, Indus, and Nile (together involving 24 countries), but has also contributed to aggravating regional insecurities. Water disputes and climate risks are not unique to this region, however. There is potential to learn from the development experience and institutional innovations in the Colorado and Murray Darling basins – two contested river basins with a history of intense competition, conflict and cooperation over scarce and variable freshwater. This panel will bring together specialists to examine the geopolitics of water and discuss ways in which shared water resources can be governed in the collective interest.

A panel discussion with:

Dustin Garrick, James Martin Fellow, Oxford Martin Programme on Resource Stewardship

David Grey, Visiting Professor of Water Policy, Oxford, formerly Senior Water Advisor, World Bank

Pichamon May Yeophantong, Oxford-Princeton Global Leaders Fellow, GEG

 

 

 

This event is part of the Global Economic Governance Michaelmas Term Seminar Series seminar series.

Wed 14 November 2012, 17:00

'From state building to member state building: the EU's contribution to stability in the Western Balkans'

Speaker: Stefan Lehne (former Director for the Balkans, Eastern Europe, and Central Asia at the General Secretariat of the Council of the European Union)

Venue:Manor Road Building, Seminar Room A

PLEASE NOTE THE CHANGE OF SPEAKER

All seminars will be held in Seminar Room A from 5-6:30pm.

Convenor: Professor Richard Caplan

This event is part of the Post-Conflict State Building: Practitioners' Perspectives seminar series.

Fri 09 November 2012, 14:00

'Civil Conflict in the Current Era: New Patterns or Same Old?'

Venue:Swire Seminar Room, University College

Has there been, as many have argued, a precipitous decline in civil conflicts during the past decade? What are the underlying drivers of civil conflicts in the current era, and how do they differ from previous eras? Drawing from this analysis, what international and national policy responses are likely to be most, and least, effective in settling such conflicts? 

A panel of experts on civil conflict will address these questions, led by Professor Monica Toft. Before joining the Blavatnik School, Toft was a professor at Harvard and a voice interceptor with the US Army.   Professor Richard Caplan and Dr Anke Hoeffler round out this interdisciplinary panel.  

 

 

 

This event is part of the Global Economic Governance Michaelmas Term Seminar Series seminar series.

Fri 02 November 2012, 14:00

'The Quest for Energy: competition and cooperation between China and India'

Venue:Swire Seminar Room, University College

Speakers:

Sir Chris Llwellyn-Smith, Director of Energy Research, and Visiting Professor of Physics, Oxford

John V. Mitchell, Associate Fellow, Energy, Environment, and Resources, Chatham House

Fuzuo Wu, Oxford-Princeton Global Leaders Fellow

 

This event is part of the Global Economic Governance Michaelmas Term Seminar Series seminar series.

Wed 31 October 2012, 17:00

'The Role of the Media in Post-Conflict Peacebuilding: What Works? How Do We Know?'

Speaker: Mr Anthony Borden (Executive Director, Institute for War and Peace Reporting)

Venue:Manor Road Building, Seminar Room A

All seminars will be held in Seminar Room A from 5-6:30pm.

Convenor: Professor Richard Caplan

This event is part of the Post-Conflict State Building: Practitioners' Perspectives seminar series.

Fri 26 October 2012, 14:00

'Reducing Corruption: a prerequisite for development?'

Venue:Swire Seminar Room, University College

Speakers

David Anderson, Professor of African Politics, Oxford

Liz David-Barrett, Research Fellow at the Centre for Corporate Regulation, Said Business School, Oxford

Alexander Kupatadze, Oxford-Princeton Global Leaders Fellow

Mark Philp, University Lecturer in Politics, Oxford

This event is part of the Global Economic Governance Michaelmas Term Seminar Series seminar series.

Wed 24 October 2012, 17:00

‘The Bride and the Dowry: Israel, Jordan, and the Palestinians in the Aftermath of the June 1967 War’

Speaker: Dr Avi Raz

Venue:Manor Road Building, Seminar Room C

Lecture and Book Launch Event

Dr Avi Raz will be discussing his new book, The Bride and the Dowry: Israel, Jordan, and the Palestinians in the Aftermath of the June 1967 War, at 5pm on Wednesday 24 October in Seminar Room C, Manor Road Building.

Dr Raz will speak on 'Perish the Thought: Israel and the Search for Peace in the late 1960s'.

Participant: Professor Avi Shlaim

Chair: Professor Andrew Hurrell

Wed 17 October 2012, 17:00

'Political Settlements and Sustainable Peace: Lessons from the Recent Past'

Speaker: Mr Francesc Vendrell (former UN special envoy for Afghanistan, East Timor, Cambodia, Papua New Guinea, Myanmar, Armenia, Azerbaijan, and Central America)

Venue:Manor Road Building, Seminar Room A

Convenor: Professor Richard Caplan

All welcome

This event is part of the Post-Conflict State Building: Practitioners' Perspectives seminar series.

Fri 12 October 2012, 14:30

'Liquid Authority: Institutions, Law and Legitimacy in Global Governance'

Speaker: Professor Nico Krisch (Professor of International Law, Hertie School of Governance, Berlin, and ICREA Research Professor, IBEI, Barcelona)

Venue:Lecture Theatre, Manor Road Building

2012 DASTURZADA DR JAL PAVRY MEMORIAL LECTURE IN INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS

Professor Nico Krisch, Professor of International Law, Hertie School of Governance, Berlin, and ICREA Research Professor, IBEI, Barcelona, will deliver the 2012 Lecture at 2.30pm on Friday 12 October in the Lecture Theatre, Manor Road Building.

Subject: ‘Liquid Authority: Institutions, Law and Legitimacy in Global Governance’   

This will be followed by a DISCUSSION FORUM, also in the Lecture Theatre, Manor Road Building from 15.45 to 17.45, followed by a reception.  All welcome.

Subject:  ‘New Directions in the Study of Global Governance’

Participants:      

Professor Duncan Snidal, Department of Politics and International Relations

Dr Alex Betts, Queen Elizabeth House

Professor Nico Krisch, Hertie School of Governance, Berlin

Chair:                 

Professor Andrew Hurrell, Department of Politics and International Relations  

Thu 20 September 2012 to Fri 21 September 2012, 10:00

'Soldiers within Society'

Speaker: various

Venue:University of Reading

How do soldiers perceive their status within society?  How do society and the government perceive the soldier as a citizen of society?  Soldiers’ tasks have undergone a huge transformation since the end of the Cold War.  Ground forces have had to turn at times into social workers, lawyers, state builders and peace makers going on ground patrols in “wars among the people” being proficient with the most cutting-edge technology as well as understanding and being immersed in many different cultures.  How are soldiers coping with this huge paradigm shift in what is expected of them?  Moreover, with the recent changes to policy regarding soldiers, such as the Armed Forces Covenant, as well as the current measures of forced redundancy being implemented within the military, how are soldiers and their families dealing with the added strain of modern military service?

This multinational multidisciplinary two-day conference will bring together academics, military personnel, policy makers and the third sector involved in issues pertaining to service personnel in order to address these issues.  This conference, funded by the Royal British Legion and the Department of Politics at the University of Reading will form the first event of a year-long project led by Ms Dentry-Travis and funded by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC), aimed at addressing the apparent gap in understanding between the Service Community and the wider public.

Speakers in this conference include Professor Hew Strachan and Professor Sir Adam Roberts (University of Oxford).

For more information and for the full list of speakers and details of how to register to attend the conference, please view the conference poster.

 

Contact Sarah J Dentry-Travis

Sat 23 June 2012, 09:00

'The Two Sudans after One Year'

Speaker: (Various)

The Sudanese Programme

[Sponsored by the Middle East Centre and Africa Studies Centre]

Conference on

“The Two Sudans after One Year”

Nissan Lecture Theatre, St. Antony’s College

Saturday 23rd June 2012

9.00 am – 7.00 pm

Provisional Programme

  9.00 – 10.00                    Coffee and Registration [The Buttery]

10.00 – 10.15                    Opening Remarks

Session 1

10.15- 11.00                     Professor Al-Tayib Zain Al-Abdin (University of Khartoum, Republic of Sudan)

“The Suspended Issues Between the Two Sudans: A Way to Peace or Conflict”

11.00 - 11.30                     Coffee [Buttery, Hilda Besse Building]

Session 2

11.30 – 12.15                    Speaker (details will follow)

12.15 – 1.00                      Responses from:

Dr Lual Deng  ( Managing Director, Ebony Centre for Strategic Studies, Juba, Republic of South Sudan)

Professor Karrar Abbadi  (Vice-Chancellor, Omdurman Ahlia University, Omdurman, Republic of Sudan)

1.00 – 2.30                        Lunch [Dinning Hall, St. Antony’s College]

Session 3

2.30 – 4.00                        Q&A and Comments from participants

 

4.00 – 4.30                        Tea [Buttery, Hilda Besse Building]

Session 4

4.30 ­­- 6.00                         Q&A and Comments from participants

 

6.00 – 7.00                        Reception [The Buttery, Hilda Besse Building]

 

End of Conference

 

In case of queries, please contact Dr Ahmed Al-Shahi at:

Ahmed.al-shahi@sant.ox.ac.uk

Tel: 01865- 284707

 

Please Observe

The Sudanese Programme follows the Chatham House Rule:

“When a meeting, or part thereof, is held under the Chatham House Rule, participants are free to use the information received, but neither the identity nor the affiliation of the speaker(s), nor that of any other participants, may be revealed”

Fri 08 June 2012 to Fri 08 June 2012, 11:30

'Democratic Innovations, Economic Challenges and the Future of the European Project'

Speaker: Graham Smith (Southampton) & Albena Azmanova (Kent University)

Venue:Lecture Theatre, Manor Road Building

'Democratic Innovations, Economic Challenges and the Future of the European Project'

Convenors: Kalypso Nicolaidis and Stuart White, DPIR

 (sandwiches served)

Lecture Theatre, Manor Road Building

Panel 1: 11:30 to 12:45

Graham Smith, Southampton University. Democratic Innovations in the European Union: Flirting with Deliberative and Plebiscitary Designs

Panel 2: 1:00 to 2:30

Albena Azmanova, Kent University. The New Spirit of Capitalism and the Soul of the Left: on some recent paradoxes of political judgment in reanimating the European project

Graham Smith is Professor in Politics at the University of Southampton. He is the author of Democratic Innovations: Designing Institutions for Citizen Participation(Cambridge University Press, 2009), in which he provides a critical overview of recent attempts to deepen democratic practice through initiatives such as citizens’ juries and participatory budgeting.

Albena Azmanova is Director of the International Political Economy programme of Kent University’s Brussels School of International Studies. After taking active participation in the dissident movements that brought down the communist regime in her native Bulgaria in 1987-1990, she studied European Law at Strasbourg University, did her doctoral studies at the New School for Social Research in New York, and taught political theory at the Institut d’Etudes Politics (Sciences Po.) in Paris, before taking her current post at the University of Kent. Her writing bridges political and social philosophy and sociology and focuses on democratic transition and consolidation, European integration, social justice, and the transformation of political ideologies.

http://www.kent.ac.uk/brussels/BSIS/staff/azmanova.html

Talk: As the financial crisis evolves into economic crisis, followed by a social crisis, the European Union is promoting further neoliberal economic reforms and, in the form of the new Fiscal Pact, is consolidating the institutional framework of the neoliberal economic logic that engendered the current triple crisis in Europe. Notwithstanding sparks of street protests and bankers-bashing, society bears the pain with relative equanimity. Subsequently, rather than being in crisis, neoliberal capitalism is consolidating – and the severe social consequences of this consolidation are only deepened by misdirected intellectual critique and political protest. Citizens and public authorities in Europe seem equally trapped in what Kant called “the scandal of reason”: reason’s propensity to get entangled it its own contradictions and thus fall pray either to dogma or to uncertainty. Drawing on her new book, The Scandal of Reason, A Critical Theory of Political Judgment(Columbia University Press, 2012), Albena Azmanova will address some of the dilemmas policy-making and social critique have refused to confront, thus shedding light on policy roads not taken, yet still available.

Paper

Hosted by the Centre for International Studies, the Public Policy Unit, and the European Studies Centre

This event is part of the Public Policy Unit Seminar Series seminar series.

Fri 08 June 2012, 13:00

'The New Spirit of Capitalism, the Soul of the Left, and the Moribund EU: on some recent paradoxes of political judgment in reanimating the European project'

Speaker: Dr Albena Azmanova (Kent)

Venue:European Studies Centre

Fri 08 June 2012, 15:00

'Linguistic Justice for the EU: linguistic convergence versus linguistic territoriality'

Speaker: Philippe Van Parijs

Venue:Oxford Law Faculty, The Cube, St Cross Building, St Cross Road, Oxford

Justice and Democracy beyond the nation-state: lessons from and for Europe
Convenors: Dr Pavlos Eleftheriadis, Professor Cécile Fabre, Professor David Miller, Professor Kalypso Nicolaïdis and Professor Philippe van Parijs

Fri 08 June 2012, 17:00

'The Global Crisis of the Advanced Economies - Challenges for the Central Banks and for European Governance'

Speaker: M. Jean-Claude Trichet (Gouverneur Honorifique Banque de France), Lord Patten of Barnes (Chancellor, University of Oxford)

Venue:Nissan Lecture Theatre, St. Antony's College

Convener: Jane Caplan

(Places available on a first come first served basis.)

Tue 05 June 2012, 13:30

The politics of the Greek crisis

Speaker: Nikos Kotzias, University of Piraeus & former Ambassador of the Greek Ministry of Foreign Affairs

Venue:Seminar Room, European Studies Centre 70 Woodstock

The politics of the Greek crisis

A conversation with Nikos Kotzias (Professor at the University of Piraeus)

Nikos Kotzias teaches at the Department of International and European Studies at the University of Piraeus, and is a former Ambassador of the Greek Ministry of Foreign Affairs. 

Tuesday 5 June, 13:30

Please bring your lunch

Seminar Room, European Studies Centre, 70 Woodstock Road

For more information, please contact julie.adams@sant.ox.ac.uk

This event is part of the SEESOX Seminar Series seminar series.

Fri 01 June 2012, 15:00

'Solidarity, distributive justice and fairness'

Speaker: Andrea Sangiovanni (KCL)

Venue:Oxford Law Faculty, The Cube, St Cross Building, St Cross Road, Oxford

Justice and Democracy beyond the nation-state: lessons from and for Europe
Convenors: Dr Pavlos Eleftheriadis, Professor Cécile Fabre, Professor David Miller, Professor Kalypso Nicolaïdis and Professor Philippe van Parijs

Tue 29 May 2012

Screening and discussion of 'Beynelmilel' (The International)

Speaker: Ece Temelkuran (Freelance journalist)

Venue:Seminar Room, European Studies Centre 70 Woodstock

Convenors: Kerem Öktem and Laurent Mignon

Fri 25 May 2012, 15:00

'Justice, Solidarity and the EU's Financial/Monetary Institutions'

Speaker: Kalypso Nicolaïdis & Juri Viehof

Venue:Law Board Room, Faculty of Law

Justice and Democracy beyond the nation-state: lessons from and for Europe
Convenors: Dr Pavlos Eleftheriadis, Professor Cécile Fabre, Professor David Miller, Professor Kalypso Nicolaïdis and Professor Philippe van Parijs

Thu 24 May 2012 to Fri 25 May 2012, 15:30

Basque Visiting Fellowship Workshop: 'The European External Action Service and the Changing Global Diplomatic System'

Speaker: Noé Cornago and Graham Avery (Convenors)

Venue:Seminar Room, European Studies Centre 70 Woodstock

The creation of the European External Action Service (EEAS) can be considered as one of the most
important institutional innovations in the recent history of European integration. The launching of the
EEAS in January 2011 signified a political commitment by the EU in a field that has crucial
implications for national diplomatic systems and the inter-institutional balance within the EU. Although
the political, legal and institutional dimensions of EEAS have been widely discussed, time has now
passed since its inception, and the international context in which EEAS is operating demands a new
discussion not only about its implications for the European polity but also its accommodation in the
wider international context and the new global diplomatic constellation.
The aim of this conference at the European Studies Centre, St. Antony’s College, Oxford, is to
contribute – with the participation of academic experts and top-level practitioners – to a well-informed
reflection on the potential of the EEAS as an instrument for the design and implementation of a more
effective European diplomacy, in the context of the wider on-going transformation of the global
diplomatic system, and the present realities of the European project.
The subject will be examined under different perspectives in three sessions:
The EEAS as a diplomatic innovation
The EEAS and the EU’s new international role
The EEAs and the changing European diplomacy and culture
This will be followed by a round-table and general discussion on the theme:
Europe and the global diplomatic system
The conference is organised by Noé Cornago & Graham Avery (Co-convenors) with the assistance of
Anne-Laure Guillermain (Administrator, European Studies Centre) & Alessandro Tonoli (St Antony’s
College and European Commission).
It takes place in the Seminar Room of the European Studies Centre at 70 Woodstock Road, Oxford,
OX2 6HR
Graduate students and members of the University are welcome (please register in advance at
european.studies@sant.ox.ac.uk)

Wed 23 May 2012, 17:15

'Civil Resistance in Burma' and 'Re-branding Ethnic Conflict in Sri Lanka'

Speaker: Zaw Nay Aung and Frances Harrison

Venue:Manor Road Building, Seminar Room D

Centre for International Studies Special Seminar

'Civil Resistance in Burma: from Defiant Resistance to Deficient Movements'

Zaw Nay Aung, founder and director of Burma Independence Advocates and the Department’s Charles Wallace Burma Trust Visiting Research Fellow.

'Re-branding Ethnic Conflict in Sri Lanka'

Frances Harrison, former BBC correspondent in Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Iran. Author of 'Still Counting the Dead: Stories from Sri Lanka's Killing Fields' (forthcoming)

Chaired by Sarmila Bose (Senior Research Associate at the Centre for International Studies) and with introduction from Kalypso Nicolaïdis (Director, Centre for International Studies)

5.15pm in Seminar Room D of the Manor Road Building, Manor Road, Oxford. All are welcome.

For further information please contact cis@politics.ox.ac.uk. 

Tue 22 May 2012, 17:00

'Europe and Migration: A Call for Action'

Speaker: Charles Clarke (Visiting Professor, University of East Anglia)

Venue:Seminar Room, European Studies Centre 70 Woodstock

This event is part of the Debating Europe in a Non-European World seminar series.

Sat 19 May 2012, 09:30

OxPeace Day Conference: 'Disciplines of Peace'

Speaker: (Various)

Venue:Garden Quad Auditorium, St John’s College

Day-Conference Saturday 19 May 2012:  09.30 registration and coffee, ends by 17.30.

The Day-Conference will begin with two morning plenary speakers, Prof. Richard Caplan (Oxford, DPIR) on the definitions of peace making, building and keeping, and Dan Smith OBE of International Alert, on the practical skills needed in the field. 

The afternoon session will include two sets of two breakout sessions:

Law and Human Rights in relation to Peace
Religion and Theology in relation to Peace
AND
The discipline of Peace Studies 
Practical skills of peacemakers and builders

 Registration for the Saturday 19 May Day-Conference is free of charge (a small contribution of £4 per student, £8 per non-student will be asked on the day to cover the cost of sandwich lunch and refreshments). 

 

Preceded by Conference Dinner on Friday 18 May in Rewley House Dining Room.

 The Conference Dinner at Rewley House features guest speaker Simon Hughes, Liberal Democratic MP for Southwark and Bermondsey, who is co-chair of the All-Party Parliamentary Group on Conflict Issues (APPGCI).

Created in 2006, the APPGCI has regular open meetings to promote dialogue between parliamentarians, Her Majesty's Government, and civil society on alternative methods of preventing and resolving violent conflict. The APPGCI discusses capacity building and resource allocation relating to conflict prevention, non-violent conflict resolution and peace building both in the UK and internationally, and brings together officials from the Department for International Development (DFID), the Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) and the Ministry of Defence (MoD), various NGOs, academics, students and youth, members of the business community and the media.

Simon Hughes led the second-ever 90-minute debate in Parliament devoted to conflict prevention on 21 June 2011, crucial in the development of the government’s strategy in this area. Mr. Hughes will speak on the aim of APPCGI ‘to challenge traditional attitudes held in Parliament and HMG towards conflict’, by shifting focus to improving resource allocation and increasing capacity for early-warning and conflict prevention initiatives, and moving toward ‘an integrated top-down/bottom up approach with stronger involvement of local peace builders.’

Mr. Hughes is also a member of the Parliamentarians Network for Conflict Prevention. This global network of parliamentarians is dedicated to preventing conflict turning violent through the mobilization of global political will and resources. The Network seeks to apply its collective early warning capacity to raise government, media, and public attention to prospective violent conflicts. As a network member, Mr. Hughes is involved with collaboration between parliaments on issues of preventative action and human security, as well as international efforts to influence legislation to prevent conflict, and institutionalize preventative diplomacy

 

 

Any enquiries as to registration or requests for further information about the Dinner and Speaker or the Day-Conference should be sent to Trisha.Mittal@sant.ox.ac.uk.

Further information available on OxPeace at: http://cis.politics.ox.ac.uk/research/Projects/oxpeace.asp

Contact Trisha Mittal

Fri 18 May 2012, 15:00

'Citizenship and obligation in the EU'

Speaker: Pavlos Eleftheriadis,

Venue:Oxford Law Faculty, The Cube, St Cross Building, St Cross Road, Oxford

Justice and Democracy beyond the nation-state: lessons from and for Europe
Convenors: Dr Pavlos Eleftheriadis, Professor Cécile Fabre, Professor David Miller, Professor Kalypso Nicolaïdis and Professor Philippe van Parijs

Thu 17 May 2012, 12:30

Panel Discussion: 'Religion in War and Peace'

Speaker: (Various)

Venue:Manor Road Building, Seminar Room A

Speakers: Professor Nigel Biggar (Oxford), Professor Tony Coady (CAPPE) and Dr Rama Mani (Oxford), Chair Professor Jennifer Welsh.

Thu 17 May 2012, 17:15

'Overcoming the Sovereign Debt Crisis: Europe's Roadmap to Stability and Growth'

Speaker: Olli Rehn (Vice-President of the European Commission responsible for Economic and Monetary Affairs)

Venue:Seminar Room, European Studies Centre 70 Woodstock

Chair: Kalypso Nicolaïdis (ESC, DPIR)

Discussant: Max Watson (ESC)

 

European Studies Centre, 70 Woodstock Road. Please contact european.studies@sant.ox.ac.uk or telephone 01865 274470

Mon 14 May 2012, 10:30

'Europe after the Crisis: How to Sustain a Common Currency'

Venue:Centre for European Studies, 70 Woodstock Road

An informal discussion with Andrew Moravcsik, Professor of Politics and International Affairs and Director, European Union Program, Woodrow Wilson School, Princeton University

 

Around his recent article in Foreign Affairs on:

“Europe after the Crisis: How to Sustain a Common Currency," 

Foreign Affairs 91:3 (May-June 2012).

 

http://www.princeton.edu/~amoravcs/library/after_crisis.pdf

http://www.princeton.edu/~amoravcs/library/ps.pdf

(Short version in The New York Times)

 

Professor Moravcsik is also speaking on the same day on "The Coming Revolution in Qualitative Methods: Active Citation and Political Science". For further information please see here.

Mon 14 May 2012, 12:30

'The Coming Revolution in Qualitative Methods: Active Citation and Political Science'

Speaker: Andrew Moravcsik

Venue:Lecture Theatre, Manor Road Building

Andrew Moravcsik is Professor of Politics and International Affairs and Director, European Union Program, Woodrow Wilson School, Princeton University

Chaired by: Kalypso Nicolaidis, Professor of International Relations, University of Oxford

See Active Citation: A Precondition for Replicable Qualitative Research

Professor Moravcsik is also speaking on the same day around his recent article in Foreign Affairs on: “Europe after the Crisis: How to Sustain a Common Currency." For further information please see here

Fri 11 May 2012, 15:00

'On the ethics of a common European defence policy'

Speaker: Cécile Fabre

Venue:Oxford Law Faculty, The Cube, St Cross Building, St Cross Road, Oxford

Justice and Democracy beyond the nation-state: lessons from and for Europe
Convenors: Dr Pavlos Eleftheriadis, Professor Cécile Fabre, Professor David Miller, Professor Kalypso Nicolaïdis and Professor Philippe van Parijs

Thu 10 May 2012

'Fambul Tok: "Family talk" - A new model for post-conflict reconciliation, peacebuilding and development'

Speaker: (Various)

Venue:TS Eliot Theatre, Merton College

‘Fambul Tok’ is a community-based method for reconciliation and peacebuilding, developed in Sierra Leone. Research is currently being carried out in Oxford and elsewhere on its effectiveness in promoting grassroots economic development. Film with speakers and discussion. Joint with African Studies and OTJR.

All welcome.

Contact Dr Julia Amos

Tue 08 May 2012, 17:00

'Role and Meaning of “Partnership” Under the EU Neighbourhood Policy'

Speaker: Elena A. Korosteleva (Aberystwyth)

Venue:European Studies Centre

Discussants: Gwen Sasse (DPIR) and Julie Newton (St. Antony’s); Chair: Kalypso Nicolaïdis

Fri 04 May 2012 to Sat 05 May 2012

'Religion, Spirituality and Global Governance'

Speaker: Various

Venue:Manor Road Building

This conference aims to foster an interdisciplinary exchange to deepen our understanding of the paradoxical role of religion and spirituality in the contemporary social and political context, and its potential to shape global governance.

 

Full details for the conference, including the programme, can be found on the main event website

 

Please click here to register (there is no registration fee)

The conference will be held in the Lecture Theatre and Seminar Room A of the Manor Road Building, University of Oxford. Directions can be found on the Finding Us page.

A light lunch and refreshments will be provided for all participants.

 

This conference is made possible with the generous support of the Centre for International Studies, the Academic Council on the United Nations System and the Center for Sustainable Development & International Peace.

Fri 04 May 2012, 09:30

'The EU's Institutions: the State of the Art'

Speaker: Convenors: John Peterson, Michael Shackleton and Kalypso Nicolaïdis

A workshop @ St Antony’s College’s European Studies Centre, Oxford

upon publication of John Peterson & Michael Shackleton (eds.)

The Institutions of the European Union

(Oxford University Press, 2012), 3rd edition

 

09.30                           Coffee and Welcome

09.45 – 11.00              ‘Managing the Union’

Does the EU’s lack of hierarchy inevitably mean under-management and political drift?  Has the Lisbon Treaty helped to shrink the management deficit?  How well has the ECB ‘managed’ the sovereign debt crisis?  Do new institutions – OLAF, European Agencies and the European Public Prosecutor – represent management innovations?

John Peterson, Professor of International Politics, University of Edinburgh

Commentary: Mark Gray, European Commission

11.00                           coffee/tea break

11.15-12.30                 ‘Integrating Interests’ in the EU’

Should we be re-engineering the EU’s institutional balance and the Community method? Are various conflicting interests in the EU adequately represented in the current configuration? What shall we make of current developments and the presumed drift towards intergovernmentalism?

Kalypso Nicolaïdis, Professor of International Relations, University of Oxford

Commentary: Anthony Teasdale, European Parliament

12.30-13.30                 Lunch break

13.30-15.00                 ‘Providing Direction’ in the EU’

Is the EU’s leadership deficit ‘chronic’, with powers now more widely shared than ever before in the Union’s history?  Or do new institutions – the European Council Presidency and High Representative – promise to close it?  Can past sources of leadership – the Franco-German alliance or Commission President – be resurrected? 

Michael Shackleton, Maastricht University

Commentary: Richard Corbett, European Council

15.00-15.15                 Conclusions

Convenors: John Peterson and Michael Shackleton (with Kalypso Nicolaïdis)

For further information contact: anne-laure.guillermain@sant.ox.ac.uk

Fri 04 May 2012, 15:00

'The Crisis of European demoi-cracy'

Speaker: Kalypso Nicolaïdis, discussant: David Miller

Venue: The Cube, Law Faculty

This event is part of the series 'Justice and Democracy Beyond the Nation-State: Lessons from and for Europe', convened by Dr Pavlos Eleftheriadis, Professor Cécile Fabre, Professor David Miller, Professor Kalypso Nicolaïdis and Professor Philippe van Parijs

 

Fri 04 May 2012, 17:30

'Quo Vadis Global Governance: Civilizational Challenges Facing the United Nations

Speaker: Various

Venue:Lecture Theatre, Manor Road Building

Public Panel Discussion

Celebrating the 25th Anniversary of the Academic Council on the United Nations System

Quo Vadis Global Governance? 

Civilizational Challenges Facing the United Nations

Friday 4th May at 5.30 pm

Lecture Hall, Department of Politics and International Relations, University of Oxford Manor Road, Oxford OX1 3UQ

Reception: 7 to 8.30 pm

CHAIR:

ADAM ROBERTS, President, British Academy, Senior Research Fellow, CIS

SPEAKERS:

'Can Media and Education transform Cultural Dissonance to Peaceful Global Governance?'

by PILAR ALVAREZ-LASO, Assistant Secretary-General for Social and Human Sciences, UNESCO

'From Brute Force to Inner Power to Sustain Global Peace and Security'

by SCILLA ELWORTHY, Founder of Oxford Research Group and Peace Direct, Advisor to the Elders, Winner of Niwano Peace Prize

'ACUNS at 25: Diplomacy and Cultural and Religious Diversity in Global Governance'

by CHRISTER JÖNSSON, Lund University; Chair, ACUNS

Public Reception hosted by ACUNS:  7 - 8.30 pm:

Introduction by ALISTAIR EDGAR, Executive Director, ACUNS

About ACUNS: The Academic Council on the United Nations System (ACUNS) is a global professional association of educational and research institutions, individual scholars, and practitioners active in the work and study of multilateral relations, global governance, and international cooperation.

Membership information, activities and promotional membership offers will be made available at the reception

For more information visit www.acuns.org

This public panel discussion is open to all. Please inform Rama Mani (Rama.Mani@politics.ox.ac.uk) if you plan to attend 

This panel discussion is part of the 'International Conference on Religion, Spirituality and Global Governance' at the Department for Politics and International Relations, from Friday 4 May and Saturday 5 May 2012.

 Convened by the Academic Council on the United Nations System (ACUNS), The Centre for International Studies (CIS), University of Oxford and The Center for Sustainable Development & International Peace (SDIP), Korbel School, University of Denver. 

For further information and to register for the whole conference, please visit:    http://cis.politics.ox.ac.uk/events/Religion-Spirituality-Governance.asp

Tue 01 May 2012, 17:00

'Policy Learning in the EU: Theory and Meta-Theory'

Speaker: Claudio Radaelli (Exeter)

Venue:European Studies Centre

Discussants: Sophie Heine (DPIR) and Gjovalin Macaj (DPIR)

Convener: Kalypso Nicolaïdis

European Studies Centre, 70 Woodstock Road

To received background paper please contact european.studies@sant.ox.ac.uk or telephone 01865 274470

This event is part of the Debating Europe in a Non-European World seminar series.

Thu 26 April 2012, 17:00

'The Future of International Statebuilding: Lessons from the last two decades'

Venue:Manor Road Building, Seminar Room C

You are invited to a panel discussion. Speakers will include:

Chair: Prof Sir Adam Roberts (President of the British Academy) Prof. Richard Caplan (Oxford) Prof Christopher Clapham (Cambridge) Prof James Mayall FBA (Cambridge) Dr Ricardo Soares de Oliveira (Oxford)

This will be followed by a drinks reception and the launch of “The New Protectorates: International Tutelage and the Making of Liberal States”, eds. James Mayall and Ricardo Soares de Oliveira (Hurst Publishers).

Thu 12 April 2012 to Fri 13 April 2012

'Rallying to the R2P cause? The international politics of Human Rights.'

Speaker: (Various)

PANEL I: The Responsibility to Prevent Revisited

PANEL II: The Responsibility to React

The full programme of events can be seen here.

Please note that this is a closed event that is only available to those who sign up in advance.  However, students working on these issues are welcome to attend.  If you would like to attend, please email Monica Serrano (mserrano@colmex.mx) and Nomvuyo Nolutshungu (nnolutshungu@gc.cuny.edu)

Wed 28 March 2012 to Thu 29 March 2012

Maritime Security Conference

Speaker: (Various)

Venue:TS Eliot Theatre, Merton College

Maritime security (crime and conflict prevention; piracy and its causes, drug smuggling, etc). Joint with Merton College and the Naval Staff Strategy Unit.

Contact Dr Julia Amos

Thu 08 March 2012, 14:30

'Decision making in 72 international organizations: Why so much supranationalism?'

Speaker: Liesbet Hooghe, Gary Marks (University of North Caroline at Chapel Hill)

Venue:Large Lecture Room, Nuffield College

All welcome. This lecture is organized by the Anglo-German State of the State Lecture Series, the Current Research in European Union Politics Seminar Series, the Centre for International Studies and the European Studies Centre.

See poster.

This event is part of the State of the State Lecture Series seminar series.

Contact Heike Klüver

Thu 08 March 2012, 17:00

'The Bourgeois Revolution as an International Process'

Speaker: Neil Davidson

Venue:Manor Road Building, Seminar Room C

 The Historical Materialism and International Relations seminar series seeks to explore and develop the multiple points of contact between Marxist theory and international relations, most broadly defined. It does so with the double aim of investigating the critical and explanatory potentials of Marxism in the domain of international relations, as well as to probe what an engagement with ‘the international’ might contribute to Marxist theory. The seminar series is associated with the journal of Historical Materialism: Research in Critical Marxist Theory and its forthcoming ‘Historical Materialism and International Relations’ book series.

The seminars will be given at 5 pm on Thursdays in Seminar Room C, Department of Politics and International Relations. Convener: Alexander Anievas.

 

 

Neil Davidson

8 Mar.: ‘The Bourgeois Revolution as an International Process’

 

The concept of bourgeois revolution is one of the most controversial in Marxist historiography and in recent years it has been dismissed as irrelevant by several important schools of thought, including World Systems theory (Wallerstein, Gunder Frank) and Political Marxism (Brenner, Wood). In this talk, Neil Davidson will attempt to defend the explanatory power of the concept, but will also argue that it can only be understood as referring, not only to a succession of individual revolutions (England, America, France...) but also to an extended international process, the whole of which was greater than the sum of these parts. Beginning with the Reformation and only concluding with decolonisation after the Second World War, the capitalist world which emerged from it did not inherit the pre-existing absolutist states system, but created an entirely new one in which the component states had been reconfigured as independent centres of capital accumulation.


Neil Davidson is Senior Research Fellow with the School of Applied Social Science at the University of Strathclyde. He is Author of The Origins of Scottish Nationhood (2000), Discovering the Scottish Revolution (2003), for which he was awarded the Deutscher Memorial Prize and co-editor and contributor to Alasdair MacIntyre's Engagement with Marxism: Selected Writings, 1953-1974 (2008) and Neoliberal Scotland (2010). He has two books coming out next year: How Revolutionary Were the Bourgeois Revolutions? and Violating all the Laws of History: Combined Development, Nation-states, and Neoliberal Capitalism.

 

This event is part of the Historical Materialism and International Relations seminar series.

Tue 06 March 2012, 17:00

'Lessons from Iraq and Afghanistan'

Speaker: Ms Lindy Cameron, Department for International Development, former head of office in Iraq and Afghanistan and former head of Helmand Provincial Reconstruction Team

Venue:Lecture Theatre, Manor Road Building

This seminar will take place from 5-6.30 pm in the Lecture Theatre, Department of Politics and International Relations, Manor Road Building. Convenor: Professor Richard Caplan.

This event is part of the Post-Conflict State Building: Practitioners' Perspectives seminar series.

Tue 06 March 2012, 19:30

“I want to build Peace“: grassroots post-conflict peacebuilding in Eastern DRC

Speaker: (Various)

Venue:Garden Quad Auditorium, St John’s College

Open seminar. Short monologue play, ‘The Peacebuilder’, on the work of Henri Ladyi (North Kivu Province, DRC). Responses and input from Dr Phil Clark (SOAS and OTJR) and speakers from Peace Direct and International Alert. Discussion, drinks reception. Joint with Oxford Transitional Justice Research (OTJR), OPRT and Peaceroots.

All welcome.

Fri 02 March 2012, 13:00

'The real politics of the Warsaw Pact in the 1960s'

Speaker: Laurien Crump (University of Utrecht & Visiting Fellow, St Antony’s)

Venue:Dahrendorf Room, Founder’s Building at St Antony’s

Convenor: Alex Pravda (St Antony’s)

Laurien Crump is currently completing a study on the multilateralisation of the Warsaw Pact in the 1960s. This draws on new archival material from the former GDR and Romania and sheds new light on the ways in which the non-Soviet Warsaw Pact members used the Warsaw Pact as an instrument to exercise influence on the Soviet leadership.

Thu 01 March 2012, 17:00

'Fatal Attraction: a critique of Carl Schmitt's international political and legal theory'

Speaker: Benno Teschke

Venue:Manor Road Building, Seminar Room C

 The Historical Materialism and International Relations seminar series seeks to explore and develop the multiple points of contact between Marxist theory and international relations, most broadly defined. It does so with the double aim of investigating the critical and explanatory potentials of Marxism in the domain of international relations, as well as to probe what an engagement with ‘the international’ might contribute to Marxist theory. The seminar series is associated with the journal of Historical Materialism: Research in Critical Marxist Theory and its forthcoming ‘Historical Materialism and International Relations’ book series.

The seminars will be given at 5 pm on Thursdays in Seminar Room C, Department of Politics and International Relations. Convener: Alexander Anievas.

 

 

Benno Teschke

1 Mar.: ‘Fatal Attraction: a critique of Carl Schmitt's international political and legal theory’

The ongoing Schmitt revival has extended Carl Schmitt's reach over the fields of international legal and political theory. Neo-Schmittians suggest that his international thought provides a new reading of the history of international law and order, which validates the explanatory power of his theoretical premises – the concept of the political, political decisionism, and concrete-order-thinking. Against this background, this article mounts a systematic reappraisal of Schmitt's international thought in a historical perspective. The argument is that his work requires re-contextualization as the intellectual product of an ultra-intense moment in Schmitt's friend/enemy distinction. It inscribed Hitler's ‘spatial revolution’ into a full-scale reinterpretation of Europe's geopolitical history, grounded in land appropriations, which legitimized Nazi Germany's wars of conquest. Consequently, Schmitt's elevation of the early modern nomos as the model for civilized warfare – the ‘golden age’ of international law – against which American legal universalism can be portrayed as degenerated, is conceptually and empirically flawed. Schmitt devised a politically motivated set of theoretical premises to provide a historical counter-narrative against liberal normativism, which generated defective history. The reconstruction of this history reveals the explanatory limits of his theoretical vocabulary – friend/enemy binary, sovereignty-as-exception, nomos/universalism – for past and present analytical purposes. Schmitt's defective analytics and problematic history compromise the standing of his work for purposes of international theory.

Benno Teschke completed his doctorate in the Department of International Relations at the London School of Economics and Political Science and is currently a Senior Lecturer in the Department of International Relations at the University of Sussex and a Visiting Research Fellow at the European Research Council funded ‘Research Project Europe 1815–1914’ at the University of Helsinki. He is the author of The Myth of 1648: Class, Geopolitics and the Making of Modern International Relations (2003), which was awarded the Isaac Deutscher Memorial Prize. More recently, he has published in the New Left Review and in International Theory on the international thought of Carl Schmitt and is preparing a monograph on the subject.

 

This event is part of the Historical Materialism and International Relations seminar series.

Wed 29 February 2012, 16:00

'What is to be Done?' Come and debate on the European Crisis

Speaker: Daniel Cohn-Bendit (MEP, Greens), Edouard Gaudot (EP)

Venue:The Combined Common Room, St. Antony's College

Chair:  Kalypso Nicolaïdis (ESC)

*Please note the change of time and venue: 4pm, the Common Room at St Antony's College*

This event will be followed by “The Arab Uprising One Year On”, Nissan Auditorium 5pm, with Daniel Cohn-Bendit’s participation.

The European Studies Centre is located at 70 Woodstock Road. 

Mon 27 February 2012, 17:00

‘Sixty years of interviews’

Speaker: Sir David Butler

Venue:Pitt Rivers Museum Lecture Room

Monday 5 March 5pm Pitt Rivers Museum Lecture Room
Sir David Butler, ‘Sixty years of interviews’

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF THE BOOK, BODLEIAN LIBRARY, OXFORD

Bodleian Masterclasses: Authorship, memory and manuscripts: political biography and historical resources

Co-Chaired by Professor Martin Ceadel (New College), and Professor Anne Deighton (Wolfson College)

Convenor, Helen Langley, curator of modern political papers, Bodleian Library

 

This year’s four seminars in the Modern Political Manuscripts series, held fortnightly during Hilary Term, explore the ways in which historians approach the writing of political biography, and how private papers become historical resources. The first two speakers will introduce documents from the Bodleian’s modern political manuscript collections before outlining the significance to their research and more generally. The second two speakers will describe archives ‘in transition’.

All welcome; please register in advance by emailing bookcentre@bodleian.ox.ac.uk  stating the dates you wish to attend.

 

Thu 23 February 2012, 16:00

Sierra Leone Elections 2012: 'Between Democracy and Violence'

Speaker: Mats Utas (Nordic Africa Institute), David Harris (School of Oriental and African Studies)

Venue:Clay Room, Nuffield College

Sierra Leone has been praised as a peacebuilding success for its recovery from a civil war, which officially ended in 2002. Ten years on, the November 2012 elections are expected to be the test of this stability but renewed political violence in recent months raises questions about the nature of the country’s path to peace and democracy. What is at stake in these elections? Who are the key players? What will the elections mean for the peacebuilding process? This workshop will bring together Sierra Leone experts to discuss these issues.

 

Speakers

Mats Utas (Nordic Africa Institute)

Mats Utas is Associate Professor in Cultural Anthropology at the Nordic Africa Institute, Uppsala as well as the Head of the Africa Programme at the Swedish National Defence College. He has written extensively on youth, ex-combatants, urban poverty and election-related violence in West Africa. He conducted fieldwork on these issues in Sierra Leone while being senior lecturer in sociology at Fourah Bay College (University of Sierra Leone). In this workshop, Mats will reflect on his fieldwork in Freetown with a particular focus on youth politics and electoral violence.

 

David Harris (School of Oriental and African Studies)

David Harris is Senior Teaching Fellow at SOAS and his research focus is on the politics of Sierra Leone and Liberia, specifically elections after conflict, post-conflict justice, rebel groups and political parties.  He has been a member of several Election Observation Delegations in Sierra Leone and Liberia. He recently published a book called Civil War and Democracy in West Africa: Conflict Resolution, Elections and Justice in Sierra Leone and Liberia. In this workshop, David will discuss the upcoming elections placing the Sierra Leone case in regional perspective through a comparison with the recent Liberian experience.

 

After speakers’ presentations, the floor will be open for discussion.

 All welcome.  For information and registration email luisa.enria@qeh.ox.ac.uk

 

This event is in association with the Oxford Network of Peace Studies (OxPeace)

Thu 23 February 2012, 17:00

'Uneven Developments, Combined: Gramsci and Trotsky on Permanent Revolution'

Speaker: Peter Thomas

Venue:Manor Road Building, Seminar Room C

 The Historical Materialism and International Relations seminar series seeks to explore and develop the multiple points of contact between Marxist theory and international relations, most broadly defined. It does so with the double aim of investigating the critical and explanatory potentials of Marxism in the domain of international relations, as well as to probe what an engagement with ‘the international’ might contribute to Marxist theory. The seminar series is associated with the journal of Historical Materialism: Research in Critical Marxist Theory and its forthcoming ‘Historical Materialism and International Relations’ book series.

The seminars will be given at 5 pm on Thursdays in Seminar Room C, Department of Politics and International Relations. Convener: Alexander Anievas.

 

 

Peter Thomas

23.Feb: ‘Uneven Developments, Combined: Gramsci and Trotsky on Permanent Revolution’

Abstract: This paper will explore the different formulations of the notion of Permanent Revolution in the work of Antonio Gramsci and Leon Trotsky. Although Gramsci himself explicitly rejected Trotsky's notion of permanent revolution as a reversion to a strategy of 'war of movement', he also claimed that his development of the theory of hegemony could be regarded as a contemporary form of Marx and Engels's notion of the 'Revolution in Permanence'. The paper will analyse the similarities and differences of the two seemingly divergent claims to inherit a central perspective of the classical Marxist tradition, and will argue that thinking the concepts of permanent and passive revolution together enables us to clarify and to make explicit dimensions that remain underdeveloped in each theorist's respective work.

Peter Thomas is Lecturer in the History of Political Thought at Brunel University, London. He is the author of The Gramscian Moment: Philosophy, Hegemony and Marxism (Brill, 2009), and (with Juha Koivisto) Mapping Communication and Media Research: Conjunctures, Institutions, Challenges (Tampere University Press, 2010) and co-editor (with Riccardo Bellofiore and Guido Starosta) of In Marx’s Laboratory: Critical Interpretations of the Grundrisse (Brill, 2010). He has published widely on Marxist political theory and philosophy, the history of political thought and the history of philosophy.

This event is part of the Historical Materialism and International Relations seminar series.

Wed 22 February 2012, 17:00

A Debate: ‘The Future of Europe: Towards a Two-Speed EU?’

Speaker: (various)

Venue:Christ Church College

 On the Occasion of Jean-Claude Piris’ book launch

The Centre for International Studies, the Faculty of Law

and the European Studies Centre present:

Wednesday 22nd February 2012, 5-7pm

A Debate:

‘The Future of Europe: Towards a Two-Speed EU?’

Panellists: Jean-Claude Piris (author and former Director General of the Legal Service of the Council Secretariat), Kalypso Nicolaïdis (DPIR, CIS director), Pavlos Eleftheriadis (Law, Mansfield), Stephen Weatherill (Law, Somerville).

Jean-Claude Piris is known to all aficionados of EU affairs as a leading figure in the conception and drafting of the EU's legal structures, having spent the last decades at the heart of the EU Council. His new book tackles the current crisis and argues that the EU needs to become truly 'two-speed': allowing an inner core to move towards closer economic and political union, which will protect the Union as a whole. Compelling, critical and current, this book is essential reading for all those interested in the future of Europe.

All are welcome – Reception to follow

McKenna Room, Christ Church College, Oxford (please enter the college by the main entrance and follow the signage in place).

Tue 21 February 2012, 17:00

'Can the UN rebuild war-torn states?

Speaker: Mr Alan Doss, former Special Representative of the UN Secretary General in Liberia and Democratic Republic of Congo

Venue:St Cross Building, Oxford University

 This seminar will take place from 5-6.30 pm in the Department of Politics and International Relations (Seminar Room E). Convenor: Professor Richard Caplan.

Please note that seating is limited, so early attendance is advised.

 

Update: Please note a change of venue: this event will now take place in Seminar Room J, the St Cross Building.

This event is part of the Post-Conflict State Building: Practitioners' Perspectives seminar series.

Mon 20 February 2012, 17:00

‘The diary of Douglas Jay: from dictation to online resource’

Speaker: Mary, Lady Jay

Venue:Pitt Rivers Museum Lecture Room

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF THE BOOK, BODLEIAN LIBRARY, OXFORD

Bodleian Masterclasses: Authorship, memory and manuscripts: political biography and historical resources

Co-Chaired by Professor Martin Ceadel (New College), and Professor Anne Deighton (Wolfson College)

Convenor, Helen Langley, curator of modern political papers, Bodleian Library

 

This year’s four seminars in the Modern Political Manuscripts series, held fortnightly during Hilary Term, explore the ways in which historians approach the writing of political biography, and how private papers become historical resources. The first two speakers will introduce documents from the Bodleian’s modern political manuscript collections before outlining the significance to their research and more generally. The second two speakers will describe archives ‘in transition’.

All welcome; please register in advance by emailing bookcentre@bodleian.ox.ac.uk  stating the dates you wish to attend.

Thu 16 February 2012, 17:00

'Development under ‘the whip of external necessity’: the political economy of Hungary from 1989 to global economic crisis'

Speaker: Adam Fabry

Venue:Manor Road Building, Seminar Room C

 The Historical Materialism and International Relations seminar series seeks to explore and develop the multiple points of contact between Marxist theory and international relations, most broadly defined. It does so with the double aim of investigating the critical and explanatory potentials of Marxism in the domain of international relations, as well as to probe what an engagement with ‘the international’ might contribute to Marxist theory. The seminar series is associated with the journal of Historical Materialism: Research in Critical Marxist Theory and its forthcoming ‘Historical Materialism and International Relations’ book series. Convener: Alexander Anievas.

 

Abstract: Hungary has for long been a poster boy of neoliberal transformation in Central and Eastern Europe (CEE). However, since the negative effects of the global economic crisis started to be felt in 2008, its bon renommé in international policymaking and business circles quickly evaporated; indeed, the international business press has singled it out as a ‘black sheep’ of the current crisis. This ‘return to fame’ stems from the fact that the signs generally associated with the global crisis – financial meltdown, falling levels of production, growing unemployment and social inequalities, imposition of drastic austerity measures deemed necessary in order to return to a path of ‘sustainable’ growth, and, as a result, widespread disillusionment and public anger (often, though not exclusively, under the guise of rabid reactionary politics) – are all present in an exacerbated form in Hungary. This paper argues that the current economic malaise of Hungary necessitates a Marxist critique of the particular model of capitalist ‘development’, which has reigned since its ‘transition to the market’. In order to so, this paper will be structured in the following way: it begins with an overview and critique of mainstream narratives of the transformation in Central and Eastern Europe (CEE) since 1989, focusing in particular on neoliberal and Varieties of Capitalism (VOC) approaches. Against these readings, an alternative approach is suggested, based on the central tenets of Marxist political economy and building on the notion of uneven and combined development, as developed by Leon Trotsky. This interpretation situates the transformation of CEE economies in general, and Hungary in particular, within a broader historical process, emphasising the unevenness of their integration within the global economy since the 1970s and the way in which international and domestic social forces have mediated, contested and shaped this process. Finally, we ask whether Horace’s famous dictum – de te fabula narratur –, which Marx borrowed in the Preface to the First Edition to Capital. Volume One, might apply here as well (but turned on its head): does Hungary provide an example for a new configuration of capitalism and the state in times of crisis?

 

Adam Fabry is currently researching Hungary at Brunel University, London. His most recent publications include ‘From Poster Boy of Neoliberal Transformation to Basket Case: Hungary and the Global Economic Crisis’ in Gareth Dale (ed) First the Transition, Then the Crash (Pluto, 2011) and ‘End of the Liberal Dream: Hungary since 1989’ in International Socialism (2009).

This event is part of the Historical Materialism and International Relations seminar series.

Mon 13 February 2012, 17:00

Centre for the Study of the Book seminar: 'Work in Progress'

Speaker: Charlotte McKillop-Mash (the Jenkins archive), Jeremy McIlwaine (Conservative Party Archive)

Venue:Pitt Rivers Museum Lecture Room

'Work in Progress’- an opportunity to hear about current cataloguing projects – modern political papers (Charlotte McKillop-Mash: the Jenkins archive; Jeremy McIlwaine: the Conservative Party Archive)

 

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF THE BOOK, BODLEIAN LIBRARY, OXFORD

Bodleian Masterclasses: Authorship, memory and manuscripts: political biography and historical resources

Co-Chaired by Professor Martin Ceadel (New College), and Professor Anne Deighton (Wolfson College)

Convenor, Helen Langley, curator of modern political papers, Bodleian Library

 

This year’s four seminars in the Modern Political Manuscripts series, held fortnightly during Hilary Term, explore the ways in which historians approach the writing of political biography, and how private papers become historical resources. The first two speakers will introduce documents from the Bodleian’s modern political manuscript collections before outlining the significance to their research and more generally. The second two speakers will describe archives ‘in transition’.

All welcome; please register in advance by emailing bookcentre@bodleian.ox.ac.uk  stating the dates you wish to attend.

Thu 09 February 2012, 17:00

'Civilising Interventions? Race, War and International Law'

Speaker: Rob Knox

Venue:Manor Road Building, Seminar Room C

 The Historical Materialism and International Relations seminar series seeks to explore and develop the multiple points of contact between Marxist theory and international relations, most broadly defined. It does so with the double aim of investigating the critical and explanatory potentials of Marxism in the domain of international relations, as well as to probe what an engagement with ‘the international’ might contribute to Marxist theory. The seminar series is associated with the journal of Historical Materialism: Research in Critical Marxist Theory and its forthcoming ‘Historical Materialism and International Relations’ book series. Convener: Alexander Anievas.


Abstract: Over the past decade there has been a veritable explosion in literature on the relationship between imperialism and international law. This has been triggered – in no small part – by the wave of controversial military interventions that began with Kosovo and culminated in the continuing War on Terror. It is thus unsurprising that these interventions have been the target of much of the above scholarship, particular that of Third World Approaches to International Law (TWAIL).Drawing heavily on postcolonial theory, these accounts have foregrounded the issue of race and racial discourse, particularly in relation to humanitarian intervention and the war on terror. Essentially, they have argued that the law and legal rhetoric in these areas reproduces the colonial structures and civilising mission of international law’s past. On this reading, what is key to both the war on terror and humanitarian intervention is that they portray peripheral countries as savages (and/or victims) in need of civilising (and/or saving). With this comes an embedded assumption that only ‘civilised’ states have the capacity to go to war, with ‘uncivilised’ states being open to almost perpetual intervention. This particular deployment is generally part of a larger argument, whereby international law is seen as driven by the processes of creating racial or cultural ‘others’.Whilst there is much to be commended in these positions, I will argue that they miss some key elements in the legal arguments around the use of force. Vitally, the various interventions have to be counterposed to the 1990-91 Gulf War, where intervention in the ‘peripheries’ was enabled through the fairly uncontroversial (legally) authorisation of the Security Council. The legal argument on humanitarian intervention and the war on terror only emerged as a reaction to the fear that China, Russia and (at various points) ‘Old Europe’ would block Security Council resolutions authorising the use of force. Consequently, the ‘racial’ discourse around armed intervention cannot simply be read as ‘othering’ the peripheries, but was also a key response to a re-emerging inter-imperialist rivalry. I argue that the ‘racialised’ discourse of humanitarian intervention and the war on terror needs to be seen as an attempt to legally entrench a hegemonic coalition against these emerging imperialist rivalries, whilst also articulating the ability of this coalition to intervene freely across the globe. I argue that this particular understanding has implications for the way in which we understand the role of race and racialised discourse in international law. What the above account suggests is that rather than granting racial otherness a foundational role in our understanding, we have to examine the concrete material circumstances which produce and construct particular racial configurations. Drawing on a range of Marxist and materialist thinkers on race, I will tentatively advance a non-reductionist, materialist account of the place of racial argument in international law, locating it with capitalist social relations and the specific conjunctural moments thrown up by them.

 

Rob Knox is a PhD candidate in Law at the London School of Economics. His thesis explores the concept(s) of imperialism in Marxist and Third World approaches to international law. He is member of the Editorial Board of the journal Historical Materialism: Research in Critical Marxist Theory.

 

This event is part of the Historical Materialism and International Relations seminar series.

Thu 09 February 2012, 20:15

'Václav Havel: Playwright, Dissident, Velvet Revolutionary and President'

Speaker: (Various)

Venue:Nissan Lecture Theatre, St. Antony's College

On Thursday 9 February at 8.15 pm in the Nissan Lecture Theatre, St Antony’s College, Oxford, chaired by Dr. Alex Pravda.

Professor Timothy Garton Ash, St Antony’s College
Professor Adam Roberts, Balliol College & British Academy
H.E. Michael Zantovsky, Ambassador Czech Republic

Organized jointly by the Oxford University Project on Civil Resistance and Power Politics; and the European Studies Centre, and the Russian & Eurasian Studies Centre, St Antony’s College.

Tue 07 February 2012, 17:00

Title tbc

Speaker: Sir Geoffrey Nice, former Prosecutor at the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia

Venue:St Cross Building, Oxford University

This seminar will take place from 5-6.30 pm in the Department of Politics and International Relations. Convenor: Professor Richard Caplan.

UPDATE: Please note that this event has now been cancelled.

This event is part of the Post-Conflict State Building: Practitioners' Perspectives seminar series.

Mon 06 February 2012, 17:00

‘Roy Jenkins’ papers’

Speaker: John Campbell

Venue:Pitt Rivers Museum Lecture Room

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF THE BOOK, BODLEIAN LIBRARY, OXFORD

Bodleian Masterclasses: Authorship, memory and manuscripts: political biography and historical resources

Co-Chaired by Professor Martin Ceadel (New College), and Professor Anne Deighton (Wolfson College)

Convenor, Helen Langley, curator of modern political papers, Bodleian Library

 

This year’s four seminars in the Modern Political Manuscripts series, held fortnightly during Hilary Term, explore the ways in which historians approach the writing of political biography, and how private papers become historical resources. The first two speakers will introduce documents from the Bodleian’s modern political manuscript collections before outlining the significance to their research and more generally. The second two speakers will describe archives ‘in transition’.

All welcome; please register in advance by emailing bookcentre@bodleian.ox.ac.uk  stating the dates you wish to attend.

Fri 03 February 2012, 13:00

The Garrison State From an Institutional Perspective: Was Lasswell Right?

Speaker: David Sylvan, Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies

Venue:Manor Road Building, Seminar Room G

It has become a commonplace that the events of 11 September have led to, or accelerated, general tendencies toward increasing aggrandizement of the U.S. executive branch to the point where Harold Lasswell's "garrison state" may in fact be coming into existence. To assess this claim is difficult, not least because of data problems. An institutional perspective, with its concomitant focus on organizational development, provides a promising alternative to seeing whether Lasswell was right.

David Sylvan is professor of international relations at the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies in Geneva and is an associate member at Nuffield for the academic year and a visitor this term. He is the coauthor of U.S. Foreign Policy in Perspective: Clients, Enemies, and Empire

This seminar is open to all and no registration is required. A light sandwich lunch will be served.

Update: a recording of the event be heard here, and slides from the presentation may be downloaded here (pdf).

Thu 02 February 2012, 17:00

'Marxism in IR and the challenge of Realism'

Speaker: Andrew Davenport

Venue:Manor Road Building, Seminar Room C

The Historical Materialism and International Relations seminar series seeks to explore and develop the multiple points of contact between Marxist theory and international relations, most broadly defined. It does so with the double aim of investigating the critical and explanatory potentials of Marxism in the domain of international relations, as well as to probe what an engagement with ‘the international’ might contribute to Marxist theory. The seminar series is associated with the journal of Historical Materialism: Research in Critical Marxist Theory and its forthcoming ‘Historical Materialism and International Relations’ book series.

The seminars will be given at 5 pm on Thursdays in Seminar Room C, Department of Politics and International Relations. Convener: Alexander Anievas.

Behind the recent discussions within Marxist IR theory concerning political multiplicity and uneven and combined development lies the larger, still unresolved, question of Marxism’s relation to Realism. Marxism in IR has never sufficiently recognized the seriousness of the challenge that the Realist conceptions of the intrinsic nature of the political and, therefore, of the international present to any Marxist ambition of human freedom. A review of the major approaches within IR Marxism shows that the question of the political remains a theoretical blind-spot. Hence, they cannot convincingly grasp geopolitics and the international without falling prey to Realist essentializing. This theoretical deficit within IR Marxism is traceable back to the ambivalence of Marx’s own thinking concerning revolutionary social change. If it is to escape the Realist fate, Marxism in IR must engage with the central categories of political thought to produce a critical theory of the political.

Andrew Davenport is a DPhil candidate in the Department of International Relations at the University of Sussex. His research focuses on rethinking the materialist critique of Realism in IR.

This event is part of the Historical Materialism and International Relations seminar series.

Thu 26 January 2012, 17:00

'The Political Economy of Reconstituted Neoliberalism: Reflections on Bolivia and Latin American Neostructuralism'

Speaker: Jeff Webber

Venue:Manor Road Building, Seminar Room C

 The Historical Materialism and International Relations seminar series seeks to explore and develop the multiple points of contact between Marxist theory and international relations, most broadly defined. It does so with the double aim of investigating the critical and explanatory potentials of Marxism in the domain of international relations, as well as to probe what an engagement with ‘the international’ might contribute to Marxist theory. The seminar series is associated with the journal of Historical Materialism: Research in Critical Marxist Theory and its forthcoming ‘Historical Materialism and International Relations’ book series.

The seminars will be given at 5 pm on Thursdays in Seminar Room C, Department of Politics and International Relations. Convener: Alexander Anievas.

Bolivia witnessed a left-indigenous insurrectionary cycle between 2000 and 2005 that overthrew two neoliberal presidents and laid the foundation for Evo Morales’ successful bid to become the country’s first indigenous head of state in 2006. Building on the theoretical traditions of revolutionary Marxism and indigenous liberation, Jeffery R. Webber provides an analytical framework for understanding the fine-grained sociological and political nuances of twenty-first century Bolivian class-struggle, state-repression, and indigenous resistance, as well as the deeply historical roots of today’s oppositional traditions. Drawing on extensive ethnographic fieldwork, including more than 80 in-depth interviews with social-movement and trade-union activists, Webber situates Bolivian developments within the wider Latin American turn to the left over the last decade. He pays particular attention to what he sees as the disjuncture between the revolutionary politics of left-indigenous movements in the 2000-2005 period, and the modest reformism of the Morales government over the course of its first term in office (2006-2010). Having described the ideological currents that are most alive in Bolivian politics and formal intellectual life under Evo Morales, the focus then shifts to political economy. The purpose here is to demonstrate why the development model implemented by the Morales administration over the entire four years of its first administration is best characterized as reconstituted neoliberalism. In order to understand the constituent parts of reconstituted neoliberalism, the paper first navigates through an extended, historical treatment of the declining legitimacy of neoliberalism globally, and the principal schools of thought and development practice in Latin America over the twentieth century, paying particular attention to structuralism, neoliberalism, and neostructuralism. Out of this we arrive at reconstituted neoliberalism in the present, and the way in which it has taken on a particular form in the Bolivian case.

Jeffery R. Webber is a Lecturer in the School of Politics and International Relations at Queen Mary, University of London. He splits his time between Europe, Canada and various countries in Latin America, where he conducts field research annually. He is the author of Red October: Left-Indigenous Struggles in Modern Bolivia (2011), and a member of the editorial collectives of Historical Materialism and Latin American Perspectives.

This event is part of the Historical Materialism and International Relations seminar series.

Tue 24 January 2012, 17:00

'Lessons from the field -- and why they are rarely learned'

Speaker: Mr Iain King, Governance Advisor to the UK Stabilisation Unit

Venue:Manor Road Building, Seminar Room E

 This seminar will take place from 5-6.30 pm in the Department of Politics and International Relations (Seminar Room E). Convenor: Professor Richard Caplan.

Please note that seating is limited, so early attendance is advised.

This event is part of the Post-Conflict State Building: Practitioners' Perspectives seminar series.

Tue 24 January 2012, 17:00

‘The documentary spoor of Clement Attlee’

Speaker: Lord (Peter) Hennessy

Venue:Convocation House, Bodleian Library

Venue: Convocation House, Bodleian Library
A Joint seminar with The Attlee Foundation. Please note change of day and venue for this session

 

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF THE BOOK, BODLEIAN LIBRARY, OXFORD

Bodleian Masterclasses: Authorship, memory and manuscripts: political biography and historical resources

Co-Chaired by Professor Martin Ceadel (New College), and Professor Anne Deighton (Wolfson College). Convenor: Helen Langley, curator of modern political papers, Bodleian Library

 

This year’s four seminars in the Modern Political Manuscripts series, held fortnightly during Hilary Term, explore the ways in which historians approach the writing of political biography, and how private papers become historical resources. The first two speakers will introduce documents from the Bodleian’s modern political manuscript collections before outlining the significance to their research and more generally. The second two speakers will describe archives ‘in transition’.

All welcome; please register in advance by emailing bookcentre@bodleian.ox.ac.uk  stating the dates you wish to attend.

Mon 23 January 2012, 18:00

'Behind the Arab Awakening: Dynamics of Civil Resistance'

Speaker: Professor Mary King (Rothermere American Institute, University of Oxford)

Venue:Green Templeton College

 On Monday 23 January at 6 pm at Green Templeton College, Oxford.

Seating for Professor King’s lecture is on a first come first served basis. Entry cannot be guaranteed.

Thu 19 January 2012, 17:00

'Civilization and the Poetics of Slavery'

Speaker: Robbie Shilliam

Venue:Manor Road Building, Seminar Room C

The Historical Materialism and International Relations seminar series seeks to explore and develop the multiple points of contact between Marxist theory and international relations, most broadly defined. It does so with the double aim of investigating the critical and explanatory potentials of Marxism in the domain of international relations, as well as to probe what an engagement with ‘the international’ might contribute to Marxist theory. The seminar series is associated with the journal of Historical Materialism: Research in Critical Marxist Theory and its forthcoming ‘Historical Materialism and International Relations’ book series.


The seminars will be given at 5 pm on Thursdays in Seminar Room C, Department of Politics and International Relations. Convener: Alexander Anievas.


‘Civilization and the Poetics of Slavery’:

Civilizational analysis is increasingly being used to capture the plurality of routes to and through the modern world order. However, the concept of civilization betrays a colonial legacy, namely, a denial that colonized peoples possessed the creative ability to cultivate their own subjecthoods. This denial was especially acute when it came to enslaved Africans in the New World whose bodies were imagined to be deracinated and deculturated. This article proposes that civilizational analysis has yet to fully address this legacy and, to clarify the stakes at play, compares and contrasts the historical sociology of CLR James with the mytho-poetics of Derek Walcott. Both authors, in different ways, have attempted to endow that quintessentially non-civilizable body - the New World slave – with subjecthood. From this discussion, the article makes the case for developing a “poetics of slavery” that could help to address the colonial strictures still residual in the concept of civilization. 

Robbie Shilliam is Senior Lecturer in International Relations at Queen Mary, University of London. He is author of German Thought and International Relations (Palgrave, 2009) and editor of International Relations and Non-Western Thought (Routledge, 2010).

This event is part of the Historical Materialism and International Relations seminar series.

Tue 29 November 2011, 17:15

'Do Arab revolutions demand international intervention?'

Speaker: Ambassador Sir John Jenkins, Her Majesty’s Ambassador to Libya, and former Ambassador to Iraq

Venue:Manor Road Building, Seminar Room A

The Changing Character of War Programme and the Centre for International Studies

 Emma Sky (Visiting Fellow of the Changing Character of War Programme) will host a series of seminars at 5.15pm on each Tuesday of Michaelmas Term in Seminar Room A (Department of Politics & International Relations) on: "Post 9/11 Interventions: National Security or Imperial Hubris?"

Seminar Series Outline

This event is part of the Emma Sky's Seminar Series seminar series.

Thu 24 November 2011, 20:00

Margaret Thatcher: Warrior, Icon - Historian?

Speaker: Dr Robert Saunders

Venue:Lady Margaret Hall

'On Thursday 24 November; LMH History Society; 8pm, Old Library, Lady Margaret Hall:

Dr Robert Saunders (St John's), "Margaret Thatcher: Warrior, Icon - Historian?"


More than any other politician in modern history, Margaret Thatcher captured the imagination of her age. No other prime minister has so divided opinion, or roused such strong emotions of hatred and veneration. Charles Moore calls her 'the greatest living Englishwoman'; Spitting Image represented her as a deranged psychopath who took advice from Adolf Hitler. Her legacy was fought over, not just in books and articles, but in plays, TV shows and pop songs. Elvis Costello, Morrissey, Elton John, the Notsensibles and a host of others wrote songs about her; and she has been played on screen by Meryl Streep, Andrea Riseborough and Lindsay Duncan. No other politician has made such an impression on popular culture or left such a mark upon the pop charts. This talk explores the relationship between Margaret Thatcher and her times, and looks particularly at her success as a historian. It shows how she shaped a particular memory of British history, that discredited her opponents and legitimised her own political agenda. In so doing, it takes a new approach to the Thatcher phenomenon and sheds light on the wider relationship between history and politics.


Robert Saunders teaches modern British history and politics at St John's College, Oxford. His book, edited with Ben Jackson, Making Thatcher's Britain, is published next year.

Tue 22 November 2011, 17:15

'Iraq and Iran – a Turkish perspective'

Speaker: Ambassador Murat Ozcelik, Turkish Ambassador to Iraq.

Venue:Manor Road Building, Seminar Room A

The Changing Character of War Programme and the Centre for International Studies

 Emma Sky (Visiting Fellow of the Changing Character of War Programme) will host a series of seminars at 5.15pm on each Tuesday of Michaelmas Term in Seminar Room A (Department of Politics & International Relations) on: "Post 9/11 Interventions: National Security or Imperial Hubris?"

Seminar Series Outline

**Please note this event has now been cancelled. Our apologies for any inconvenience caused.**

This event is part of the Emma Sky's Seminar Series seminar series.

Wed 16 November 2011, 17:00

Sir Patrick Nairne Lecture 2011: 'The Future of Intervention and Nation-Building: lessons from costly failures and modest successes'

Speaker: Ambassador Peter Galbraith

Venue:Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, St Catherine's

This exciting lecture, addressing one of the most contentious issues in contemporary foreign policy, will take place at 5pm. Booking is essential. To book a place, please contact the Master's Office on 01865 271762 or email megan.parry@stcatz.ox.ac.uk.

Since the end of the Cold War, the US and UK have participated in at least five major military interventions: Bosnia, Kosovo, Afghanistan, Iraq and Libya. Of these, operations in Iraq and Afghanistan have, Ambassador Galbraith argues, proven protracted, expensive and largely unsuccessful efforts at nation building. The US alone has spent upwards of $1.5 trillion in the two countries since 2001 and suffered more than 500 casualties.Ambassador Galbraith will analyse the future of military intervention and efforts at nation building in light of these key interventions. Massively overestimating their capabilities, Galbraith argues that the US and allies invest vast sums into nation-building attempts which simply cannot be accomplished. While accepting the need for humanitarian interventions to save civilian populations, he argues that the West should be more selective as to where to intervene and modest in what it attempts to achieve.

About Ambassador Galbraith (1973, PPE)

Ambassador Peter Galbraith served as US Ambassador to Croatia (1993-98) and participated in negotiations which led to the end of the war in Bosnia in 1995. He was the mediator and principal architect of the 1995 Erdut Agreement that ended the war in Croatia. In 2000 and 2001, he was both a senior UN official and Cabinet Minister in the interim government that prepared East Timor for independence. The author of the best-selling, The End of Iraq: How American Incompetence Created a War Without End, he was the UN Secretary-General’s Deputy Special Representative in Afghanistan.

Tue 15 November 2011, 17:00

'The Deaths of Others: The Fate of Civilians in America's Wars'

Speaker: Professor John Tirman (Center for International Studies, MIT)

Venue:Manor Road Building, Seminar Room E

Professor John Tirman, Executive Director of MIT's Center for International Studies, will deliver a lecture from 5 p.m. to 6.30 p.m. on Tuesday, 15 November, in Seminar Room E at the Department of Politics and International Relations.

Tue 15 November 2011, 17:15

'Intelligence and the Global War on Terror'

Speaker: Chief Constable Richard Thompson

Venue:Manor Road Building, Seminar Room A

The Changing Character of War Programme and the Centre for International Studies

 Emma Sky (Visiting Fellow of the Changing Character of War Programme) will host a series of seminars at 5.15pm on each Tuesday of Michaelmas Term in Seminar Room A (Department of Politics & International Relations) on: "Post 9/11 Interventions: National Security or Imperial Hubris?"

Seminar Series Outline

This event is part of the Emma Sky's Seminar Series seminar series.

Mon 14 November 2011, 18:00

'Humanitarianism in the 21st Century'

Speaker: Sir John Holmes (Ditchley Foundation)

Venue:Oakeshott Room, Lincoln College

Monday 14th November 2011 (6th Week), 6pm (doors open 5.45pm)

**please note the changed venue: this event will now take place in the Oakeshott Room, Lincoln College**

Sir John Holmes was the UN's Under-Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs and Emergency Relief from 2007 - 2010 and before then was the British Ambassador to Portugal and then France.

He is now the Director of the Ditchley Foundation, who bring together experts from across the world and across disciplines to discuss international affairs.

He will be speaking on the subject of "Humanitarianism in the 21st Century"

The Oxford University United Nations Association promotes the aims of the UN and discussion of world affairs through speakers, Model United Nations Conferences and more.

For more information on this event or the society in general please email Sam Willis on president@ouuna.co.uk.

Contact Sam Willis

Wed 09 November 2011, 17:00

'Politics after Civil Resistance: Report on the Tunisian Elections'

Speaker: Dr Michael Willis (St Antony’s College)

Venue:Manor Road Building, Seminar Room A

On Wednesday 9 November at 5.00–6.30 p.m. in Seminar Room A at the Manor Road Building, Oxford, chaired by Professor Adam Roberts.

Dr Michael Willis, H.M. King Mohammed VI Fellow in Moroccan and Mediterranean Studies at St Antony’s College. His research interests focus on the politics, modern history and international relations of the Maghreb. He is author of The Islamist Challenge in Algeria: A Political History and is currently writing a book on the comparative politics of Algeria, Tunisia and Morocco.

 

A Centre for International Studies Special Lecture, under the auspices of the Oxford University Project on Civil Resistance and Power Politics. There will be a drinks reception afterwards.

Tue 08 November 2011, 17:15

'The Utility of Force'

Speaker: Lt. General Sir Paul Newton, Commander Force Development and Training

Venue:Manor Road Building, Seminar Room A

The Changing Character of War Programme and the Centre for International Studies

 Emma Sky (Visiting Fellow of the Changing Character of War Programme) will host a series of seminars at 5.15pm on each Tuesday of Michaelmas Term in Seminar Room A (Department of Politics & International Relations) on: "Post 9/11 Interventions: National Security or Imperial Hubris?"

Seminar Series Outline

This event is part of the Emma Sky's Seminar Series seminar series.

Tue 01 November 2011, 17:15

'Fragile States – can we fix them?'

Speaker: Lindy Cameron, Department for International Development, former head of office in Iraq and Afghanistan

Venue:Manor Road Building, Seminar Room A

The Changing Character of War Programme and the Centre for International Studies

 Emma Sky (Visiting Fellow of the Changing Character of War Programme) will host a series of seminars at 5.15pm on each Tuesday of Michaelmas Term in Seminar Room A (Department of Politics & International Relations) on: "Post 9/11 Interventions: National Security or Imperial Hubris?"

Seminar Series Outline

This event is part of the Emma Sky's Seminar Series seminar series.

Thu 27 October 2011, 17:00

'Environmental Conflict and its Resolution'

Speaker: (Various)

Venue:St John's College

An open joint seminar on 'Environmental Conflict & its Resolution' at 5pm in the Garden Quad Auditorium, St John's College:

'Ethnic violence, water scarcity and managing resources to promote peace’ (Karen Witsenburg, Both ENDS and Max Plank Institute for Anthropology)

'Climate Change and Conflict in Sudan: what if development is not the answer to save Darfur?' (Harry Verhoeven, Politics & IR, Oxford)

'The Ecology of Conflict: Human-­Wildlife Conflict on the Hwange National Park Boundary, Zimbabwe' (Andrew Loveridge, Wildlife Conservation Research Unit, Zoology)

A joint event open to all hosted by the African Studies Centre, OXPEACE & Institute of Human Sciences

The Seminar will be followed by drinks. All welcome.


Tue 25 October 2011, 17:15

'Talking with terrorists'

Speaker: Lt. General Sir Graeme Lamb

Venue:Manor Road Building, Seminar Room A

The Changing Character of War Programme and the Centre for International Studies

 Emma Sky (Visiting Fellow of the Changing Character of War Programme) will host a series of seminars at 5.15pm on each Tuesday of Michaelmas Term in Seminar Room A (Department of Politics & International Relations) on: "Post 9/11 Interventions: National Security or Imperial Hubris?"

 

Seminar Series Outline

 

This event is part of the Emma Sky's Seminar Series seminar series.

Tue 18 October 2011, 17:00

'Civil Resistance: An Under-investigated Phenomenon in International Relations' - CIS Special Lecture

Speaker: Dr Erica Chenoweth (Wesleyan University)

Venue:Lecture Theatre, Manor Road Building

On Tuesday 18 October 2011, at 5.00–6.30 p.m. in the Lecture Theatre at the Department of Politics and International Relations, Manor Road Building, Oxford, chaired by Professor Adam Roberts.

Dr Erica Chenoweth, Assistant Professor of Government at Wesleyan University. She directs Wesleyan’s Program on Terrorism and Insurgency Research. Her latest book is (with Maria Stephan), Why Civil Resistance Works: The Strategic Logic of Nonviolent Conflict, Columbia University Press, August 2011. This is partly based on the authors’ article ‘Why Civil Resistance Works: The Strategic Logic of Nonviolent Conflict’, International Security, vol. 33, no. 1 (Summer 2008), pp. 7–44.

Civil Resistance: An Under-investigated Phenomenon in International Relations
with a response by Professor Andrew Hurrell.

 

This event will be followed by a drinks reception.

Fri 14 October 2011, 12:30

Panel Discussion and Book Launch: 'Citizens, Culture & State Sovereignty: What Future for the Responsibility to Protect?'

Speaker: (Various)

Venue:Seminar Room B, Manor Road Building


Invitation to a Public Discussion And Book Launch for Responsibility to Protect: Cultural Perspectives in the Global South


Convened by: Centre for International Studies & Centre for Ethics and Law in Armed Conflict

FRIDAY 14 OCTOBER 2011, 12.30-2pm


Seminar Room B, Department of Politics and International Relations, Manor Road Building

(light buffet lunch beforehand from 12.00-12.30pm in the Common Room)

 

SPEAKERS

Dr. Rama Mani with Professor Jennifer Welsh, Professor Richard Caplan and Professor Kalypso Nicolaïdis

 

 Further Details

 

Background: NATO’s military intervention in Libya alongside the UN’s inaction in Syria raise tough questions about the controversial norm of the Responsibility to Protect (R2P), adopted by the United Nations World Summit in 2005. The ‘Arab Spring’ has demonstrated that citizens can reshape state sovereignty and effect ‘regime change’: sometimes alone and unaided, and sometimes with major international diplomatic or military intervention. It showed that international strategic security decisions can be prompted by entreaties for protection from ordinary civilians, and influenced by their cultural sensitivities. And yet, it also revealed that UN member states may still fail to prevent avoidable human carnage, and reject their responsibility to protect threatened civilians– in order to protect their national or vested interests, instead. What future then for R2P, and for the prevention of future genocides?

 

Dr. Mani will introduce and launch Responsibility to Protect: Cultural Perspectives from the Global South, (Routledge, Sept. 2011, co-edited by Mani and Prof. Thomas G. Weiss). She will argue why it is crucial today for the UN, NATO and EU to consider both cultural dimensions of ethics, values, spirituality and aesthetics, as well as civilians’ needs, demands and sensitivities in shaping future R2P responses, drawing on local voices from Rwanda, Kosovo, Nepal and elsewhere.

Professor Welsh will provide a normative critique: do culture and civil society count in politics? Can culture help shape R2P preventive strategies, in light of recent interventions & non-interventions?

Professor Caplan will respond from a peace operations perspective: drawing on the turbulent experiences of Kosovo and Afghanistan, what can culture teach us about shaping more appropriate international interventions and exit strategies that don’t do more harm than good?

Professor Nicolaïdis will chair and conclude the session, providing an EU perspective, as the EU gets more involved in peace operations and R2P interventions.

Mon 10 October 2011

TBC

Speaker: Mr Alan Doss

A lecture will be given by Mr Alan Doss (former Special Representative of the UN Secretary-General for Liberia).

More details to follow

Mon 10 October 2011, 17:00

'The Egyptian Revolution of 2011: Civil Resistance and Power Politics' - CIS Special Lecture

Speaker: Professor Khaled Fahmy

Venue:Lecture Theatre, Manor Road Building

On Monday 10 October 2011, at 5.00–6.30 p.m. in the Lecture Theatre at the Department of Politics and International Relations, Manor Road Building, Oxford, chaired by Professor Timothy Garton Ash.

Professor Khaled Fahmy, leading Egyptian historian and author of All the Pasha’s Men: Mehmed Ali, his Army, and the Making of Modern Egypt (Cambridge Univ. Press, 1997)

The Egyptian Revolution of 2011: Civil Resistance and Power Politics
with responses by Professor Eugene Rogan and Professor Adam Roberts. (On the following day at 6.00 pm Professor Fahmy will speak on this topic at the British Academy in London.)

** UPDATE: Prof. Fahmy has had to postpone this visit to the UK owing to circumstances beyond his control. We hope to rearrange this event at a later date **

Fri 17 June 2011

'Operationalizing the Responsibility to Prevent'

Speaker: Monica Serrano, Serena Sharma, Jennifer Welsh, Edward Luck, Norul Rashid, Ekkehard Strauss, Eileen Babbitt, George Lopez, Martin Mennecke, Jake Sherman and Andrea Bartoli

A workshop in New York co-hosted by the Global Centre for the Responsibility to Protect, the Oxford Institute for Ethics, Law, and Armed Conflict and the Centre for International Studies, Oxford.

Further details of the programme can be found here.

Thu 16 June 2011 to Fri 17 June 2011, 17:00

'The Politics of Accommodation in Multinational Democracies'

Speaker: Brendan O’Leary, Montserrat Guibernau, Xavier Arbós, José María Sauca, Enric Martínez, Jaime Lluch, François Rocher, Stephen Tierney, Francesco Palermo, André Fazi and Héctor Luis Acevedo

Venue:European Studies Centre

Convenor: Dr. Jaime Lluch, Santander Fellow, St Antony’s College, Oxford

The 2011 Santander Visiting Fellowship Conference will be held in the Seminar Room of the European Studies Centre, 70 Woodstock Road, Oxford, on Thursday 16th June and Friday 17th June

The event programme can be found here.

Further details from anne-laure.guillermain@sant.ox.ac.uk or www.sant.ox.ac.uk/esc

Fri 10 June 2011, 09:20

'Workshop on the Role of Status in International Relations'

Speaker: (Various)

Venue:SCR, Nuffield College

On Friday, 10th June 2011, 9.20 a.m. to 12.45 p.m. at the Senior Common Room, Nuffield College, Oxford.

All Welcome

For further details and information on speakers please refer to the workshop programme.

Update: if you wish to attend, please contact Robin Markwica as soon as possible. Papers will be pre-circulated. 

Thu 19 May 2011, 17:00

'Economics, Business Development and Metrics: The Global Peace Index' - OPHI and OxPeace Special Lecture:

Speaker: Steve Killelea

Venue:Queen Elizabeth House, 3 Mansfield Road, Oxford OX1 3TB

Oxford lecture by Steve Killelea

Steve Killelea is an Australian entrepreneur, philanthropist and founder of The Global Peace Index and the Institute for Economics and Peace. At this special lecture, co-hosted by OPHI and Oxford Network of Peace Studies (OxPeace), he will discuss The Global Peace Index which aims to measure the peacefulness of countries and identify drivers of peace. He will also outline the role he envisages for the business community in creating peaceful societies. Developed in conjunction with the Economist Intelligence Unit, the index looks at internal factors such as levels of violence and crime within a country and factors in a country's external relations such as military expenditure and wars. All welcome.

Location: Thursday 19th May, 5pm, Seminar Room 3, Oxford Department of International Development, Queen Elizabeth House, 3 Mansfield Road, Oxford, OX1 3TB

Venue information: http://www.qeh.ox.ac.uk/ For more information about The Global Peace Index visit the Economics and Peace website. (http://www.economicsandpeace.org/WhatWeDo/GPI)

Sat 07 May 2011, 09:30

OxPeace day-conference on ‘Media in Conflict and Peacebuilding’

Speaker: (Various)

Venue:St John's College

Saturday 7 May 2011 in the Auditorium, St John's College.

Final programme and speaker list

The programme starts at 10am, registration opens 09.30, please arrive in time for the start.

To register, please email therese.feiler@exeter.ox.ac.uk. It should still be possible to walk in on the day, but please register beforehand if at all possible.

The Auditorium is a four-minute walk from the entrance of St John's on St Giles. Conference packs will be handed out at the venue and coffee will be available.

Thu 05 May 2011, 15:00

Symposium on 'Major Powers and International Responsibilities'

Speaker: Professor Joseph Nye, Professor Sir Adam Roberts, Brazilian Ambassador H.E. Roberto Jaguaribe, Dr Amrita Narlikar, Dr Evelyn Goh, plus other speakers to be announced.

Venue:Lecture Theatre, Manor Road Building

This symposium features Professor Joseph Nye, Professor Sir Adam Roberts, Brazilian Ambassador H.E. Roberto Jaguaribe, Dr Amrita Narlikar, Dr Evelyn Goh, plus other speakers to be announced.

Location: Lecture Theatre, Department of Politics and International Relations, Manor Road Building

Time: 3pm to 6.30pm. 

All are welcome

Jointly organised by the Oxford Fulbright Institute and the Project on UN Governance and Reform of the Centre for International Studies.

Wed 04 May 2011, 17:00

'Conceptual Roots of Failure in Afghanistan'

Speaker: Whit Mason

Venue:Manor Road Building, Seminar Room B

Seminar with Whit Mason, Former UN justice coordinator for southern Afghanistan and editor of 'The Rule of Law in Afghanistan: Missing in Inaction' (Cambridge University Press)

Location: Seminar Room B, Department of Politics and International Relations, Manor Road Building

Time: 5pm to 6.30pm

Tue 01 March 2011, 14:00

'Negotiating the Non-negotiable: Protecting Human Rights in Trade Agreements'

Speaker: Professor Gillian Moon (New South Wales), Professor Frank J. Garcia (Boston College Law School)

Venue:European Studies Centre

This event is part of the Global Trade Ethics Project, Centre for International Studies, Department for Politics and International Relations http://cis.politics.ox.ac.uk/research/Projects/globaltradeethics.asp

For advance copies of the presentations, please email geg@univ.ox.ac.uk

 

Gillian Moon

Senior Lecturer, Faculty of Law, University of New South Wales & Visiting Academic at Global Economic Governance Programme, will present on ‘WTO Law and Discrimination against Minorities and Women in Developing Countries’

 

Frank J. Garcia

Professor and Law School Fund Scholar, Boston College Law School, USA, will present his latest work ‘Three Takes on Trade and Justice’

 

Chair: Kalypso Nicolaidis, Professor of International Relations

Discussant: Emily Jones, Coordinator, Global Trade Ethics Project

 

Thu 24 February 2011, 17:00

'Norms and UN Peacekeeping Coalitions: the case of Cyprus'

Speaker: Dr Katharina Coleman, University of British Columbia

Venue:Manor Road Building, Seminar Room D

Thursday, 24 February 2011, 5-6:30pm

 

Speaker: Dr Katharina Coleman, University of British Columbia

Venue: Seminar Room D, Manor Road Building

All are welcome

 

Wed 16 February 2011, 16:00

Economic Implications of Political Succession in North Korea: Are the Markets Afraid of Kim Jong-Il?

Speaker: Professor Byung-Yeon Kim, Seoul National University

Venue:Lecture Theatre, Manor Road Building

University of Oxford

Hilary Term 2011

 

Seminar Presentation by Prof. Byung-Yeon Kim,

Seoul National University

All are welcome


Speaker: Prof. Byung-Yeon Kim, Seoul National University

Chair: Dr. Christopher Davis, University of Oxford, Department of Economics

Venue: Lecture Theatre, Manor Road Building

Prof. Kim studied Economics as an undergraduate at Seoul National University and then was a postgraduate student in the Department of Economics at the University of Oxford. He wrote his D.Phil. dissertation on “Fiscal Policy and Consumer Market Disequilibrium in the Soviet Union, 1965-1989” under the supervision of Dr. Christopher Davis, Reader in Command and Transition Economies, who will be chairing both seminars on 16 February. Prof. Kim is an expert on the economy of North Korea and has been involved in research projects that have studied this command economy and its prospects. The SNU website of Prof. Kim can be found at: http://plaza.snu.ac.kr/~kimby/.

Dr. Davis has written on the second economy of the USSR and in 2010 presented two talks at conferences in Seoul on lessons to be learned from the experiences of economic transition in Russia and Eastern Europe for the study of the economy of North Korea and assessments of its possible future economic transition.

 

This event is jointly organized by the Centre for International Studies, Department of Economics and the School of Interdisciplinary Area Studies

Thu 02 December 2010, 17:00

'The Shanghai-Madrid Axis: Comparing British responses to the conflicts in China and Spain, 1936-1939'

Speaker: Dr. Ruth Harris (New College, Oxford)

Venue:History Faculty Building

'The Shanghai-Madrid Axis: Comparing British responses to the conflicts in China and Spain, 1936-1939'

Speaker: Ruth Harris (New College)

Modern European History Seminar - Michaelmas Term 2010

The seminar will take place at 5 p.m. on Thursdays in the History Faculty Building in George Street, Oxford. This is the former Old Boys School, opposite the main cinema. Access is at the rear of the building. The seminar is intended as a forum for all those working on Modern European History in Oxford. Everybody is very welcome to attend. Tea will be available in the Common Room from 4.30 p.m. prior to each seminar.

This event is part of the 'Great Causes' in Modern Europe seminar series.

Thu 02 December 2010 to Thu 02 December 2010, 17:00

'Why Nations Fight'

Speaker: Richard Ned Lebow

Venue:Manor Road Building, Seminar Room G

Thursday, 2 December 2010

5:00-6:30pm

At Seminar Room G, Manor Road Building

Title: 'Why Nations Fight'

Speaker: Richard Ned Lebow is James O. Freedman Presidential Professor at Dartmouth College and Centennial Professor at the London School of Economics and Political Science

Contact CIS co-ordinator

Tue 30 November 2010, 17:00

Taiwan Studies Programme Seminar

Venue:Dahrendorf Room, Founder’s Building at St Antony’s

All are welcome

Convenor: Professor Rosemary Foot

(This seminar series is financially supported by The Asian Studies Centre St Antony’s College, British Inter-Universities China Centre University of Oxford and the Centre for International Studies DPIR University of Oxford)

This event is part of the CIS Seminar: Border Crossings: Explaining China’s International Behaviour Through a Domestic Lens seminar series.

Further information: asian@sant.ox.ac.uk

This event is part of the Border Crossings: Explaining China’s International Behaviour Through a Domestic Lens seminar series.

Mon 29 November 2010 to Mon 29 November 2010, 17:00

A Life in the Palestine Liberation Organisation: Shafiq al-Hout

Speaker: Professor Bayan al-Hout, Dr. Karma Nabulsi, Professor Avi Shlaim, and Dr. Eugene Rogan

Venue:The Middle East Centre, St Antony's College, 68 Woodstock Road, Oxford

The Middle East Centre, the Department of Politics and International Relations, and the British Academy Teaching Contemporary Palestinian Political History Programme are pleased to invite you to -

‘A Life in the Palestine Liberation Organisation:

Shafiq al-Hout’

Panel discussion with Professor Bayan al-Hout, Dr. Karma Nabulsi, Professor Avi Shlaim, and Dr. Eugene Rogan

To coincide with the launch of the translation of the memoirs of Shafiq al-Hout (Pluto Press, 2010)

All welcome

Copies of the book will be available

 

Sat 27 November 2010 to Sun 28 November 2010

Teaching Contemporary Palestinian Political History

This workshop is funded by the British Academy UK-Middle East Capacity Sharing Partnership. The event sees the launch of the second year of a three year research collaboration.

Project details

Contact Kate Candy

Thu 25 November 2010, 17:00

'Better active today than radioactive tomorrow: Transnational protest against Nuclear Power in France and West Germany, 1968-1981'

Speaker: Dr. Ruth Harris (New College, Oxford)

Venue:History Faculty Building

'Better active today than radioactive tomorrow: Transnational protest against Nuclear Power in France and West Germany, 1968-1981'

Speaker: Ruth Harris (New College)

Modern European History Seminar - Michaelmas Term 2010

The seminar will take place at 5 p.m. on Thursdays in the History Faculty Building in George Street, Oxford. This is the former Old Boys School, opposite the main cinema. Access is at the rear of the building. The seminar is intended as a forum for all those working on Modern European History in Oxford. Everybody is very welcome to attend. Tea will be available in the Common Room from 4.30 p.m. prior to each seminar.

This event is part of the 'Great Causes' in Modern Europe seminar series.

Tue 23 November 2010, 17:00

'Beginnings of French Resistance in the Occupied Zone (1940-1941)'

Speaker: Julien Blanc (Sciences Po, Lyon)

Venue:Mordan Hall, St Hugh's College

Lecture: “Beginnings of French Resistance in the Occupied Zone (1940-1941)”

5.00pm at Mordan Hall, St Hugh’s College, Oxford.

 

Lecture given by Julien Blanc, Sciences Po, Lyon.

Chair: Robert Gildea, Worcester College.

 

Julien Blanc is a specialist of the early days of the French Resistance during the Second World War. He is the author of Au commencement de la Résistance. Du côté du musée de l’homme, 1940-1941, published in October 2010 by Le Seuil Editions, Paris. His lecture will focus on a very well-known group of Resistance fighters called the « réseau du Musée de l’homme », insisting upon its variety, the important role women played in that group and its precocity, which explains why German occupation forces repressed it as early as 1941. Nonetheless, this story was not ended by the ferocious repression of the Nazis.

This event is part of the Border Crossings: Explaining China’s International Behaviour Through a Domestic Lens seminar series.

Tue 23 November 2010, 17:00

'Beginnings of French Resistance in the Occupied Zone (1940-1941)'

Speaker: Julien Blanc (Sciences Po, Lyon)

Venue:Mordan Hall, St Hugh's College

Lecture: “Beginnings of French Resistance in the Occupied Zone (1940-1941)”

5.00pm at Mordan Hall, St Hugh’s College, Oxford.

 

Lecture given by Julien Blanc, Sciences Po, Lyon.

Chair: Robert Gildea, Worcester College.

 

Julien Blanc is a specialist of the early days of the French Resistance during the Second World War. He is the author of Au commencement de la Résistance. Du côté du musée de l’homme, 1940-1941, published in October 2010 by Le Seuil Editions, Paris. His lecture will focus on a very well-known group of Resistance fighters called the « réseau du Musée de l’homme », insisting upon its variety, the important role women played in that group and its precocity, which explains why German occupation forces repressed it as early as 1941. Nonetheless, this story was not ended by the ferocious repression of the Nazis.

 

All welcome


For more information please see here.

Mon 22 November 2010, 17:00

'Arguing Global Governance: Agency, Lifeworld and Shared Reasoning'

Speaker: Dr. Corneliu Bjola (University of Toronto) and Dr. Markus Kornprobst (Oxford)

BOOK LAUNCH and PANEL DISCUSSION

Arguing Global Governance:

Agency, Lifeworld and Shared Reasoning

By Corneliu Bjola and Markus Kornprobst

 

Panel:

Alexander Betts, Department of Politics and IR, Oxford

Corneliu Bjola, Oxford Department of International Development

Rodney B. Hall, Oxford Department of International Development, Oxford

Markus Kornprobst, Vienna School of International Studies

 

The book broadens existing perspectives on argumentation in order to address the question of how global governance can and ought to effectively address serious global problems, such as financial instability, military conflicts, distributive justice, and increasing concerns of ecological disasters.

 

All are welcome, and wine and nibbles will be served afterwards. For further information, please contact  Ms. Denise Watt (01865 2 81803).

Monday, 22 November 2010, 5 pm at Queen Elizabeth House, Seminar Room 1

(3 Mansfield Road, Oxford OX1 3TB)

Thu 18 November 2010, 12:30

'The Treaty-Making Revolution of the 19th Century'

Speaker: Dr. Edward Keene (Christ Church College, Oxford)

Venue:Manor Road Building, Seminar Room A

Speaker: Dr. Edward Keene (Oxford)

IR Research Colloquium - Michaelmas Term 2010

Thursdays 12.30pm - 2.15pm

Manor Road, Seminar Room A

(Sandwiches provided)

Convenors: Professor Andrew Hurrell and Ms Christine Cheng

The aim of the Colloquium is to provide a forum where faculty, students, post-docs and visitors can present their work; where the IR community can discuss shared theoretical and analytical issues; and where people with diverse theoretical approaches and commitments within IR can come together.

Format:  a paper will be pre-circulated to participants one week in advance; the author will give a 20 minute presentation speaking to the main arguments, followed by 15 minutes from a graduate student discussant, then open debate. Ideally, presenters will present on those parts of their research that raise general analytical or theoretical issues and/or connect with an IR audience outside of their immediate specialization. Those  interested in receiving the papers and attending the colloquium should contact Mrs Marga Lyall (marga.lyall@politics.ox.ac.uk).

This event is part of the IR Research Colloquium seminar series.

Contact Marga Lyall

Thu 18 November 2010, 17:00

'In the Shadow of a Massacre: French involvement in the campaign to free Mexican political prisoners from 1968'

Speaker: Sarah Stokes (Merton College, Oxford)

Venue:History Faculty Building

'In the Shadow of a Massacre: French involvement in the campaign to free Mexican political prisoners from 1968'

Speaker: Sarah Stokes (Merton College)

Modern European History Seminar - Michaelmas Term 2010

The seminar will take place at 5 p.m. on Thursdays in the History Faculty Building in George Street, Oxford. This is the former Old Boys School, opposite the main cinema. Access is at the rear of the building. The seminar is intended as a forum for all those working on Modern European History in Oxford. Everybody is very welcome to attend. Tea will be available in the Common Room from 4.30 p.m. prior to each seminar.

This event is part of the 'Great Causes' in Modern Europe seminar series.

Tue 16 November 2010, 17:00

'The Rise of Chinese Nationalism & Chinese Security Policy' - [NOTE: CHANGE OF VENUE]

Speaker: Robert S. Ross (Professor of Political Science, Boston College)

Venue:Nissan Lecture Theatre, St. Anthony’s College

Professor Robert S. Ross (Professor of Political Science, Boston College) The Rise of Chinese Nationalism & Chinese Security Policy: Implications for East Asia & US China Relations

Convenor: Professor Rosemary Foot

(This seminar series is financially supported by The Asian Studies Centre St Antony’s College, British Inter-Universities China Centre University of Oxford and the Centre for International Studies DPIR University of Oxford)

This event is part of the CIS Seminar: Border Crossings: Explaining China’s International Behaviour Through a Domestic Lens seminar series.

Further information: asian@sant.ox.ac.uk

This event is part of the Border Crossings: Explaining China’s International Behaviour Through a Domestic Lens seminar series.

Thu 11 November 2010, 17:00

‘Let Europe judge Europe' - Ruth Harris (New College)

Venue:History Faculty Building

'‘Let Europe judge Europe’: Conservative politics and the genesis of European Human Rights Law, 1945-5'

Speaker: Ruth Harris (New College)

Modern European History Seminar - Michaelmas Term 2010

The seminar will take place at 5 p.m. on Thursdays in the History Faculty Building in George Street, Oxford. This is the former Old Boys School, opposite the main cinema. Access is at the rear of the building. The seminar is intended as a forum for all those working on Modern European History in Oxford. Everybody is very welcome to attend. Tea will be available in the Common Room from 4.30 p.m. prior to each seminar.

This event is part of the 'Great Causes' in Modern Europe seminar series.

Tue 09 November 2010, 17:00

'Human Rights and Rule of Law: Norms without Borders' - Dr Gudrun Wacke (German Institute for International & Security Affairs)

Venue:Dahrendorf Room, Founder’s Building at St Antony’s

Dr Gudrun Wacke (German Institute for International & Security Affairs)

All are welcome

Convenor: Professor Rosemary Foot

(This seminar series is financially supported by The Asian Studies Centre St Antony’s College, British Inter-Universities China Centre University of Oxford and the Centre for International Studies DPIR University of Oxford)

This event is part of the CIS Seminar: Border Crossings: Explaining China’s International Behaviour Through a Domestic Lens seminar series.

Further information: asian@sant.ox.ac.uk

This event is part of the Border Crossings: Explaining China’s International Behaviour Through a Domestic Lens seminar series.

Tue 09 November 2010, 17:00

'Can the core of international society be morally justified?' - Dr Rita Floyd (Warwick)

Speaker: Dr Rita Floyd (Warwick)

Venue:Seminar Room B, Manor Road Building

This talk will be given by Dr Rita Floyd, British Academy Post-Doctoral Fellow (Warwick)

 

Tuesday 9th November 2010 from 5pm to 6.30pm: Seminar Room B, Manor Road Building

Thu 04 November 2010, 17:00

'Anti-slavery and the Congo Question in the history of Humanitarianism' - Vincent Viaene (Brasenose)

Venue:History Faculty Building

Speaker: Vincent Viaene (Brasenose College)

Modern European History Seminar - Michaelmas Term 2010

The seminar will take place at 5 p.m. on Thursdays in the History Faculty Building in George Street, Oxford. This is the former Old Boys School, opposite the main cinema. Access is at the rear of the building. The seminar is intended as a forum for all those working on Modern European History in Oxford. Everybody is very welcome to attend. Tea will be available in the Common Room from 4.30 p.m. prior to each seminar.

This event is part of the 'Great Causes' in Modern Europe seminar series.

Tue 02 November 2010, 17:00

The Case of the Currency Policy

Venue:Dahrendorf Room, Founder’s Building at St Antony’s

Dr Andrew Walter (Reader in International Political Economy LSE)

All are welcome

Convenor: Professor Rosemary Foot

(This seminar series is financially supported by The Asian Studies Centre St Antony’s College, British Inter-Universities China Centre University of Oxford and the Centre for International Studies DPIR University of Oxford)

This event is part of the CIS Seminar: Border Crossings: Explaining China’s International Behaviour Through a Domestic Lens seminar series.

Further information: asian@sant.ox.ac.uk

This event is part of the Border Crossings: Explaining China’s International Behaviour Through a Domestic Lens seminar series.

Thu 28 October 2010, 17:00

'The Last Battle of the Cold War: Peace Movements and German Politics during the 1980s'

Venue:History Faculty Building

Speaker: Holger Nehring (Sheffield)

Modern European History Seminar - Michaelmas Term 2010

The seminar will take place at 5 p.m. on Thursdays in the History Faculty Building in George Street, Oxford. This is the former Old Boys School, opposite the main cinema. Access is at the rear of the building. The seminar is intended as a forum for all those working on Modern European History in Oxford. Everybody is very welcome to attend. Tea will be available in the Common Room from 4.30 p.m. prior to each seminar.

This event is part of the 'Great Causes' in Modern Europe seminar series.

Tue 26 October 2010, 17:00

Immigrant China

Venue:Dahrendorf Room, Founder’s Building at St Antony’s

Immigrant China

Professor Frank Pieke (University of Leiden)

All are welcome

Convenor: Professor Rosemary Foot

(This seminar series is financially supported by The Asian Studies Centre St Antony’s College, British Inter-Universities China Centre University of Oxford and the Centre for International Studies DPIR University of Oxford)

This event is part of the CIS Seminar: Border Crossings: Explaining China’s International Behaviour Through a Domestic Lens seminar series.

Further information: asian@sant.ox.ac.uk

This event is part of the Border Crossings: Explaining China’s International Behaviour Through a Domestic Lens seminar series.

Thu 21 October 2010, 17:00

'The African panda. decolonisation and the origins of the World Wildlife Fund (WWF)'

Venue:History Faculty Building

Speaker: Alexis Schwarzenbach (Zurich)

Modern European History Seminar - Michaelmas Term 2010

The seminar will take place at 5 p.m. on Thursdays in the History Faculty Building in George Street, Oxford. This is the former Old Boys School, opposite the main cinema. Access is at the rear of the building. The seminar is intended as a forum for all those working on Modern European History in Oxford. Everybody is very welcome to attend. Tea will be available in the Common Room from 4.30 p.m. prior to each seminar.

This event is part of the 'Great Causes' in Modern Europe seminar series.

Tue 19 October 2010, 17:00

TBC

Venue:Dahrendorf Room, Founder’s Building at St Antony’s

Seminar: CIS Seminar: Border Crossings: Explaining China’s International Behaviour Through a Domestic Lens

TBC

All are welcome

Convenor: Professor Rosemary Foot

(This seminar series is financially supported by The Asian Studies Centre St Antony’s College, British Inter-Universities China Centre University of Oxford and the Centre for International Studies DPIR University of Oxford)

This event is part of the CIS Seminar: Border Crossings: Explaining China’s International Behaviour Through a Domestic Lens seminar series.

Further information: asian@sant.ox.ac.uk

This event is part of the Border Crossings: Explaining China’s International Behaviour Through a Domestic Lens seminar series.

Thu 14 October 2010, 17:00

'The Dreyfus affair revisited'

Venue:History Faculty Building

Speaker: Ruth Harris (New College)

Modern European History Seminar - Michaelmas Term 2010

The seminar will take place at 5 p.m. on Thursdays in the History Faculty Building in George Street, Oxford. This is the former Old Boys School, opposite the main cinema. Access is at the rear of the building. The seminar is intended as a forum for all those working on Modern European History in Oxford. Everybody is very welcome to attend. Tea will be available in the Common Room from 4.30 p.m. prior to each seminar.

This event is part of the 'Great Causes' in Modern Europe seminar series.

Tue 12 October 2010, 17:00

Opening the Frontier: New Developments in Governing China’s Contested Periphery

Venue:Dahrendorf Room, Founder’s Building at St Antony’s

Seminar: CIS Seminar: Border Crossings: Explaining China’s International Behaviour Through a Domestic Lens

Dr Allen Carlson (Associate Professor in Cornell University’s Government Department). Opening the Frontier: New Developments in Governing China’s Contested Periphery

Seminars will be held from 5.00 to 6.30 pm on Tuesdays (unless otherwise stated) in the Dahrendorf Room, Founder’s Building at St Antony’s College

All are welcome

Convenor: Professor Rosemary Foot

(This seminar series is financially supported by The Asian Studies Centre St Antony’s College, British Inter-Universities China Centre University of Oxford and the Centre for International Studies DPIR University of Oxford)

This event is part of the CIS Seminar: Border Crossings: Explaining China’s International Behaviour Through a Domestic Lens seminar series.

Further information: asian@sant.ox.ac.uk

This event is part of the Border Crossings: Explaining China’s International Behaviour Through a Domestic Lens seminar series.

Mon 24 May 2010, 15:00

Oxford Institute for Ethics, Law and Armed Conflict

Tuesday 1.00 - 2.30pm, Room G, Manor Road Building.

This seminar series is co-hosted by ELAC and the University of Oxford Programme on the Changing Character of War (CCW).

  • Professor William Schabas (National University of Ireland), ‘The Review Conference of the Rome Statute: Amending the Statute and Taking Stock of the Court’

This event is part of the Sociological Research seminar series.